Mark Doliner/Creative Commons

Automakers are increasingly investing time and research into creating driverless vehicles, but a Kentucky expert says the new technology could face hurdles if the necessary infrastructure isn’t created.

President Trump and members of Congress have repeatedly tried and failed to make a deal on an infrastructure spending package. According to a report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers, Kentucky’s roads are improving, but there’s still about six billion dollars’ worth of unfunded projects.


Feeding America has determined that too many people in Barren County, Kentucky are food insecure. A new montly mass distribution is being launched get more food to residents in the Glasgow and Cave City areas.

Feeding America Kentucky’s Heartland, which is based in Elizabethtown, already distributes more than 12 million meals each year through food pantries, soup kitchens, and programs for children and seniors in 42 counties.

Even so, not enough food is getting into Barren County. The recent “Map the Meal Gap” report from Feeding America shows that 6,700 adults and 2,100 children in the county do not have reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food. 


Liz Schlemmer

Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration says 1,074 Kentucky teachers broke the law by calling in sick to protest at the state legislature this year and that the educators are eligible to be fined $1,000 each for every day missed.

A release from Kentucky Labor Cabinet Secretary David Dickerson says that teachers won’t be fined this time, but that they might be in the future.

“Let it be clearly understood that the grace extended in this instance will not be extended for future such proven violations,” Dickerson said in a statement.

McConnell Undergoes Surgery to Repair Shoulder Fracture

Aug 16, 2019
Becca Schimmel

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell underwent successful surgery to repair a fracture in his shoulder — an injury he suffered when he fell at his Kentucky home earlier this month.

The surgery occurred Thursday in his hometown of Louisville, a McConnell spokesman said Friday.

"The surgery was performed without incident, and the Leader is grateful to the surgical team for their skill," McConnell spokesman David Popp said in a brief statement.

McConnell's staff did not immediately respond to an email seeking additional details about the procedure.

Colin Jackson

Time spent incarcerated or in rehabilitation centers is common when someone makes a mistake or needs to address substance abuse issues.

"Step down" services, however, aren't as common.

Those efforts provide a place for growth and a sense of community that helps soften the transition toward independence from a rough spot in life.

The Owensboro-based non-profit, Fresh Start for Women, is among those working to accomplish that goal.


Somerset Community College

Western Kentucky University and Somerset Community College formally signed an agreement Thursday that will lead to expanded degree offerings in Pulaski County.

The partnership will allow WKU to offer bachelor’s degrees through SCC, a two-year college. The aim is to increase access for Pulaski County-area students with work or family obligations who need to remain in the region.

SCC President Carey Castle said increasing local college degree holders will have a wide-ranging impact.

“I was in a meeting this morning with Somerset-Pulaski Economic Development Authority, and those industry individuals are just looking forward to this opportunity to get university graduates in the area.”

J. Tyler Franklin

Lt. Gov. Jenean Hampton has filed a lawsuit against Gov. Matt Bevin over the firings of two of her staffers earlier this year.

The development is the latest in the ongoing battle between the former Republican allies after Bevin didn’t select Hampton to be on his re-election ticket.

In the 12-page complaint, Hampton argues that Bevin doesn’t have the authority to fire employees in her office and asks the court to restore her former staffers.

 


J. Tyler Franklin

The University of Louisville is buying Jewish Hospital and other affiliated Louisville KentuckyOne health providers. But there are still a lot of unknowns in how this plan will work, and how it could change the state’s relationship with the Louisville research and health care institution. 

There are a few things we know: the Bevin administration — with the legislature’s approval and buy-in — will loan U of L $50 million to complete the sale (and the loan is partially forgivable). We know Catholic Health Initiatives — Jewish Hospital’s parent company — will forgive about $19.7 million of what University Hospital owes CHI. CHI and KentuckyOne also won’t be able to open any competing facilities for five years after the deal closes. And the deal is contingent on U of L maintaining Kentucky-based jobs and providing care to west Louisville residents. 

Adrian Cable/WikimediaCommons

The Kentucky State Fair starts on Thursday, and the presenting sponsor will be a hemp production company — a first in the fair’s 115-year history.

State Fair officials named GenCanna as the presenting sponsor in a June 4 announcement, adding that hemp has a promising future in Kentucky. The company will host a booth at the fair with free merchandise, information on partner opportunities and educational information about hemp. State Fair spokesman Ian Cox said the fair board chose GenCanna because of its work promoting Kentucky’s agriculture.

 


Ervins Strauhmanis/Creative Commons

The University of Louisville has announced plans to purchase the KentuckyOne hospital system with the assistance of a $50 million loan from the state’s Economic Development Cabinet.

The deal is contingent upon state lawmakers authorizing it during next year’s legislative session and would amount to the largest loan administered by the cabinet, according to a review of records.

Jack Mazurak, communications director for the Kentucky Economic Development Cabinet, said the state is pursuing the deal because “it’s important that these institutions not be allowed to fail.”

 


Pages

Become a Member Today

LRS Archive

Rob Taber

LRS Live Replay: Nikki Lane, Howlin' Brothers & Leslie Weiler Meng

The season finale of Lost River Sessions LIVE featured Nikki Lane, a Nashville singer-songwriter who blends country, rock and blues. Mike LoPinto played alongside Lane on guitar and she was also joined for part of her set by The Howlin' Brothers and Leslie Weiler Meng.

Read More

Monday Afternoons at 4:45c/5:45e

Exploring the changing economy of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia

Join our mailing list

We'll send you occasional updates about WKU Public Radio