Domenico Montanaro

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.

Montanaro joined NPR in 2015 and oversaw coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign, including for broadcast and digital.

Before joining NPR, Montanaro served as political director and senior producer for politics and law at PBS NewsHour. There, he led domestic political and legal coverage, which included the 2014 midterm elections, the Supreme Court, and the unrest in Ferguson, Mo.

Prior to PBS NewsHour, Montanaro was deputy political editor at NBC News, where he covered two presidential elections and reported and edited for the network's political blog, "First Read." He has also worked at CBS News, ABC News, The Asbury Park Press in New Jersey, and taught high school English.

Montanaro earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Delaware and a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University.

A native of Queens, N.Y., Montanaro is a life-long Mets fan and college basketball junkie.

President Biden and his team have been making a simple case for why Republican elected officials should support his roughly $2 trillion infrastructure plan: Lawmakers might not like it, but their voters do.

"Overwhelmingly, the majority of the American people — Democrats, Republicans and independents — support infrastructure investments that meets the moment," Biden said last week. "So, I urge the Congress: Listen to your constituents and, together, we can lay a foundation for an economy that works for everyone and allows America to remain the world leader."

When Major League Baseball decided to move its All-Star Game out of Georgia because of the state's new restrictive voting law, it became the latest in a line of political boycotts.

President Biden's infrastructure train is leaving the station.

In remarks Wednesday pushing for his sweeping $2.3 trillion plan, Biden said he wants to meet with Republicans about it and hopes to negotiate in "good faith" — a political tenet that hasn't been practiced much in Washington, D.C., in recent years.

But Biden is not waiting around.

"We will not be open to doing nothing," the president said. "Inaction, simply, is not an option."

Translation: Get on board or step aside.

Updated March 31, 2021 at 5:31 PM ET

The country's infrastructure is badly in need of repair, both major parties agree. But for years they haven't been able to agree on a proposal, or how to pay for it.

Americans say President Biden is faring well when it comes to his handling of the coronavirus pandemic and, to a lesser extent, the economy, a new NPR/Marist poll finds. But immigration looks like it will continue to be a thorn in the president's side.

Two months into office, President Biden will give his first news conference as president on Thursday.

In recent days, Biden and other members of the first families have toured the country, touting his newly signed $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan.

Relevance is important in politics — and it can be fleeting.

That presents a challenge to a former president who might be seeking a return to the office but is banned from some of the largest social media platforms in the world, including Twitter and Facebook.

So it's perhaps no surprise then that Donald Trump is teasing the possibility of launching his own social media platform.

Many Democrats hope President Biden's endorsement of changing the Senate filibuster, to one in which a senator actually has to talk for potentially hours on end, could mean greasing the wheels for major progressive priorities.

"You have to do it," Biden, a former longtime senator, said during an ABC interview that aired Tuesday night.

Republicans and supporters of Donald Trump are the least likely to say they will seek a COVID-19 vaccine when one becomes available to them.

That has led to calls for the former president to speak out more forcefully to encourage his supporters to get vaccinated.

"I think it's very important for former President Trump, as well as the [former] vice president [Mike Pence], to actively encourage all of their followers to get the vaccine," Adm. Brett Giroir, who was the coronavirus testing czar in the Trump administration, said Monday afternoon on CNN.

Now that Democrats have passed President Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID relief bill, all eyes turn to what's next.

But what that is isn't exactly clear.

"I would expect the president's agenda, moving forward, will reflect the Build Back Better agenda that he talked about on the campaign trail," White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Thursday. "But the order, the size, the timeline has not yet been determined."

Updated March 11, 2021 at 9:34 PM ET

President Biden is aiming for the country to begin to find a degree of normalcy and begin to move on from the coronavirus pandemic by the July Fourth holiday, Biden announced in his first prime-time address Thursday night from the White House on the one-year anniversary of the pandemic.

Updated March 11, 2021 at 12:28 PM ET

There is no more pressing issue for the U.S. — or the world — right now than the COVID-19 pandemic.

And politically, how President Biden is perceived to be handling it over the next year or so could define his presidency and his chances for reelection, if he runs.

Updated March 9, 2021 at 4:10 PM ET

The latest Trump-versus-The-Establishment skirmish is over one of the things couples fight about most.

Money.

When the annual Conservative Political Action Conference — CPAC for short — kicks off Thursday in Orlando, Fla., it might as well be called TPAC.

That's because this year, it is all about Trump.

The former president will headline the event with a Sunday afternoon keynote address, his first speech since leaving office last month.

Joe Biden has now been president for one month.

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