Meg Anderson

Meg Anderson is an assistant producer on NPR's Investigations team, where she shapes the team's groundbreaking work for radio, digital and social platforms. She served as a producer on the Peabody Award-winning series Lost Mothers, which investigated the high rate of maternal mortality in the United States. She also does her own original reporting for the team, including the series Heat and Health in American Cities, which won multiple awards, and the story of a COVID-19 outbreak in a Black community and the systemic factors at play. She also completed a fellowship as a local reporter for WAMU, the public radio station for Washington, D.C. Before joining the Investigations team, she worked on NPR's politics desk, education desk and on Morning Edition. Her roots are in the Midwest, where she graduated with a Master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

The controversial whistleblower organization WikiLeaks on Friday released emails that they say are linked to Hillary Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta.

L: Ralph Freso R: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The vice presidential nominees, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, will meet on the debate stage Tuesday.

It’ll be two traditional politicians facing off in a non-traditional election year: Kaine as the safe and even boring choice by Hillary Clinton and Pence as the calm, unflappable balance to Donald Trump’s bombast.

When it comes to the issues, Kaine and Clinton mostly agree. Among other things, they want to raise taxes on the wealthy, expand gun control legislation, and they both support President Obama’s executive orders on immigration.

Pence and Trump, while wildly different in campaign style, agree that immigrants who enter the country illegally should not be granted amnesty, that abortions should be restricted, and that cutting taxes is the way to a healthier economy.

The vice presidential nominees, Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, will meet on the debate stage Tuesday.

It'll be two traditional politicians facing off in a non-traditional election year: Kaine as the safe and even boring choice by Hillary Clinton and Pence as the calm, unflappable balance to Donald Trump's bombast.

When it comes to the issues, Kaine and Clinton mostly agree. Among other things, they want to raise taxes on the wealthy, expand gun control legislation, and they both support President Obama's executive orders on immigration.

The most popular time to tweet in the last couple days, if you're a presidential candidate, has been before the sun rises.

On Saturday, Hillary Clinton unleashed a pre-dawn tweetstorm in response to Donald Trump's now-infamous early-morning tweets the previous day.

Contrasting tweetstorms

In her 3 a.m. tweets, Clinton focused on policy — specifically on national service, which was the focus on a speech she gave Friday.

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