Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

As President Trump's legal team pressed the case for acquittal on Monday, they repeatedly made two points: the charges against Trump do not meet the constitution's criteria for impeachment. And if the president is removed from office for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, it will set a "dangerous" precedent.

"You cannot turn conduct that is not impeachable into impeachable conduct simply by using words like quid pro quo," said one of Trump's lawyers, Alan Dershowitz, calling the charges "vague, indefinable."

Anne Rayner | VUMC

Vanderbilt University Medical Center is preparing to have fewer organs to transplant, starting next week. Academic medical centers banded together to slow down a new distribution plan for donated livers, but they’ve failed to convince a federal judge to intervene ahead of what could be a lengthy court battle.

The new distribution map, created by the United Network for Organ Sharing, is supposed to get livers to the most critical patients (within 500 nautical miles) rather than the closest by. It’s a years-long effort to even the playing field because patients in the Southeast and Midwest have an easier time getting a match at the moment, which has resulted in Vanderbilt having one of the busiest transplant centers in the nation.


BarLouie.com/Evansville

A national restaurant chain with several locations in our region has filed for bankruptcy and closed 38 of its gastropubs.

However, Bar Louie locations in Owensboro and Lexington, Kentucky and Evansville, Indiana will remain open.

Michael Frierdich and his wife launched the Bar Louie franchise in Evansville 10 years ago. Frierdich said he had recent discussions with corporate headquarters in Texas.

“I have heard of no franchise stores closing at this time. It’s just corporate stores that were nonperforming, and most of them were in malls where the traffic’s down and the sales are down," said Frierdich. "It’ll have no impact on our operation in Evansville. We just signed a new franchise agreement for 10 additional years.”

LG&E Proposes Largest Solar Field In Kentucky

17 hours ago
Duke Energy

Louisville Gas and Electric is seeking approval from state utility regulators to build the largest solar array in Kentucky.

If approved, the 100-megawatt plant in Hardin County would be one of at least four utility-scale projects coming online in Kentucky in the next three years. The project would be 10 times larger than the current title holder, a 10-megawatt LG&E facility near Harrodsburg.

The push for more solar in Kentucky follows a countrywide trend as utilities increasingly turn to renewables for new electricity generation.

 


Thinkstock

Kentucky’s attorney general has joined Indiana, Tennessee, and 15 other states in urging a federal appeals court to uphold an Ohio law that bans abortions when the unborn child has Down Syndrome. 

Attorney General Daniel Cameron has filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.  A three-judge panel initially invalidated Ohio’s law, but the entire Sixth Circuit, which has more than a dozen judges, recently agreed to rehear the case. 

The brief argues while current law allows a woman to have an abortion, she doesn’t have the right to decide whether a child lives or dies based on a perceived disability.  The brief says those types of abortions are discriminatory against the unborn child. 


Alexandra Kanik

Just before dawn in January 2018, 27 barges were floating like a net along the banks of the Ohio River, downstream of the city of Pittsburgh. Instead of fish, the fleet caught chunks of ice that broke off in the warming, fast-moving waters as it waited for a tow through the nearby Emsworth Locks and Dams.

The area had experienced record rainfall, and the river rose more than 12 feet in about 30 hours. The barges, some loaded with coal and cement, were lashed together with steel cables in a grid-like pattern, then secured to pilings equipped with large metal mooring rings.


LRC Public Information

A measure is moving through the Kentucky legislature that would provide the necessary funding to build a veterans nursing home in Bowling Green.

The Kentucky House of Representatives will vote on Monday on HB 24, sponsored by State Rep. Michael Meredith.

The House Appropriations and Revenue Committee  passed the bill last week that puts $2.5 million toward design work.

Muhlenbergcounty911.org

Muhlenberg County has a new 911 website that allows residents to anonymously report concerns that are not life-threatening. 

The new website that went live in December can be used instead of a phone call for issues such as registering an after-hours contact for a business.  

Muhlenberg County 911 Supervisor David Knight said another new convenience is an online registry for cattle and livestock. Knight said in his rural community, stray cattle are pretty common.

“We do our best to keep the livestock out of the road until we can find an owner," he said. "Most of the time it is given to us. We’re who people call for that.” 


Alix Mattingly

In our latest edition of Kentucky Politics Distilled, a voter ID bill passed a major hurdle on its way through the legislature. Anti-abortion advocates are throwing their support behind new abortion restrictions, and Republican education leaders are pushing for every school in the state to have an armed guard.


Updated at 9:00 p.m. ET

House Democrats on Friday finished their third and final day of arguments that President Trump, impeached by the House, now should be convicted and removed from office by the Senate.

The president's lawyers will get their turn to lay out the case for acquittal starting this weekend.

"A toxic mess"

Pages

Special Coverage

Special Coverage of Senate Impeachment Trial

Become a Member Today

LRS Archive

Rob Taber

LRS Live Replay: Whiskey Bent Valley Boys & Willie Huston

This season of Lost River Sessions Live wrapped up last month with a performance by Kentucky natives the Whiskey Bent Valley Boys and Willie Huston at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green, KY.

Read More

Monday Afternoons at 4:45c/5:45e

Exploring the changing economy of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia

Join our mailing list

We'll send you occasional updates about WKU Public Radio