NRA

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

The attorney general of New York took action Thursday to dissolve the National Rifle Association following an 18-month investigation that found evidence the powerful gun rights group is "fraught with fraud and abuse."

Attorney General Letitia James claims in a lawsuit filed Thursday that she found financial misconduct in the millions of dollars and that it contributed to a loss of more than $64 million over a three-year period.

Lisa Autry

A vast majority of Kentucky’s 120 counties are now considered Second Amendment sanctuaries.  Leaders in those counties have re-affirmed their oath to uphold the Constitution when it comes to the right to bear arms, but what’s known as the "2A Movement" has hit the brakes in Daviess County.  

Jason Potts is a certified public accountant, and it’s tax season.  You could say he’s blowing off a little steam at Rock Hill Range in Daviess County.  He brought with him his AR-15, and two semi-automatic handguns for target practice. He says shooting is in his blood.

"I’m 45, and my entire life I’ve been a gun owner," said Potts. "My dad was in the Army, I grew up around it, and I grew up hunting with him.”


Updated at 4:04 p.m. ET

The National Rifle Association acted as a "foreign asset" for Russia in the period leading up to the 2016 election, according to a new investigation unveiled Friday by Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.

Drawing on contemporaneous emails and private interviews, an 18-month probe by the Senate Finance Committee's Democratic staff found that the NRA underwrote political access for Russian nationals Maria Butina and Alexander Torshin more than previously known — even though the two had declared their ties to the Kremlin.

Matt Markgraf

Retired Marine Lt. Col. Oliver North was greeted with a standing applause welcome at a Republican rally Friday night at a rally at Murray State University.

The Lakeland GOP rally organizers say more than 300 people attended the event, walking past a crowd of protesters into Lovett Auditorium, where a large U.S. flag extended across the stage. The "Night Before Fancy Farm" was hosted by the Calloway and Marshall Republican parties and was one of several political rallies across the west Kentucky region ahead of the annual Fancy Farm Picnic in Graves County, which kicks off the election season in the commonwealth.

Taylor Inman

Survivors of gun violence in west Kentucky led protests against the Friday visit of National Rifle Association leader Oliver North to a Republican rally at Murray State University.

Oliver North was invited by the Marshall and Calloway County Republican parties as the featured speaker for their ‘Night Before Fancy Farm’ event. The invitation of North to speak at a local GOP rally sparked an uproar from a community that experienced a deadly school shooting less than seven months ago.

North is a retired Marine Lieutenant Colonel and in May was named the next president of the NRA. He is also infamous for his involvement in the Iran-Contra scandal.

J. Tyler Franklin

The annual Fancy Farm political speaking event takes place this weekend, signaling the unofficial kickoff of the fall election season in Kentucky.

The festival is a fundraiser for St. Jerome’s Catholic Church in the Graves County town of Fancy Farm in far-western Kentucky.

For more than a century the event has attracted Kentucky politicians trying to sway voters and in recent decades has evolved into a raucous affair where speakers insult and tease opponents while the crowd heckles and chants.

Nicole Erwin

Gun rights and gun violence have dominated national and regional headlines this year, following several shootings, including the deadly shooting last January at Marshall County High School in west Kentucky.

Now, as 3-D printed guns could potentially upend the national conversation, and as the president of the National Rifle Association visits the region on Friday, the Paducah/west Kentucky chapter of the nonpartisan group Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense In America is looking to build consensus on gun safety. Christa Dubrock is the group's Local Lead for Paducah. 

Matt Markgraf

Murray State University is closing early on Friday to accommodate an increased number of visitors for a Republican event featuring National Rifle Association President Oliver North.  

The Republican parties of Marshall and Calloway counties are hosting "The Night Before Fancy Farm." The doors open at 6 p.m. and the event begins at 7 in Lovett Auditorium on the main campus. According to a release, Murray State is closing all campuses from 3 p.m. to 9:30. The university is expecting a large number of visitors on the main campus and is locking all doors south of the Curris Center by 3 p.m. for security purposes.

