Jake Ryan

Jake Ryan is reporter and producer at KVNF. He received his B.A. in Journalism from Western Illinois University.  After serving with Americorps and volunteering for a community radio station in Maryland, he graduated from the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies.  His pieces have been aired on Delmarva Public Radio, Maine Public Broadcasting Network, and New Hampshire Public Radio.  He enjoys board games, trying new things, and flying kites. 

Kate Howard

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is wading into a precedent-setting legal battle to determine if the fees associated with expunging a criminal record can be waived for people who can’t afford them.

Frederick Jones, a 56-year old Louisville man, sought a waiver in 2018 for a then-$500 fee to clear a decades old felony theft charge from his record. A Jefferson Circuit court ruled he had to pay. And when the Kentucky Supreme Court takes up the case, Cameron will be advocating for that ruling to be upheld.

In doing so, the court would set a standard that anyone wanting a felony expungement must pay fees, currently set at $300. Criminal justice reform advocates and voting rights activists say that will impede access to expungement, a process needed for many people with criminal convictions who want to reclaim their right to vote, bear arms, participate in their kids’ school activities and get jobs.

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