Kate Howard

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn Sunday’s ruling from the 6th Circuit Court Of Appeals and block Gov. Andy Beshear’s executive order that closed private religious K-12 schools.

Beshear’s order, meant to curb the surge in coronavirus, bars all K-12 schools, private and public, from holding in-person classes. Danville Christian Academy filed suit and a federal district court judge granted a request for a preliminary injunction preventing the order from impacting private religious schools. Cameron joined the suit on behalf of Danville Christian and private religious schools across the state.

The district court agreed with Danville Christian and Cameron that the order harmed religious freedoms.

Marty Osbourn, Kentucky Pediatric/Adult Research COO

Kentucky expects to receive about 115,000 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine in two shipments beginning in December.

The commonwealth recorded more cases of COVID-19 in November than at any other point in the pandemic. Medical experts expect those numbers will climb even higher in the coming weeks due to holiday travel, but it appears fortune has begun to turn in the state’s favor.

Kentucky is set to receive 38,000 doses of the Pfizer vaccine in its first shipment and another roughly 76,000 doses of the Moderna vaccine later in December, said Gov. Andy Beshear. That’s about three times fewer doses than the state initially expected to get.

A coronavirus vaccine consists of an initial injection, followed by a booster shot. Beshear said boosters should arrive three weeks after the first batch of shots. Together, medical experts have found these vaccines to be more than 90 percent effective.

“It’s a testament to modern medical science,” said Kentucky Public Health Commissioner Steven Stack.  

Beshear said the first doses of vaccine will go to certain healthcare workers and long-term care facility staff and residents with the goal of reducing deaths. Long-term care residents make up almost two-thirds of COVID-19 deaths and need a higher amount of resources when they are hospitalized.

Thinkstock

After the 2008 recession revealed the weaknesses of the nation’s unemployment insurance systems, most states got to work upgrading their technology.

The need for such an overhaul was obvious, and the reason the federal government set aside $7 billion in 2009 to modernize the nation’s unemployment systems.

Forty states took the free money. But Kentucky left it on the table.


Mark Cornelison

Dr. Kirk Tucker, chief clinical officer of Adena Health Systems in Chillicothe, Ohio, said a week before Thanksgiving that the health system’s three hospitals in southern Ohio were bombarded with coronavirus patients. But it isn’t just the patients testing positive. The virus has also sickened 65 of his fellow caregivers.

Recently, Tucker said, a doctor there in his 60s tested positive for COVID-19 and died the same day of a sudden cardiac event.

“This physician, to my knowledge, did not feel bad,” Tucker said. “As a matter of fact, I saw him the day that this happened.” Tucker said one of the many dangerous things about COVID-19 is that the virus is prothrombotic, meaning it can cause blood clots.


The biotech company Moderna released new data Monday morning that strengthens the case for its COVID-19 vaccine. It concludes the vaccine is 94% effective — and strongly protects against serious illness. Based on these latest findings, the company plans to submit an application for emergency use authorization to the Food and Drug Administration today.

J. Tyler Franklin

Private religious K-12 schools will be expected to close Monday, along with public ones, under a ruling from the U.S Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals handed down on Sunday. The panel of judges overturned a lower court decision that blocked Beshear’s executive order from affecting private religious schools.

The appellate court ruling overturns a prior ruling from U.S. District Court judge Gregory Van Tatenhove that had found Beshear’s order impinged on First Amendment rights to religious freedom. Van Tatenhove had sided with Danville Christian Academy and Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron in their request for a preliminary injunction blocking the order from impacting private religious schools.

In the Sunday ruling, the appellate court disagreed, on the grounds that the order did not specifically target religious schools.

Lisa Autry

If you eventually get vaccinated against the coronavirus, a Western Kentucky University professor had a small hand in helping researchers learn more about how to create an effective vaccine.

Psychological Sciences Professor Matt Woodward took part in biotech company Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine trials

In an interview with WKU Public Radio, Woodward said he's been touched personally by the virus.  His parents and one set of grandparents, living in different states, contracted the virus at the same time shortly after he began participating in the trial.

