Owensboro Public Schools

The superintendent of Owensboro Public Schools is stepping down at the end of this month, with an interim superintendent taking over at the start of the new year. 

Superintendent Nick Brake has led Owensboro Public Schools since 2013. He announced in June he would leave the position at the end of this calendar year. 

The school board has named district Chief Academic Officer Matthew Constant as interim superintendent beginning Jan. 1, 2020.

Constant said he is humbled and appreciative that the board has the confidence in him to lead the district during the search for a permanent superintendent.

“Dr. Brake is leaving us in such a good, good place in our district," Constant said. "He’s done a whole lot of things to advance us forward, and I think the interim’s job is to keep that forward momentum without infusing too much change.”


Becca Schimmel

If Gov.-elect Andy Beshear fulfills his campaign promise to replace the members of the Kentucky Board of Education, he would be the first governor to do so since lawmakers tried to insulate the board from political pressures in 1990 as part of the Kentucky Education Reform Act.

Beshear, a Democrat, has said he would overhaul the Board of Education by executive order “on day one,” a rallying point for many educators who disagreed with priorities of the current 11-member board appointed by Republican Gov. Matt Bevin.

Beshear has also said he hopes that the board would replace its only employee, Education Commissioner Wayne Lewis, who was hired shortly after Bevin’s appointees took control of the board in 2018.

The Mountain Air Project

Isabella Back, 18, pulls her jacket tight around herself as she crosses the gravel driveway. “So we’re going about 10 feet from my house to my dad’s workshop,” she says, and pushes through a door in a big, red barn.

The Kona, Kentucky, shop is crowded with cluttered work tables and hulking machines, and the sound of whirring and grinding fills the air. The shop smells of paint and other chemicals. Back’s dad, Rod, started this metal fabrication shop after he got laid off from coal mining. He mostly makes signs for local businesses. He waves a friendly hello.


Creative Commons

The Supreme Court has left in place a Kentucky law requiring doctors to perform ultrasounds and show fetal images to patients before abortions.

The justices did not comment Monday in refusing to review an appeals court ruling that upheld the law. The American Civil Liberties Union challenged the law on behalf of Kentucky's lone abortion clinic.

The ACLU argued that “display and describe” ultrasound laws violate physicians' speech rights. The ACLU said the Supreme Court “has rubber-stamped extreme political interference in the doctor-patient relationship.”

Updated at 2:26 p.m. ET

The Russia investigation was properly predicated and an internal watchdog found no evidence of political bias — but there were numerous problems with the surveillance of a former junior campaign aide to Donald Trump.

Inspector General Michael Horowitz documents those findings in a new report unveiled on Monday.

Read the report here.

Updated at 3:22 p.m. ET

Democrats in the House are taking the next step toward impeachment on Monday with the presentation of what they call the evidence of President Trump's improper conduct in the Ukraine affair.

"President Trump's persistent and continuing effort to coerce a foreign country to help him cheat to win an election is a clear and present danger to our free and fair elections and to our national security," said Daniel Goldman, the Democratic staff counsel who asked many of the questions during the House Intelligence Committee hearings.

Lisa Autry

A Democratic state lawmaker exploring a run against U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell says he would be committed to the Green New Deal if elected to Congress. 

State Representative Charles Booker from Jefferson County was in Bowling Green on Friday where he picked up an endorsement from the Sunrise Movement, a youth-led climate activism group. 

Booker grew up in Louisville’s West End, the poorest zip code in the state. Booker said neighborhoods like his are disproportionately affected by environmental hazards.

J. Tyler Franklin

Outgoing Gov. Matt Bevin claimed he lost his reelection because Democrats “harvested votes in urban areas.”

Gov.-elect Andy Beshear named some of his cabinet secretaries. And education commissioner Wayne Lewis defended himself as his job might be in jeopardy in the new administration.

Jonese Franklin from member station WFPL talked to Capitol reporter Ryland Barton for this week’s edition of Kentucky Politics Distilled.


People have been playing music together in the small Appalachian town of Hindman, Ky., since it was founded in the late 1800s. Today, one of the few businesses still open in the town is the Appalachian School of Luthiery, which teaches people how to build wooden stringed instruments. Now that school is playing a role in helping the local community overcome drug addiction.

Rob Taber

This season of Lost River Sessions Live wrapped up last month with a performance by Kentucky natives the Whiskey Bent Valley Boys and Willie Huston at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green, KY. 


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Rob Taber

LRS Live Replay: Whiskey Bent Valley Boys & Willie Huston

This season of Lost River Sessions Live wrapped up last month with a performance by Kentucky natives the Whiskey Bent Valley Boys and Willie Huston at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green, KY.

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