religion

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Muslims worldwide began celebrating the holy month of Ramadan this week.

However, because of social distancing guidelines, gatherings for prayer, the reading of the Quran and the breaking of fast at sundown every day are going to be severely limited.

The Islamic Center of Bowling Green has canceled its scheduled iftar meals, and has moved traditional rituals online. WKU Public Radio spoke with the mosque's leader, Imam Sedin Agic, to learn more.


Some Kentucky churches are having to think creatively ahead of Easter Sunday, which will be unlike any other due to the coronavirus. 

For most Christians, there will be no sunrise services, new spring dresses, large family meals, or egg hunts.  Instead, families will stay home and many churches will do what they have done for the past month by streaming their services through online platforms such as Facebook and YouTube.

Stuart Jones is senior minister of First Christian Church in Elizabethtown, which typically has about 1,000 members who attend its two Sunday morning services.  He said the message will be the same this Easter, despite the unconventional circumstances.

Hillvue Heights Church

Churches across south-central Kentucky are responding to the coronavirus outbreak by following advice from medical professionals and state government to avoid large gatherings.

One of those making adjustments is Hillvue Heights Church in Bowling Green, which has thousands of congregants who attend multiple services througout the week.

But they won’t be gathering in-person for the next two Sundays.

The church will livestream worship services on March 15 and 22 through YouTube and the church’s Facebook page.

Sergio Martinez-Beltran | WPLN

Gov. Bill Lee is defending his decision to declare Oct. 10 a "day of prayer, humility and fasting."

The announcement of the declaration has been received with mixed emotions, and some groups are pushing back on it.

Lee says the idea of a day of prayer is to create unity across the state. 

 


Pike Central High School

A high school in Eastern Kentucky is removing so-called prayer lockers from its hallways after receiving a complaint from a national organization that advocates for the separation of church and state.

Signs on the lockers at Pike Central High say students can slip in pieces of paper with confidential requests for other students to pray for them. The school’s art department and a student posted photos of two prayer lockers on Facebook. One of the posts says the locker is sponsored by the Fellowship of Christian Athletes. The post’s caption also thanks someone who appears to be a teacher at the school for giving students the idea for the prayer locker.

 


Updated at 10:18 a.m. ET

As allegations continue to swirl about the president and a payout to a porn star to cover up a sexual encounter, evangelical leaders are organizing a sit-down with President Trump in June, four sources with knowledge of the planned meeting tell NPR.

Governor: Company Shouldn't Have to Make Gay Pride Shirts

Feb 13, 2018
Flickr/Creative Commons

Kentucky's Republican governor is urging the state's highest court to rule in favor of a company whose owner refused to print T-shirts for a gay rights festival because of his Christian beliefs.

Attorneys for Gov. Matt Bevin have asked to file a brief with the Kentucky Supreme Court in the case involving Hands-On Originals. The company refused an order in 2012 from Lexington's Gay and Lesbian Services Organization for T-shirts in advance of the city's Gay Pride Festival.

Tax Incentive Suspended for Kentucky Noah's Ark Attraction

Jul 22, 2017
Rick Howlett

Kentucky's tourism agency has suspended a tax break worth up to $18 million for a Noah's ark biblical attraction after the park transferred its main property to a nonprofit affiliate.

Media outlets report the Kentucky Tourism Arts and Heritage Cabinet said the park's action breached the incentive agreement, which would refund a portion of sales tax collected at the site.

Ark Encounter transferred land to Crosswater Canyon in June. The tourism agency says Ark Encounter failed to inform the state of any change in ownership or get prior written consent.

Thinkstock

Today is the day that new laws passed earlier this year by the Kentucky General Assembly take effect.

Gov. Matt Bevin signed more than 130 bills into law, dealing with issues ranging from charter schools to drug control to doubling campaign contributions for state politicians.

This year’s legislative session was the first in which Republicans had control of both the state House and Senate as well as the governor’s office.

The Southern Baptist Convention voted to formally "denounce and repudiate" white nationalism and the alt-right movement at the church's annual meeting Wednesday, but only after the denomination's leadership was criticized for initially bypassing the proposal.

President Trump will try to leave his troubles behind as he departs on the first foreign trip of his presidency. It's an ambitious itinerary with stops in Saudi Arabia, Israel and the Vatican and two meetings with European leaders.

Here are five objectives to watch for as Trump goes overseas.

1. Will the cloud of controversy follow?

There has been one "bad news" headline after another involving the Trump administration breaking every day this week. But if the president is looking for a reprieve, recent history indicates he might be disappointed.

Elena Elisseeva/123rf Stock Photo

What supporters call a “Freedom of Religious Expression” bill is before Kentucky House members and likely to get a vote this week. The bill already won overwhelming approval in the Senate. 

Senate Bill 17 spells out permission for school students to voluntarily express religious or political viewpoints In school assignments or activities.

Elizabethtown Representative Tim Moore carried the bill in the House Education Committee. “Students have the same religious liberty to express their viewpoint at school that they do anywhere else. That doesn’t infringe on anyone. That just allows each individual to express their viewpoint and to be people of faith wherever they go," Moore said.

Mary Meehan

Dona Wells walked through what’s left of the EMW Women’s Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky. Boxes fill what use to be offices. Sterilized medical supplies are in disarray. A light flickers on and off in the back hallway. She doesn’t see a point in fixing it. At 75, she still runs 25 miles a week, but Wells is tired.

“I was going to retire anyway, probably this year,” she said. But I wanted to do it on my terms, not Gov. Bevin’s terms.”

That would be Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, who recently signed two bills into law further restricting abortion services: one requiring an ultrasound as part of abortions and another prohibiting the procedure after 20 weeks of pregnancy. The final straw for Wells came in the form of a new license requirement from the state. Wells has been battling restrictive rules for most of the clinic’s 28 years, but the battle is over now. She’s closing the clinic.

Kevin Probst / Wikimedia Commons

Community groups in counties across Kentucky are starting the new year with a Bible reading marathon, which Governor Matt Bevin marked in a proclamation earlier this month. In the proclamation, Bevin declared 2017 “The Year of the Bible.”

The Kentucky 120 United Bible Reading Marathon is a four-day event in which volunteers sign up for time slots to read the Bible from beginning to end. Hopkins County event coordinator Lynda Crick says it is a great way to bring the state together.

Alix Mattingly

A state senator is planning to once again propose a bill during the upcoming legislative session that he says will protect religious freedoms.

The bill would nullify local “fairness” ordinances across the state that protect Kentuckians from discrimination based on sexual orientation. Though it has failed in recent years, the measure will have a better chance during the upcoming General Assembly when both the legislature and governor’s office will be controlled by Republicans for the first time in state history.

Sen. Al Robinson, a Republican from London and sponsor of the “religious freedom” bill in previous years, said he’s not concerned with backlash like North Carolina has seen after passing similar legislation.

“There’s more people that are backing down when they should not be backing down for the sake of the threats and the financial threats,” Robinson said. “And to me there’s some price that’s just not worth paying.”

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