Tennessee Valley Authority

A new report says the Tennessee Valley Authority made the difficult, but correct decision to close a coal-fired power plant in western Kentucky.  

The study, from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis based in Cleveland, warns potential investors about trying to resuscitate the Paradise Fossil Plant in Muhlenberg County.

The report outlines seven risk factors of keeping the plant open, including the operation and maintenance costs.  Co-author David Schlissel said the 50-year-old plant has surpassed its usefulness as a viable power and profit generator.

Thinkstock

Kentucky’s only abortion provider is asking a federal appeals court to reconsider its ruling in favor of the state’s new ultrasound abortion requirement earlier this year.

On behalf of EMW Women’s Surgical Clinic, the American Civil Liberties Union has been suing to try and block Kentucky’s law that requires doctors to show patients an ultrasound before performing an abortion.

The ACLU argues that the 2017 measure violates doctors’ free speech rights by requiring them to describe the ultrasound even if patients demand them not to. The law has been defended by Republican Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration.

Abbey Oldham/WKU Public Radio

A part of Kentucky already known for its whiskey production is gaining another distillery.

A startup company, Log Still Distilling LLC, says it will invest $12 million into a new bourbon and rye whiskey operation that could produce up to 20 full-time jobs.

The company formally announced Friday plans to create a campus between the communities of New Haven and New Hope that would include a distillery, bottling operation, rickhouses, and a visitor’s center, which will offer a gift shop and tasting room.

Construction is scheduled to begin later this year, with the facilities opening by the end of 2020.


Owensboro Christian Church

World Refugee Day is being celebrated Saturday in Owensboro.

The International Center of Kentucky is hosting the event ahead of the United Nations-celebrated holiday on June 20.

Susann Bartlett, an employment specialist in the center’s Owensboro office, says the goal of the event is to connect refugees with various resources, while honoring their contributions to the area.

“It’s a chance for the public, our general public here in the community, to interact with our international community, and just get a little taste of culture and tradition and see what they can bring to our community.”

AMR

Daviess County has signed a contract with a new ambulance company, but Owensboro Health will no longer provide backup service.

The new contract that goes into effect on July 1 is with American Medical Response, which also provides ambulance service for Evansville, Indiana.

Daviess County previously had a contract with Yellow Ambulance for 18 years.

The current issue of concern is the backup provider. Daviess County has had an agreement with the organization that is now Owensboro Health for backup ambulance service since 1978.

Prison overcrowding has increasingly become part of the national conversation. Meanwhile, states are trying to do more to keep ex-offenders from going back to jail after completing their sentences.

Recidivism has several negative consequences, including state spending on housing inmates and the fact that potential members of the workforce are unavailable.

This is the first story in a four-part series of reports about efforts to combat the trend in our region.


J. Tyler Franklin

The Kentucky Supreme Court has unanimously ruled that Gov. Matt Bevin didn’t do anything wrong in 2017 when he overhauled several state boards that deal with public education.

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear sued Bevin over the actions, arguing that the governor had circumvented the legislature’s lawmaking authority by appointing non-voting charter school advisers to the Kentucky Board of Education and totally replacing boards that deal with certifying teachers and establishing curriculum standards, among other changes.

marsyslaw.us

The Kentucky Supreme Court has unanimously ruled against “Marsy’s Law,” a proposal that would have enshrined a new list of rights for crime victims in the state constitution.

Kentucky voters supported the measure by a wide margin during a ballot referendum on Election Day last year, but the court ruled that the entire 553-word proposal should have been included on the ballot instead of only a 38-word summary.

The language included on last year’s ballot was established by the Marsy’s Law bill, which passed the state legislature in 2018.

Henderson is one step closer to becoming the 11th Kentucky city with a law that bans discrimination against the LGBTQ community when it comes to employment, housing, and public accommodations. 

The city commission voted 3-to-2 in favor of a so-called fairness ordinance during a first reading at Tuesday’s meeting.  Mayor Steve Austin cast one of the two ‘no’ votes but realizes opinions have changed in the past couple of decades.

Neighbor Convicted of Assaulting Rand Paul Sells His Home

Jun 12, 2019
Lisa Autry

The neighbor convicted of attacking U.S. Sen. Rand Paul has sold his home next door to the senator.

Rene Boucher pleaded guilty last year to assaulting Paul. Paul also won a civil verdictagainst Boucher for more than $582,000 in January.

Court records in the civil case show Boucher sold his Bowling Green home in May and delivered the proceeds of the sale, about $482,000, to the court. The records say the money will be held in an account until the civil proceedings are resolved.

Paul testified during a three-day trial this year that he feared for his life after Boucher, an anesthesiologist, slammed into him in their upscale neighborhood in late 2017.

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LRS Live Replay: Nikki Lane, Howlin' Brothers & Leslie Weiler Meng

The season finale of Lost River Sessions LIVE featured Nikki Lane, a Nashville singer-songwriter who blends country, rock and blues. Mike LoPinto played alongside Lane on guitar and she was also joined for part of her set by The Howlin' Brothers and Leslie Weiler Meng.

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