Woodward took part in the study through Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville.  He says he got two injections one month apart this fall, and has had no side effects.  He's unaware of whether he received the actual vaccine or was in the placebo group.


DNC video

President-elect Joe Biden is planning to reinforce the nation’s refugee resettlement efforts after a dramatic decrease in admissions under President Trump. A Bowling Green-based refugee resettlement agency is hoping to help many more people once Biden becomes president.

Biden wants to set the refugee admission’s cap to 125,000 and then gradually increase that number over time. Under the Obama administration, 110,000 refugees were allowed to resettle. The Trump administration cut admissions to 15,000, the lowest number of refugees coming into the U.S. on record.

Albert Mbanfu, the executive director of the International Center in Bowling Green, said while Biden’s plan is promising, it won’t have an immediate impact. He said due to the limited number of refugees currently being allowed into the country, the resettlement process has slowed drastically.


The Trump legal team has suffered another loss in its continuing attempts to reverse the results of the 2020 presidential election.

In a scathing opinion, a federal appeals court said Friday that a lower court acted properly when it threw out the Trump campaign's challenge to the certification of the election results in Pennsylvania.

WFPL

Kentucky is set to receive about $10 million in federal funds from the Great American Outdoors Act and the Land and Water Conservation Fund for improvements on and the expansion of public lands.  

The funds will help pay for a new roof on the Mammoth Cave Hotel. They’ll also be used to acquire a civil war battle site and lands for wildlife conservation and recreation in the Cumberland Plateau and along the Green River. 

“We continue to make progress to deliver on the purpose of this historic conservation legislation,” said said Margaret Everson, Chair of the Great American Outdoors Act Task Force in a press release. “We carefully evaluated each deferred maintenance project and land acquisition to maximize the return on investment for the American people and deliver on the promises of this unprecedented opportunity.”

Pages

New Weekend Programs Airing on WKU Public Radio

WKU Public Radio

New Weekend Programs Now Airing on WKU Public Radio

WKU Public Radio has some changes coming to our weekend programming lineup, aimed at enhancing the quantity and quality of shows our listeners can expect to hear on Saturdays and Sundays! The decision by American Public Media to halt production of Live From Here has led to some new additions to our weekends, and some changes to when a few current shows air. Starting Saturday, Sept. 19, our regular Saturday lineup will include an hour of Lost River Sessions Radio, the radio companion to the WKYU PBS series Lost River Sessions ; and the music program Mountain Stage .

Read More

Coronavirus Update

Office of Governor Andy Beshear

WATCH: Gov. Beshear's Live News Briefings about COVID-19

The novel coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19, have had an enormous impact on daily life in Kentucky and the world, prompting governments at all levels to respond. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear has been holding semi-regular news briefings about measures being taken in the state to combat the spread of COVID-19. Those briefings are being streamed live at Gov. Beshear's Facebook page and YouTube channel. You can access live webstreaming of the governor's daily news conferences by clicking on the links above.

Read More

Ask Us Your Questions About Coronavirus In The Ohio Valley

Hearken

Ask Us Your Questions About Coronavirus In The Ohio Valley

The Ohio Valley ReSource and its seven partner stations in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia have mobilized to cover the coronavirus pandemic and the profound effects it is having on how we live in the region. This is an anxious, bewildering time, and we know you have a lot of questions. We want to help answer them. Ask your question below and the ReSource reporters will try their best to find an answer.

Read More

Become a Member Today

LRS Archive

Bryan Lemon

LRS Live Replay: Kyshona & Dax Evans

February's Lost River Sessions LIVE show at the Captiol Arts Center in Bowling Green was a special one. Fans saw local singer and songwriter Dax Evans take the stage, performing some heartfelt original songs. Meanwhile, Nashville artist, and former music therapist Kyshona, blessed the venue on the eve of her album release with new music.

Read More

Monday Afternoons at 4:45c/5:45e

Exploring the changing economy of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia

Join our mailing list

We'll send you occasional updates about WKU Public Radio