insurrection

Updated at 6:58 p.m. ET

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said the sole article of impeachment for incitement to insurrection against former President Donald Trump will be delivered to the Senate on Monday and a trial against the Republican will begin the week of Feb. 8.

"The Senate will conduct a trial on the impeachment of Donald Trump," Schumer said Friday on the Senate floor. "It will be a fair trial. But make no mistake, there will be a trial."

Sydney Boles

On his last day as senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell directly tied the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol to outgoing President Donald Trump.

“The mob was fed lies,” McConnell said in a speech on the Senate Floor. “They were provoked by the president and other powerful people.”

The statement was the first time McConnell publicly blamed Trump for the insurrection, though he had gotten close in the hours after the riot when he warned of a democratic death spiral “if this election were overturned by mere allegations from the losing side.”

 

  

FBI

Law enforcement agencies have charged several people with Kentucky ties for their alleged role in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. All face federal charges.

Law enforcement arrested Kentucky resident Robert Bauer on Jan. 15 for illegally and violently entering the Capitol and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. According to an FBI statement, Bauer told investigators he and his cousin were at the rally for President Donald Trump, when they began marching toward the Capitol “because President Trump said to do so.” 

Video and photos from Bauer’s phone shows Bauer inside the Capitol with the rioters. According to the FBI statement, Bauer told investigators “he did not think he had done anything wrong and according to him, there were no signs posted stating that he could not enter the U.S. Capitol building.” He also denied knowing that Congress was in session, and said his purpose for entering the building was to “occupy the space.”

Kentucky National Guard

Hundreds of Kentucky National Guard troops are in Washington D.C. this week to provide support for the Jan. 20 inauguration of President-Elect Joe Biden.

Gov. Andy Beshear authorized the Guard support after a request from the National Guard Bureau following unrest in the U.S. Capitol earlier this month, as well as the prospect of potential armed protests at state capitols across the nation

The 270 Kentucky National Guard soldiers and airmen remain under the control of Gov. Beshear while they are deployed. 

Beshear says Guard members will also be on standby to protect the state capitol on Inauguration Day.   

As Civilian Law Enforcement Officers, the Kentucky National Guard provides support to civil authorities for immediate response, food service assistance and chaplain care. 


Jared Bennett

State capitals nationwide boosted security Sunday after the FBI warned of armed protests planned in all 50 states. But the Capitol building in Frankfort was all quiet Sunday afternoon, with media and law enforcement vastly outnumbering a few people who tried to enter the grounds and were turned away.

The Capitol grounds were closed Sunday, with only police cars and military vehicles allowed near the building. Kentucky State Police Sgt. Billy Gregory said they are prepared for whatever may happen, but have seen no activity yet. They’re not aware of any specific plans and no permits have been given, but the Capitol grounds are closed and the National Guard and KSP are on standby.

Asked if he thinks the 35-degree, wet weather is discouraging people from showing up, Gregory said, “Would you be here if you didn’t have to be?”

Last Wednesday, just before a mob of pro-Trump extremists stormed the U.S. Capitol in an insurrection that left five dead, the president stood before a huge crowd gathered in front of the White House for a so-called "Save America" rally.

Trump whipped up his supporters, repeating a false claim that he has made over and over in the weeks since Nov. 3: "We won this election, and we won it by a landslide," he insisted. "This was not a close election!"

Beshear: Kentucky State Capitol Grounds to Close Sunday

Jan 15, 2021
Thinkstock

Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear says areas near the Kentucky State Capitol in Frankfort will be closed on Sunday in anticipation of upcoming demonstrations at statehouses nationwide.

The governor says that “there are no gatherings or rallies that can or should be happening” over the weekend, because authorities have not received requests for permits for protests at the state capitol.

He has also authorized the Kentucky National Guard to support efforts by Kentucky State Police and Frankfort Police to protect the Capitol and surrounding areas.

Kentucky’s top GOP lawmakers issued a joint statement Friday urging protests to remain peaceful.

Updated at 3:05 p.m. ET

The top federal prosecutor for the District of Columbia said Friday that investigators have not uncovered direct evidence at this point of any "kill/capture teams" targeting elected officials during the U.S. Capitol insurrection, contradicting allegations made earlier by federal prosecutors in Arizona.

U.S. prosecutors in Arizona said Thursday in a court filing against Jacob Chansley, also known as the "QAnon Shaman," that they have "strong evidence" members of the pro-Trump mob wanted to "capture and assassinate" officials.

One week after a violent mob breached the U.S. Capitol, threatened lawmakers and forced evacuations, members returned to the House floor. What followed was an emotional, and often angry, debate about recrimination for the president who many argued incited the riot that resulted in five dead.

Updated at 7:13 p.m. ET

The House of Representatives voted Wednesday to impeach President Trump for "high crimes and misdemeanors" — specifically, for inciting an insurrection against the federal government at the U.S. Capitol.

Just one week before he will leave office, Trump has now become the first U.S. president to be impeached twice.

Wednesday's vote came a week after Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in a chaotic scene that left five people dead.

Update at 5 p.m. ET: Special coverage of this event has ended. Follow more updates on NPR.org.

The House of Representatives passed an article of impeachment against President Trump on Wednesday, making him the first president in U.S. history to be impeached twice.

Updated 5:45 p.m. ET

With nine days left before President Trump's term comes to an end, the House of Representatives is forging ahead with plans to try to remove the president from office over his role in his supporters' violent attack last week on the U.S. Capitol.

The acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, Michael Sherwin, says "hundreds" of people may ultimately face charges related to the storming of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, which interrupted a session of Congress and left five people dead.

Sherwin spoke with NPR's Martin Kaste in an exclusive interview Saturday evening about the multiagency investigation, the challenges officials face and what they'll be looking for.

The violence at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday was unprecedented in modern U.S. history — but some pro-Trump extremists are promising it was just a taste of things to come.

"Many of Us will return on January 19, 2021, carrying Our weapons, in support of Our nation's resolve, towhich [sic] the world will never forget!!!" one person wrote on Parler, a site friendly to right-wing extremists. "We will come in numbers that no standing army or police agency can match."

Updated Saturday at 10:14 a.m. ET

Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate and state Sen. Amanda Chase is facing calls to resign after attending the pro-Trump rally in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. Chase addressed a crowd at the event but said she departed "just in time" before a mob began to riot and force its way into the U.S. Capitol.

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