Lisa Autry

You could call it Walkout Wednesday at high schools all over Kentucky-students leaving class in solidarity to end gun violence.

“This protest is not about leaving your class," said Jack Eason, president of the Young Democrats Club at Bowling Green High School. "It’s about sending a message to Frankfort, to Washington DC, that we’re not going to put up with this anymore.”

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL News

Despite his failed presidential run, Sen. Rand Paul easily won the Republican nomination for reelection to his Senate seat last week.

Paul said he would support his former rival in the presidential race — Donald Trump — in the likely case that the New York businessman is the party’s nominee. But during an interview at last week’s NRA conference in Louisville, Paul said Trump “has a ways to go” to unite the Republican Party behind him.

“But I think he’s heading in the right direction,” Paul added.

Trump is the only candidate remaining in the Republican nominating contest. He’s been working to unite GOP leaders who have been skeptical of his candidacy and conservative credentials.

Some Republicans have questioned Trump’s support of gun rights; he worked to solidify his qualifications at the Louisville NRA event, calling for the elimination of gun-free zones and bashing likely Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s record on guns.

J. Tyler Franklin

Top Republicans including Donald Trump, House Speaker Paul Ryan, Sen. Mitch McConnell and Gov. Matt Bevin will all speak at the National Rifle Association annual meeting in Louisville Friday.

In a conference call on Thursday, Congressman John Yarmuth, a Democrat from Louisville, criticized Trump’s attendance at the event, saying that he was “one of the most incredible panderers.”

“Pandering to the worst instincts of America — xenophobia, anti-Muslim sentiment, anti-immigrant sentiment, misogyny — this is why I think he is singularly unqualified to be president of the United States,” Yarmuth said. “I hope that during his appearance in Louisville there is an enormous outpouring of opposition.”

The NRA convention is expected to draw more than 70,000 people over the weekend and features 8,000 exhibitors.

Kevin Willis

The lobbying wing of the National Rifle Association has sent a mailer to some residents in Kentucky that says Senator Mitch McConnell will stop the “gun control agenda” of President Obama and former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg.  

It hit mailboxes shortly after it was revealed that McConnell’s wife, Elaine Chao, sits on the board of a charity run by Bloomberg.

The mail piece came from the NRA Institute for Legislative Action, and by law cannot be authorized by a candidate or candidate’s committee. Featuring on the front photos of Bloomberg and President Obama, with a dark, grainy picture of New York City in the background, the mailer says “Restricting Your Second Amendment Rights is Obama’s Unfinished Business.”

The back features a picture of McConnell, with assurances that the incumbent Republican opposes “any bans on guns and ammunition”, “a federal gun registration database”, and what it describes as the President’s “anti-gun nominees for the U.S. Supreme Court.”

The NRA’s criticism of Bloomberg’s gun control views comes as McConnell was recently forced to answer questions about his wife’s role on the board of Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Abbey Oldham

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell has bagged an award from the powerful National Rifle Association, giving him bragging rights for his re-election bid next year in a state where hunting is a tradition. The Republican's opponents are defending their own gun-rights stands in the campaign cross-fire.

Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes points to her NRA membership and says she'd welcome McConnell to shoot with her at a gun range.
 
McConnell didn't respond to a reporter's question Friday asking if he'd take Grimes up on her offer.

Rand Paul Doubles Down on Gun Control Fight

Apr 3, 2013

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is lending his name to a conservative gun rights group that's targeting fellow Republicans.

The group, the National Association for Gun Rights, is running ads against two Congressmen in Virginia, including House Minority leader Eric Cantor, saying they gave in too easily to President Obama's gun control measures. They also say the National Rifle Association is too willing to compromise on gun rights.

NRA To Hold 2016 Convention in Kentucky

Feb 1, 2013
flickr

The National Rifle Association is returning to Louisville for its national convention in 2016.

The event is expected to draw more than 70,000 visitors as well as national politicians and pundits during that presidential election year.

The NRA held its 2008 convention in Louisville. That was also an election year and the convention heard speeches from John McCain, Mike Huckabee and Karl Rove.

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