Nashville

Authorities in Nashville, Tenn., said four people were killed and 130 rescued after near-record levels of rainfall caused significant flooding across the region.

The Nashville Office of Emergency Management said in a Sunday morning update that emergency responders were continuing to make rescues in the aftermath of the storm, which drenched the area in a total of 7 inches of rain.

More than a year before the explosion that rocked Nashville last week, Anthony Warner's girlfriend told police that he "was building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence," according to a police report filed in August 2019.

Yet the report indicates Nashville police never made contact with Warner. Despite having the report in their database, police did not share it with the public until Tuesday evening — four days after Warner drove his RV to downtown Nashville, Tenn., and detonated a bomb out of the vehicle, killing himself and injuring at least seven people.

TBI: Nashville Bomber’s Relatives Are Cooperating With Investigation

Dec 29, 2020
FBI

Investigators say the friends and family of Anthony Warner are cooperating as they try to piece together the motive behind the bombing in downtown Nashville on Christmas morning.

The 63-year-old Antioch resident died in the blast and is the only suspect. But law enforcement are still not sure why Warner decided to blow up his recreational vehicle on Second Avenue.

TBI director David Rausch says they’ve spoken to Warner’s mother, among other people. One question they’re asking is whether he had a fear of the new cellphone technology known as 5G.

needpix.com

Kentucky school districts have had their internet access restored after a Christmas Day bombing in Nashville knocked out networks across the region. 

The explosion damaged an AT&T building causing widespread service outages across the region including in Tennessee, Alabama, Kentucky and Indiana. 

The network was down this weekend for nearly 60 Kentucky school districts, along with the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) offices in Frankfort, according to KDE spokeswoman Toni Konz Tatman. 

“This appears to be concentrated basically in central Kentucky and far western Kentucky,” she said. “Though it did reach Anchorage Independent up in Louisville.”

Updated at 2:25 a.m. ET on Monday

The violent explosion that rocked downtown Nashville, Tenn., on Christmas morning is believed to be a suicide bombing by Anthony Q. Warner, 63, U.S. Attorney Don Cochran said Sunday.

Authorities continue to ask those who knew or encountered the suspect to contact the FBI. The agency is still investigating, but there is no indication that anyone else was involved, Cochran said.

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

An early-morning explosion ripped through downtown Nashville on Friday, injuring at least three people, shattering windows and damaging buildings.

Authorities believe the explosion was "an intentional act."

Police responded to reports of shots fired in the area at about 5:30 a.m. CT, when they encountered a recreational vehicle parked in front of the downtown AT&T building.

Rachel Iacovone | WPLN News

Twenty-eight people were arrested Saturday night in Nashville, and another man was taken into custody on suspected arson Sunday evening, after a peaceful rally turned chaotic. Protestors set fires in the Metro Courthouse, broke windows, graffitied buildings and vandalized business along Lower Broadway.

Nashville Mayor John Cooper declared a state of emergency and imposed an 8 p.m. curfew Sunday night. The curfew will be in effect until 6 a.m. Monday.

Updated 9:20 p.m. ET

Tornadoes gashed through central Tennessee early Tuesday, with the worst damage concentrated in and around Nashville. The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency says at least 24 people were killed across four counties, and there are fears the death toll could climb as first responders continue to search for victims.

Nashville Mayor Megan Barry has admitted that she had an extramarital affair with the former head of her security detail.

"I'm embarrassed, and I am sad, and I am so sorry for all the pain that I have caused my family and his family," she said at a news conference Wednesday. "I know that God will forgive me, but that Nashville doesn't have to. ... I hope that I can earn your trust back and that you will forgive me."

The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tenn., is country music's Holy Land. It's home to the weekly radio show that put country music on the national map in 1925. And it's where this summer, 30 people with Williams syndrome eagerly arrived backstage.

Danielle Atkins /Courtesy of Spring House Press

Nashville Hot Chicken is showing up everywhere lately, from fast-food marquees to trendy restaurant menus. But to find the real thing, you might start in a nondescript strip mall on the northeast side of Nashville, Tenn.

Here at Prince's Hot Chicken Shack, people line up long before the doors open to get their fix.

"Need my hot chicken," says construction worker Jose Rodriquez as he approaches the kitchen window to place his order. "I'm going to get two hot of the breast quarters."

Old-fashioned wooden booths line the walls of the small dining room. When a clerk calls out your order number, you pick up your paper plate of chicken, served on a red cafeteria tray. Drinks come from a vending machine on the back wall.

"Prince's is the ground zero for hot chicken," says Timothy Davis, author of The Hot Chicken Cookbook – the Fiery History and Red Hot Recipes of Nashville's Beloved Bird.

Country music fans most associate the Ryman Auditorium with Grand Ole Opry, a live radio show broadcast from the Ryman for more than 30 years, starting in 1943. It was on the Ryman stage that bluegrass was born.

Ryman general manager Sally Williams says that most museums display artifacts, but this building is the artifact. "I think the Ryman is living history," she says. The space was the showcase of the South long before the Opry days, and the $14 million expansion is designed to better tell that backstory.

Schools don't like to use the V-word anymore — "vocational," as in "vocational education." Administrators say the word is outdated, along with the idea of offering job-training courses only to students who are going straight into the workforce.

Nashville, Tenn., is trying a new approach. The public school system there is encouraging every high school student, regardless of college plans, to take three career-training classes before they graduate.

Homeless In Nashville, Huge In Sweden

Oct 9, 2014

Country music fans were introduced to a new face at last month's Americana Music Awards in Nashville, when 62-year-old Doug Seegers opened the show with a song from his debut album, Going Down to the River.

Seegers is originally from Long Island, N.Y., but says he wanted to be a country singer from Day One. He wrote his first song at 16, and, after finishing high school, joined a country band and moved to Austin, Texas, performing under the stage name Duke the Drifter.

Komodo Dragons On Display At Nashville Zoo

Jul 16, 2014

There are less than 2,500 Komodo dragons — the world’s largest living lizards — left in the wild.

The venomous beasts can spend hours in one spot, waiting for a deer, boar, goat or anything sizable and nutritious. By the time the reach adulthood, they can be over 10 feet long and more than 350 pounds.

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