U.S. Air Force photo illustration

In his inaugural address Tuesday, Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear addressed two of the core issues he campaigned on: health care insurance and the cost of drugs.

“These are our brothers and our sisters; after the expansion, these neighbors could go see a doctor without the fear of bankruptcy. And the expansion ensured that almost all of Kentucky’s children had access to health care,” Beshear said. “I will honor and strengthen our commitment to these families.”

Beshear’s father, former Gov. Steve Beshear, expanded Medicaid in 2014 to adults without children and to people making up to 138 percent of the poverty limit, or about 400,000 people.

WKYU

Officials in Warren County are asking for residents' input on how to improve local transportation.

The survey from the Bowling Green & Warren County Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) will help shape priorites for future projects. The group's 2045 Metropolitan Transportation Plan (MTP) aims to prepare the region for an estimated 51% population growth within the next 25 years.

MPO Coordinator Karissa Lemon described the MTP as a wish list of projects that's updated every five years, while the Transportation Improvement Program plan covers the near-term.

Screenshot from KET

On a frigid December day in the capital of Frankfort, Democrat Andy Beshear took the oath of office and announced he was on the verge of fulfilling several key campaign promises.

One of Beshear’s first acts in office was to overhaul and appoint new members to the State Board of Education, swiftly replacing the 11 appointed by his predecessor, Republican Matt Bevin, who had a tense relationship with the state’s educators.

“These members were not chosen based on any partisan affiliation, but based on their commitment to make our schools better. To put our children first,” Beshear said in his inaugural address on Tuesday.

Adelina Lancianese

A new report from the nonpartisan budget watchdog group Taxpayers for Common Sense says that an expired coal tax is effectively a taxpayer subsidy for the coal industry. The analysis reflects a growing concern about the fiscal health of a federal fund that supports tens of thousands of disabled coal miners.

The Black Lung Disability Trust Fund was established in 1969 to pay health care expenses for certain disabled coal miners and their dependents. It is supported by coal companies, which pay a limited tax on each ton of coal they remove from the ground. Early this year, Congress allowed the tax to decrease by more than 50 percent. The Government Accountability Office found the move would leave the fund $15 billion in debt by 2050, and would likely require a bailout by taxpayers.


Andy Beshear Sworn In as Kentucky’s 63rd Governor

Dec 10, 2019
Jacob Ryan

Kentucky has a new governor.

Calling on the state to set a national example of casting aside political divisions, Democrat Andy Beshear was sworn in just after midnight Tuesday in the Governor’s Mansion. Beshear defeated Republican Matt Bevin in a close election last month; after a recanvass of the vote totals revealed only one additional vote, Bevin conceded.

Bevin received a long ovation on Monday from administration employees who lined a Capitol hallway as the outgoing governor walked to his office. They all gathered in the Rotunda, where Bevin said they had set a new standard for how government should operate in his single term.

Vivian Stockman and Southwings

Appalachian surface coal miners are consistently overexposed to toxic silica dust, according to new research from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and surface mine dust contains more silica than does dust in underground coal mines. 

The research released Tuesday is the first to specifically analyze long-term data on exposure to toxic silica dust for workers at surface mines. The work reveals that while attention has been trained on a surge in disease among underground coal miners, surface miners are similarly at risk of contracting coal worker’s pneumoconiosis, or black lung disease. 

WKU

Some of the biggest challenges facing young adults are finding a job and a place to live.

This is especially true for those on the autism spectrum. A new program expected to launch in the fall of 2020 at Western Kentucky University is designed to assist adults on the autism spectrum live and work on their own.

LifeWorks at WKU broke ground on a residential complex near the Bowling Green campus in October. The residential buildings being used for the program will be completed by renovating existing apartment buildings along Adams St.


Updated at 8:50 p.m. ET

House Democrats unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump on Tuesday morning, charging him with abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress.

Read the articles of impeachment here.

At the start of President Trump's term, Republicans had solidified control in Washington and their hold on state governments across the country, with 33 GOP governors in power. Democrats were at their lowest numbers in nearly a century — down to just 16 Democratic governors and having control of only 13 state legislatures.

Ryland Barton

A Democratic state lawmaker from Warren County will have an insider’s view when Governor-Elect Andy Beshear takes the oath of office in a private ceremony early Tuesday morning.   

Representative Patti Minter will attend the formal swearing-in at 12:01 a.m.  A public swearing-in ceremony will take place on the Capitol steps Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. 

Minter is one of the co-chairs of the inaugural committee and says all the festivities will emphasize unity.

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Rob Taber

LRS Live Replay: Whiskey Bent Valley Boys & Willie Huston

This season of Lost River Sessions Live wrapped up last month with a performance by Kentucky natives the Whiskey Bent Valley Boys and Willie Huston at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green, KY.

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