Mitch McConnell

Lisa Autry

Mitch McConnell is acknowledging his hand in restricting Gov. Andy Beshear’s ability to fill a vacancy in the event that one of the state’s U.S. Senators dies or leaves office early. 

During a stop in Bowling Green on Tuesday, Sen. McConnell said he’s “not going anywhere,” but  suggested legislative leaders change Kentucky law to limit the governor's power to appoint someone to temporarily take over for a senator until voters can elect a successor.  Lawmakers over-rode Democratic Governor Andy Beshear’s veto of the bill. 

While his office previously said McConnell supported it, the 79-year-old senator said on Tuesday he actually recommended the rule change.

“I had watched over the years the way Senate vacancies are filled in different states," McConnell told WKU Public Radio. "I thought the worst way to fill it was the way Kentucky law set it up so the governor alone picks somebody who can serve a fairly lengthy period of time before there’s an election.”


Updated at 12:22 p.m. ET

In her time as former President Donald Trump's transportation secretary, Elaine Chao repeatedly used her position and agency staff to help family members who run a shipping business with ties to China, in potential violation of federal ethics laws, according to an Office of Inspector General report.

In a highly personal attack, former President Donald Trump blasted Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, calling him an unfit leader of the Republican Party.

"The Republican Party can never again be respected or strong with political 'leaders' like Sen. Mitch McConnell at its helm," Trump said in a lengthy statement Tuesday.

"Mitch is a dour, sullen, and unsmiling political hack, and if Republican Senators are going to stay with him, they will not win again," he added.

Sydney Boles

A Republican-sponsored bill in the Kentucky legislature would require the governor to replace a departing U.S. senator with someone from the same political party.

The proposal is supported by Kentucky’s 78-year-old U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell and comes as state lawmakers continue to try and chip away at Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear’s powers.

Senate Bill 228 would be a big change from how Kentucky governors currently fill senate vacancies — picking whomever they want.

Instead, the governor would have to pick a replacement from a list of three nominees selected by the state party of the departing senator.

NPR

  Both of Kentucky’s U.S. senators voted to acquit Donald Trump on charges that he incited the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Yet Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell capped off his vote with a winding explanation of why the former president should be blamed for the insurrection, but shouldn’t be convicted for it.

“President Trump is practically and morally responsible for provoking the events of the day, no question about it,” McConnell said during a speech on the Senate floor.

“The people who stormed this building believed they were acting on the wishes and instructions of their president.”

Updated at 8:12 a.m. ET

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell dropped his demand that Democrats maintain the Senate filibuster — ending an early stalemate in the Senate that prevented party leaders from negotiating a power-sharing agreement.

Becca Schimmel

The Republican Party of Kentucky voted down a resolution calling on Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell to oppose impeachment charges against former President Donald Trump.

The longshot petition shows that the vast majority of the state’s GOP leadership isn’t willing to force McConnell’s hand on the impeachment issue, though a large number of Republicans are worried he will move to convict the former president.

Over the weekend, members of the Republican State Central Committee held a special meeting to consider the proposal submitted by several local party leaders calling for McConnell to “stand with President Trump and publicly condemn this divisive and unnecessary second impeachment.”

screenshot from C-SPAN

There were calls for unity and predictions of division among Kentucky’s congressional members as Joe Biden was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States.

Kentucky’s Republican senior Sen. Mitch McConnell took part in one of the official festivities—presenting a flag that flew over the inaugural ceremony to new Vice President Kamala Harris.

“The star-spangled banner is the greatest symbol of the endurance of the American idea. It flies over this building on triumphant days and tragic ones. For all factions and all parties,” McConnell said during the ritual.

Sydney Boles

On his last day as senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell directly tied the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol to outgoing President Donald Trump.

“The mob was fed lies,” McConnell said in a speech on the Senate Floor. “They were provoked by the president and other powerful people.”

The statement was the first time McConnell publicly blamed Trump for the insurrection, though he had gotten close in the hours after the riot when he warned of a democratic death spiral “if this election were overturned by mere allegations from the losing side.”

 

  

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., delivered blistering remarks Wednesday afternoon against President Trump and his Republican colleagues who are objecting to the Electoral College results, saying of Congress: "We cannot simply declare ourselves a national board of elections on steroids."

"We'll either hasten down a poisonous path where only the winners of an election actually accept the results or show we can still muster the patriotic courage that our forebears showed, not only in victory, but in defeat," he said.

Stephanie Wolf

The Louisville home of Republican U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was vandalized following his blocking of a push for larger stimulus payments to Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Messages like “Mitch kills poor” and “Where’s my money” were spray painted across the front façade of McConnell’s house in the Highlands neighborhood Saturday morning.

Earlier in the week, McConnell blocked a bill passed by the Democratic-led House that would have boosted stimulus checks in the latest COVID-19 relief package from $600 to $2,000.

The Senate voted Friday to overturn President Trump's veto of the mammoth annual defense bill in an unprecedented act that assures the decades-long continuity for that legislation. It follows a House vote earlier this week.

Updated at 6:17 p.m. ET

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., says a measure that would increase direct payments to many Americans has "no realistic path to quickly pass the Senate."

McConnell is moving ahead with a plan to avoid a public rift within the GOP over stimulus payments demanded by President Trump ahead of a critical runoff election in Georgia.

J. Tyler Franklin

Gov. Andy Beshear says the $2,000 stimulus checks that President Donald Trump and Democrats are pushing for would bring billions in additional direct support to Kentucky families.  

President Trump, Democrats and an increasing number of Republicans have also voiced support for the payments. But on Tuesday Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blocked Democrats efforts to hold an immediate vote to increase stimulus checks to $2,000. 

“The House has already voted for it, the president wants to sign it, the Senate is the only thing standing in the way of $5 billion going to our families, or not,” Beshear said during Tuesday’s Coronavirus briefing.

Updated at 2:34 p.m. ET

Democrats and President Trump hectored Senate Republicans on Tuesday to take up legislation passed by the House that would increase direct relief payments to many Americans — but the path ahead remains unclear.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., acknowledged when the chamber convened that Trump had called attention to a few big issues, including the disbursements. McConnell said the Senate would "begin a process to bring [those] priorities into focus," without saying how or when.

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