Iran

Updated at 3:18 p.m. ET

The Senate approved a bipartisan resolution to curb the president's war powers when it comes to Iran — a rare rebuke and effort to reassert Congress' authority,

The vote was 55-45 — with eight Republicans joining all Democrats to pass the measure. The tally fell far short of the two-thirds needed to override a presidential veto.

J. Tyler Franklin

Rand Paul of Kentucky is one of at least two Republican U.S. Senators supporting a Democratic resolution aimed at curbing President Trump's ability to launch future military strikes against Iran.

Sen. Paul and Mike Lee of Utah have publicly backed the resolution, which would place a 30-day deadline on the President to seek authorization from Congress for military action, except in a case of an imminent threat.

Politico reports the Senate version of the resolution could be introduced as early as next week.

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says her chamber will vote Thursday on its version of a resolution seeking to curtail Trump's actions against Iran.

Updated at 5 p.m. ET

President Trump said that Iran appears "to be standing down" after Tuesday night's missile attack in Iraq and that "the American people should be extremely grateful and happy no Americans were harmed."

Trump, in a nationally televised address from the White House, also announced a new round of what he termed "punishing economic sanctions" against the Iranian government. And he called on NATO to become "much more involved in the Middle East process."

Updated at 10:03 p.m. ET

Iran has launched more than a dozen ballistic missiles against U.S. military and coalition forces, targeting at least two military bases in Iraq, the U.S. Defense Department announced late Tuesday.

The strikes on military and coalition personnel at the Ain al-Assad air base in Anbar province and in Irbil — at the center of Iraq's Kurdistan region — began at approximately 5:30 p.m. ET, according to a statement.

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif defended the strike, saying it was an act of "self-defense."

Updated at 7:19 p.m. ET

Congressional Democrats are promising to act this week to limit President Trump's ability to unilaterally order military action against Iran.

In a letter to House Democrats, Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., called last week's drone airstrike against Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani "provocative and disproportionate," saying the strike "endangered our servicemembers, diplomats and others by risking a serious escalation of tensions with Iran."

Ron Cogswell with permission via Creative Commons

Kentucky's two U.S. Senators and members of the U.S. House are reacting to the U.S. drone strike that killed the leading Iranian military leader, Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani.

U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell

In a speech on the Senate floor Friday, the Republican Majority Leader strongly supported the killing of Soleimani. 

“This morning Iran’s master terrorist is dead," McConnell said. "The architect and chief engineer of the world’s most active state sponsor of terroism has been removed from the battlefield at the hand of the United States military. No man alive was more directly responsible for the deaths of more American service members than Qasem Soleimani."

Updated at 4:27 a.m. ET Friday

U.S. forces assassinated Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani in an airstrike early Friday near the Baghdad International Airport, an escalation of tensions between Washington and Tehran that is prompting concerns of further violence in the region.

Becca Schimmel

Republican Congressman Brett Guthrie spoke about immigration, diversity and military relations with Iran while in Bowling Green on Friday. He said the negative rhetoric about immigration needs to stop on both sides of the aisle. The Congressman sees it as an impediment to diversifying the Republican party.

Guthrie’s district includes Bowling Green, which is one of the largest refugee resettlement areas in the nation. He said that’s been a big advantage for the community. 

The Congressman pointed out that the Democratic party is a lot more diverse than the GOP, and the rhetoric around immigration isn’t helping his party attract people of color. 


Updated at 6:36 p.m. ET

President Trump announced Tuesday that he has decided to exit a 2015 multinational agreement in which Iran agreed to limit its production of nuclear weapons material.

"I am announcing today that the United States will withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal," Trump said.

He said the U.S. will reimpose economic sanctions that were lifted as part of the U.S. commitments made in the deal.