Ryland Barton

After Gov. Matt Bevin called a surprise legislative session on Monday afternoon, state lawmakers traveled to Frankfort and began working on a new attempt to overhaul the state’s pension systems.

Following hours of closed-door discussion, Republican leaders of the legislature filed two different versions of a new pension bill. One is similar to legislation struck down by the Kentucky Supreme Court and the other is a new proposal brought by Gov. Matt Bevin.

Greg Kelly's grandson, Caden, scampers to the tree-shaded creek behind his grandfather's house to catch crawdads, as Kelly shuffles along, trying to keep up. Kelly's small day pack holds an oxygen tank with a clear tube clipped to his nose. He has chairs spaced out on the short route so he can stop every few minutes, sit down and catch his breath, until he has enough wind and strength to start out again for the creek.

J. Tyler Franklin

Days after the Kentucky Supreme Court struck down legislation that would have overhauled the state’s pension system, Gov. Matt Bevin has called for lawmakers to return to Frankfort and pass a new version of the bill.

The Kentucky Supreme Court struck down the Republican pension measure last week saying that lawmakers violated the state constitution by not following proper procedures designed to give legislators and the public time to review legislation.

Kentucky AG Opposes Ruling Striking Down Health Care Law

18 hours ago
Ryland Barton

Heading into a 2019 race for governor, Kentucky's Democratic Attorney General said Monday he will have a "more vocal" role in appealing a recent federal court ruling that struck down a federal law giving government-funded health coverage to more than 400,000 Kentuckians.

The Friday ruling from Texas U.S. District Judge Reed O'Connor likely won't take effect while the case enters a lengthy appeals process. But the decision ensures health care, specifically Medicaid, will stay in focus during one of the nation's three governor's races next year.

Lisa Autry

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is hopeful that debate over border security will not lead to a partial government shutdown later this week. 

President Trump said last week he would be "proud to shut down the government" if Congress doesn’t approve the $5 billion in funding that he wants to build a wall on the border with Mexico. 

In a wide-ranging interview at his field office in Bowling green on Friday, Senator Paul said while he’s in favor of enhanced border security, he’s not in favor of giving the president a blank check.

Sydney Boles

On a cool but clear November day about a dozen residents from eastern Kentucky’s coal mining region crowded into the lobby of an office building in the small town of London, Kentucky. That’s where Kentucky’s powerful senior senator, Mitch McConnell, has his local field office. 

McConnell’s staff let the local advocates for black lung treatment into the office a few at a time to make their case for funding the federal Black Lung Disability Trust Fund.

There was a lot of laughter and plenty of selfies, but there was tension, too. Many of these residents know miners and families affected by the deadly disease who depend on benefits from the fund, and they know the clock is ticking on a tax that has supported the fund for more than 35 years.


Indiana Governor Says Passing Hate Crime Law 'Long Overdue'

Dec 17, 2018
Flickr/Creative Commons

The spray-painting of a swastika outside a suburban Indianapolis synagogue this summer was the final straw for Republican Gov. Eric Holcomb, who quickly called for Indiana to join the 45 states that have hate crime laws.

"It's not only the right thing to do, it's long overdue," Holcomb said Friday during an interview with The Associated Press. "I'm convinced the overwhelming majority of Hoosiers feel the same way."

As the annual legislative session draws near, though, some warn that such a proposal could spark a bitter cultural debate that would bring unwanted attention to the deeply conservative state, much like the 2015 religious objections law that critics widely panned as a sanctioning of discrimination against the LGBT community and that drew a stiff rebuke from big business.

Court: Testimony from OxyContin Maker Must Be Unsealed

Dec 14, 2018
Creative Commons

A Kentucky appeals court says the secret testimony from a former president of one of the world's largest manufacturers of dangerously addictive opioid painkillers must be released to the public.

A three-judge panel ruled Friday the deposition of Richard Sackler must be unsealed, along with about 17 million pages of other documents that were part of Kentucky's complex lawsuit against OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma. The testimony could reveal more information about what company officials knew about the drug when they were selling it.

Lisa Autry

The Kentucky Supreme Court on Thursday struck down a law that made changes to one of the country’s worst-funded public pension systems.  The state’s Democratic attorney general called it a "landmark win for all our public servants" while the Republican governor warned the ruling would "destroy the financial condition of Kentucky." 

In a 7-0 decision, justices found that me manner in which the General Assembly passed pension reform legislation this year violated the state Constitution.

J.Tyler Franklin/WFPL

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin has posted a video criticizing the Courier Journal after the newspaper announced this week that it’s partnering with the independent media nonprofit ProPublica on a year-long investigative project. 

The Courier Journal says the project with ProPublica will examine an agency of Kentucky state government, continuing what the newspaper describes as its 150-year tradition "of protecting taxpayers, safeguarding the environment and holding public officials and government agencies accountable."

In a 3-minute video, Governor Bevin ripped into the investigative team.

“The Courier Journal, which pretends that it’s an actual news organization or a publication, is so remarkably biased they are now full in bed with this particular organization ProPublica.”


Pages

Lost River Sessions

Sustaining Members

Special Programming

Photo Galleries

Bryan Lemon/WKU

LRS Live Replay: The Local Honeys & Barren River Ramblers

It as an evening of old time music on Nov. 10 when two Kentucky groups - The Local Honeys and Barren River Ramblers took the stage at The Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green for Lost River Sessions LIVE.

Read More

Monday Afternoons at 4:45c/5:45e

Exploring the changing economy of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia

E-mail Newsletter