https://homethods.com/

As demands for racial justice play out in Louisville and across the nation, community members from Warren County are tackling racial issues closer to home. 

A new group called Gamechangers is working to bring African-Americans equal opportunities in the local job market.  Attorney Alan Simpson is a member of the group, and says communities can discriminate unintentionally.

“There is systemic racism everywhere. It doesn’t mean everyone is wearing a hood and burning crosses in people’s front yards, but you have to be thoughtful about your actions," Simpson said. "If you want to employ someone who’s African-American, then seek them out. They don’t necessarily come in and apply for a job if they think, 'Well, everyone is white and they’re not going to want me there.'”


Kate Howard

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron will release the recording of the grand jury that was impaneled to consider charges against the officers who shot and killed Breonna Taylor, Cameron said Tuesday.

Earlier in the day, during the arraignment for former Louisville Metro Police officer Brett Hankison, a Jefferson County judge ordered Cameron’s office to file the recording with the court by Wednesday. Cameron said in an emailed statement that his office has an ethical obligation to keep grand jury proceedings secret but it was apparent that couldn’t happen due to the public interest in the case, and he will comply with the judge’s order.

Stephanie Wolf

After Kentucky logged its highest-ever number of coronavirus cases last week, Gov. Andy Beshear says he believes the pandemic is escalating in the state.

There were 4,949 new cases of coronavirus cases in Kentucky last week—more than any other week during the pandemic.

During his Monday afternoon coronavirus briefing, Beshear blamed the rise on people who haven’t been following masking and social distancing requirements during the pandemic.

“When we get casual, when we don’t show urgency, what we see is alarming trends in the virus, more cases and ultimately more people passing away,” he said.

Benny Becker

Ohio environmental regulators have canceled key permits needed for an underground natural gas liquids storage facility proposed along the Ohio River. 

According to an order from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, permits to drill three three Class III solution mining wells in Monroe County, Ohio were cancelled on Sept. 21. Cancellation was requested by Powhatan Salt Company LCC. The proposed wells are associated with the Mountaineer NGL Storage project, a multi-million dollar underground natural gas liquids storage project. 

Experts say natural gas liquid storage — like the proposed Mountaineer project — is crucial to building out the Ohio Valley’s petrochemical industry.

President Trump and Democrat Joe Biden square off in the first of three general-election presidential debates Tuesday night.

The debate is high stakes and carries risks for both candidates.

Here are six questions ahead of the debate, to be moderated by Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace beginning at 9 p.m. ET and held at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.

1. Can Trump avoid the sitting-president first-debate slump?

Jeff Young

With early voting set to begin in two weeks, state officials still haven’t approved most Kentucky counties’ plans for in-person voting.

Many Kentucky counties plan to have fewer in-person polling locations amid a shortage of poll workers during the coronavirus pandemic.

Over the summer, Gov. Andy Beshear and Secretary of State Michael Adams issued an order allowing all voters to cast ballots by mail if they are worried about catching or transmitting coronavirus and requiring all counties to have early in-person voting starting on October 13.

Shelby County Detention Center

Former Louisville Metro Police officer Brett Hankison entered a plea of not guilty in his initial court appearance before a Jefferson County judge Monday afternoon.

The proceeding was conducted via telephone. Hankison was on the call.

Hankison is one of three officers who fired their weapons while participating in the March 13 raid that left Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old Black woman, dead in her south Jefferson County home. He was fired by the Louisville Metro Police in June.

Hankison was charged with three counts of first-degree wanton endangerment, which all stem from him firing his gun into apartments that neighbored Taylor’s, and the only officer indicted by a Jefferson County grand jury for his actions during the fatal raid.

Evan Heichelbech

Fayette County Clerk Don Blevins says he’s confident his office will be able to handle the election.

But it’s a juggling act.

“I mean if you think about it, we’re running kind of three different kinds of elections simultaneously,” Blevins said. “You’ve got a normal election day, you’ve got early voting in person and now vote by mail again.”

Kentucky normally only allows early voting and mail-in voting with an excuse—voters have to sign an affidavit promising that they’re disabled, ill, in the military or temporarily out of the county.

 


Michelle Tyrene Johnson

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer will not extend the countywide curfew that ended Monday at 6:30 a.m., his office announced in a news release. Traffic barricades around downtown that went up nearly a week ago will remain in place, and the city will reassess those restrictions daily, according to Fischer’s office.

Louisville police said they arrested more than 200 people related to protests since the curfew went into effect Wednesday. That’s when a grand jury which considered evidence from Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s office announced it would indict a former Louisville Metro Police officer, Brett Hankison, on wanton endangerment charges unrelated to Breonna Taylor’s death. No officers were charged for her killing.

WKU Public Radio

Governors, Secretaries of State, and other state and local election officials throughout the Ohio Valley are preparing for an unprecedented election during a global pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced local governments to change practices that have been the same for decades, and to do so in a highly charged political environment. 

Some of the main changes are safety precautions suggested by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State officials in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia are ensuring residents feel comfortable voting in person if they choose to, while making adjustments for those who are concerned about contracting COVID-19. 


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New Weekend Programs Airing on WKU Public Radio

WKU Public Radio

New Weekend Programs Now Airing on WKU Public Radio

WKU Public Radio has some changes coming to our weekend programming lineup, aimed at enhancing the quantity and quality of shows our listeners can expect to hear on Saturdays and Sundays! The decision by American Public Media to halt production of Live From Here has led to some new additions to our weekends, and some changes to when a few current shows air. Starting Saturday, Sept. 19, our regular Saturday lineup will include an hour of Lost River Sessions Radio, the radio companion to the WKYU PBS series Lost River Sessions ; and the music program Mountain Stage .

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Office of Governor Andy Beshear

WATCH: Gov. Beshear's Live News Briefings about COVID-19

The novel coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19, have had an enormous impact on daily life in Kentucky and the world, prompting governments at all levels to respond. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear has been holding semi-regular news briefings about measures being taken in the state to combat the spread of COVID-19. Those briefings are being streamed live at Gov. Beshear's Facebook page and YouTube channel. You can access live webstreaming of the governor's daily news conferences by clicking on the links above.

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Ask Us Your Questions About Coronavirus In The Ohio Valley

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Ask Us Your Questions About Coronavirus In The Ohio Valley

The Ohio Valley ReSource and its seven partner stations in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia have mobilized to cover the coronavirus pandemic and the profound effects it is having on how we live in the region. This is an anxious, bewildering time, and we know you have a lot of questions. We want to help answer them. Ask your question below and the ReSource reporters will try their best to find an answer.

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Bryan Lemon

LRS Live Replay: Kyshona & Dax Evans

February's Lost River Sessions LIVE show at the Captiol Arts Center in Bowling Green was a special one. Fans saw local singer and songwriter Dax Evans take the stage, performing some heartfelt original songs. Meanwhile, Nashville artist, and former music therapist Kyshona, blessed the venue on the eve of her album release with new music.

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