Kentucky Attorney General

City of Bowling Green

Cleanup from the Dec. 10-11 tornadoes that tore through Bowling Green and parts of western Kentucky will take months.

While the working is just beginning, storm victims are being encouraged to guard against hiring unreliable contractors. 

Telia Butler is the Downtown Development Coordinator for the city of Bowling Green. She told WKU Public Radio that all legitimate contractors are issued an official license, and before starting any repairs, the public should ask a contractor to present their license.

“All licensed contractors valid in Bowling Green and Warren County receive a license certificate that’s a yellow piece of paper that has their license number on it," Butler said.

The license number is printed in the upper righthand corner of the certificate.

Kate Howard

Moments after Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron acknowledged a grand jury wasn’t charging the police officers who killed Breonna Taylor for her death, he made a promise.

He stood at a podium last September, surrounded by reporters from across the world, and pledged to form a task force to review the process for securing and executing search warrants like the one that led to Taylor’s death.

Cameron indicated a sense of urgency, saying he would issue an executive order “in the coming days.”

But that didn’t happen until four months later. And nearly eight months later, the task force has yet to even meet.

Alan Simpson

A Kentucky attorney says he believes the grand jury that decided whether to bring charges against the police officers who killed Breonna Taylor made the right decision based on the facts that have been made public in the case. 

A Jefferson County grand jury this week indicted former Louisville police detective Brett Hankison, who was one of the officers at Taylor’s apartment in March to serve a search warrant.  Taylor’s boyfriend said he believed they were intruders and fired at police first. 

Hankison was only indicted on wanton endangerment for firing shots that ended up striking a neighbor’s apartment.  He was not indicted in Taylor’s death.  Attorney General Daniel Cameron said that there wasn’t sufficient evidence to suggest any of the bullets Hankison fired hit Taylor.  The two other officers involved in the drug raid were not indicted. 


Daniel Cameron

The police-related deaths of George Floyd and Louisville resident Breonna Taylor have sparked mass protests in recent weeks.

The Minneapolis officers involved in Floyd's death are facing prosecution.

During a recent conversation, Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron gave an update on whether Louisville Metro Police Department officers involved in Taylor's death will also face charges.


Thinkstock

Kentucky’s attorney general has joined Indiana, Tennessee, and 15 other states in urging a federal appeals court to uphold an Ohio law that bans abortions when the unborn child has Down Syndrome. 

Attorney General Daniel Cameron has filed an amicus brief in the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals.  A three-judge panel initially invalidated Ohio’s law, but the entire Sixth Circuit, which has more than a dozen judges, recently agreed to rehear the case. 

The brief argues while current law allows a woman to have an abortion, she doesn’t have the right to decide whether a child lives or dies based on a perceived disability.  The brief says those types of abortions are discriminatory against the unborn child. 


Kyeland Jackson

Daniel Cameron has been sworn in as Kentucky’s next attorney general. He is the first Republican to hold the office since 1948 and the first African American elected on his own ticket to statewide office.

Cameron was supposed to take office on January 6, but started early after newly-elected Gov. Andy Beshear appointed him to fill a vacancy in the office. Beshear, a Democrat, was the previous attorney general and was inaugurated as Kentucky’s 63rd governor on December 10.


thinkstock

Polls open on Tuesday, November 5 at 6 a.m. and close at 6 p.m local time. If you’re in line at 6 p.m., you will be allowed to vote. You can view your sample ballot by going to the Kentucky Secretary of State's website.

If you’re wondering if you’re registered to vote in Kentucky (and hopefully you are, because the deadline to register and still vote in November was last month!) you can check on the Secretary of State’s website.

Acceptable forms of identification include a driver’s license, credit card, social security card, personal acquaintance of an Election Officer, any other identification with both your picture and signature, or any U.S. government-issued ID card.

Daniel Cameron

A judge says that Republican attorney general candidate Daniel Cameron will appear on the November ballot, ruling against a lawsuit that claimed Cameron did not have the required years of experience for the office.

Louisville resident Joseph Jackson filed the lawsuit last month, arguing that the two years Cameron spent as a clerk for a federal judge should not count as years spent as a practicing attorney.


Daniel Cameron Wins Republican Attorney General Primary

May 22, 2019
Daniel Cameron

The former legal counsel for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has clinched the Republican nomination for attorney general after a barb-fueled primary race.

Daniel Cameron has said he will fight for pro-life policies, combat the state’s opioid epidemic and end the partisan divide between the Democratic attorney general’s office and the Republican-led Legislature.

He will face former Attorney General Greg Stumbo, the Democratic candidate for the office who ran unopposed for the nomination.

Kentucky’s attorney general is taking the nation’s three largest insulin manufacturers to court over rising drug prices. 

Beshear has filed a lawsuit in Franklin Circuit Court against Eli Lilly, Sanofi-Aventis, and Novo Nordisk.  The three defendants control 96 percent of the world’s insulin market.  

Beshear says the companies have increased the price of their insulin products at least ten times while production costs have remained low, usually less than seven dollars per vial.  The wholesale price has jumped to nearly $300 and the price paid by some Kentuckians can exceed $1,000 a month.

Creative Commons

The state Attorney General’s Office is issuing a scam alert after several Kentuckians reported losing money to two computer virus scams. 

In the last two months, the attorney general’s office has received complaints from Kentuckians in Daviess, Fayette, Franklin, Jefferson, and Johnson counties with losses totaling more than $92,000. 

A Jefferson County victim alone lost $89,000 and, so far, hasn't been able to recover the stolen funds.

A program born out of Kentucky’s opioid crisis is putting drug offenders into treatment faster and reducing the cost of incarceration.

The Rocket Docket initiative allows local prosecutors to expedite non-violent felony drug cases through the judicial process.  It also allows certain defendants rapid entry into substance abuse treatment. 

The Prosecutors Advisory Council in the Kentucky Attorney General’s Office recently issued a report examining Rocket Docket in the three-and-a-half years since the program began.

Kentucky LRC

State Sen. Whitney Westerfield has dropped out of the race for Kentucky attorney general, citing time constraints from his role in the legislature.

Westerfield is the Republican chair of the Senate’s judiciary committee and narrowly lost a race for attorney general to Democrat Andy Beshear in 2015.

In a statement, Westerfield said running for the state’s top legal officer is “no longer feasible at this time.”

“I have been overwhelmed by the support I received during this campaign, but this decision will hopefully give another qualified candidate the opportunity to run their campaign as it should be run,” Westerfield said.

David Brinkley

Andy Beshear is looking back on the past year as Kentucky’s chief law enforcement officer.  Much of it was spent in the courtroom with the most high-profile legal action taken against Governor Matt Bevin’s controversial pension reform law. 

The Attorney General also took on the pharmaceutical industry and some public universities, including WKU.  Beshear sat down with WKU Public Radio for an interview on those legal challenges and what he wants to accomplish in his last year in the AG’s office.

Kentucky AG Opposes Ruling Striking Down Health Care Law

Dec 17, 2018
Ryland Barton

Heading into a 2019 race for governor, Kentucky's Democratic Attorney General said Monday he will have a "more vocal" role in appealing a recent federal court ruling that struck down a federal law giving government-funded health coverage to more than 400,000 Kentuckians.

The Friday ruling from Texas U.S. District Judge Reed O'Connor likely won't take effect while the case enters a lengthy appeals process. But the decision ensures health care, specifically Medicaid, will stay in focus during one of the nation's three governor's races next year.

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