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The father of Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes has hired a Washington-DC attorney to represent him in a federal case alleging he violated campaign laws during his daughter’s 2014 U.S. Senate run. 

Spectrum News’ Pure Politics first reported that Jerry Lundergan has retained Marc Elias, a high-profile political attorney who served as legal advisor to Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential bid.  He has also represented the Democratic National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. 

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Elizabethtown and Somerset Community Colleges are holding recruiting events Thursday and Friday for Boeing manufacturing positions in Washington state. The company is offering up to $20,000 for relocating.  

Boeing is looking for people with skills in electrical technology, engineering and electronics technology and industrial maintenance technology. Butch Tincher is an instructor at Somerset Community College. He said Boeing’s hiring exam mirrors the school’s exit exam.

Lisa Autry

At 3.3 million, a record number of Kentuckians are registered to vote ahead of the November general election, according to the Secretary of State's Office. 

The commonwealth will try to grow its voter rolls even further on Tuesday in conjunction with National Voter Registration Day. 

Many agencies, high schools, and colleges and universities in Kentucky will be conducting voter registration drives with the signup deadline only two weeks away.

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

Kentucky transportation officials say newly redesigned driver's licenses will enhance security and make it harder for counterfeiters to duplicate.

State Department of Vehicle Regulation Commissioner Matt Henderson showed off the design at a news conference Monday.

With the change, Kentucky will become one of the final states to comply with a federal travel law passed in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The state will begin issuing the new licenses in January.

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein remained in his job on Monday afternoon after a visit to the White House that sparked a flurry of reports suggesting he might resign or be fired.

A person close to Rosenstein said he was expecting to be fired after the New York Times story on Friday about his early tenure in office. The deputy attorney general oversees the special counsel's Russia investigation, which has made Rosenstein's job security part of the long-running political battle over the probe.

Kentucky Wesleyan University

A Holocaust survivor and attorney who helped prosecute the murderers of three civil rights workers, brought to the screen in the movie "Mississippi Burning," is speaking in Owensboro on Sept. 25. 

John Rosenberg has also provided years of legal service to residents of Kentucky. Eighty-six-year-old Rosenberg was the founding director of the Appalachian Research and Defense Fund and served in that position for more than 30 years. He had a precarious childhood journey that eventually led to  that legal aid organization and Prestonsburg, Kentucky.

He was seven years old on Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, Nov. 9, 1938 when the Nazis broke windows of Jewish businesses and burned synagogues across Germany. Rosenberg says one of the synagogues that was burned was next to his home in the town of Magdeburg. 


JESSE WRIGHT / WEST VIRGINIA PUBLIC BROADCASTING

As President Trump attempts to revive the struggling coal industry, the administration’s top regulator for mine safety used a recent lecture at West Virginia University to lay out his priorities for the agency charged with keeping miners safe.

Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health David Zatezalo outlined the Trump administration's priorities for the Mine Safety and Health Administration, or MSHA.

The West Virginia native and former coal mine executive addressed students, faculty and industry representatives at the annual William Poundstone lecture series at West Virginia University.


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Next month the Kentucky Board of Education will consider implementing new high school graduation requirements geared towards making sure students are ready to enter the workforce or pursue higher education.

The proposed requirements include mandating that students pass “foundation” reading and math exams before they can receive their diploma and meeting benchmark test scores or participating in vocational programs to prove they’re ready to find employment or continue academic pursuits.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

A legislative task force formed to address emergency diabetes needs in Kentucky met for the first time this week. The group, made up of legislators who are physicians, doctors, firefighters and more, met in Frankfort on Thursday.

Christel Aprigliano, chief executive officer of the Diabetes Patient Advocacy Coalition, presented to the task force. She said she’s experienced legal obstacles as a type 1 diabetes patient, but said Kentucky lawmakers could improve things.

office of the Surgeon General

In a comprehensive new report on the opioid crisis, the U.S. surgeon general writes that stigma remains a major barrier to treatment and urges a more supportive approach to those in need.

Surgeon General Jerome Adams wrote in his Spotlight on Opioids report that stigma has prevented people with opioid use disorders from seeking treatment.

“The way we as a society view and address opioid use disorder must change,” Adams wrote. “Individual lives and the health of our nation depend on it.”

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LRS LIVE Replay: Tim Easton and Beth Bombara

Tim Easton and Beth Bombara played Lost River Sessions LIVE on Thursday, marking the beginning of the third season of live shows at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green. Easton, a singer-songwriter from Nashville, has published more than 100 songs and has performed all over the U.S. and in Europe. Bombara, who is from St. Louis, released her latest album in 2017, called Map & No Direction.

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