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Warren County Schools to Hold Limited In-Person Classes Through December

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Fons Cervera
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Warren County Public schools will continue with a hybrid schedule of classes through the end of the calendar year. 

The decision is based, in part, on the state’s new system that tracks the number of coronavirus cases in K-12 schools. 

Under the state’s new metric for reopening schools to in-person classes, Warren County is in the Red category, meaning a daily rate of 25 individuals per 100,000 have a confirmed case of COVID-19. 

Gov. Andy Beshear is recommending any county in the Red category postpone all in-person learning until it reaches Yellow status, meaning less than ten confirmed cases of COVID-19 per 100,000 individuals. 

A statement from Superintendent Rob Clayton says the school system has no information that suggests any student-to-student spread of the virus has occurred within the schools.  He has decided to continue with a hybrid schedule through December 18 when the district breaks for the holidays. 

"Operating a hybrid schedule enables us to sustain social distancing in our classrooms, which not only minimizes the spread of the virus, but limits the number of students being quarantined due to a potential exposure," Clayton said in the statement.

Students are currently attending in-person classes two days a week on an alternating basis and learning from home three days a week.  Students also have the option of all-virtual instruction. 

The Warren County school system has about 18,000 students and 2,5000 employees.  The district has had 42 confirmed cases of the virus since school resumed August 24.

Lisa is a Scottsville native and WKU alum. She has worked in radio as a news reporter and anchor for 18 years. Prior to joining WKU Public Radio, she most recently worked at WHAS in Louisville and WLAC in Nashville. She has received numerous awards from the Associated Press, including Best Reporter in Kentucky. Many of her stories have been heard on NPR.
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