Kentucky Supreme Court To Hear Coronavirus-Related Cases

Apr 18, 2021
Stephanie Wolf

Kentucky’s Supreme Court has agreed to take up the Democratic governor’s challenge of Republican-backed laws aimed at limiting his authority to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The GOP-led legislature passed the measures over Gov. Andy Beshear’s vetoes. The governor immediately filed a lawsuit. The new laws curbing his executive powers were temporarily blocked by Franklin County Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd.

The Supreme Court says it will extend its review to a second pandemic-related case at the same time. Chief Justice John D. Minton Jr. says the review will be expedited. The court will hear arguments June 10 in both cases.

The man who police say carried out a mass shooting that left eight people dead and several others injured at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis is said to have used two assault rifles in the attack, both of which were purchased legally.

Dan Meyers/Unsplash

A new support group in Henderson is aimed at helping people who have lost a loved one to suicide.

The group’s founder, Cindy Weaver, said it’s called Infinite Hope because people who take their own lives have lost hope. 

Weaver said she’s met many survivors who haven’t sought help for the trauma and grief that followed the death of their friend or family member. 

“We want to be able, through our support groups and walking alongside the survivors to know they don’t have to go through this alone, help to restore hope back into their lives again, so they can move into a life that feels purposeful and has meaning in it once again,” said Weaver.


Jess Clark | WFPL

School districts across Kentucky are trying to decide whether to offer students a chance to repeat the 2020-2021 academic year, to make up for what some parents believe was a period of lost learning due to the pandemic. 

new Kentucky law allows districts to let students in grades K-12 retake a full year of classes, possibly for a better grade. The measure also allows students, including some graduating seniors, to participate in an additional year of athletics. 

Lawmakers left it to individual school districts to decide whether or not to offer the “supplemental school year.” Families must submit their requests to participate by May 1, and districts must decide by June 1 whether to offer the program. Districts can’t pick and choose which requests to grant—if they decide to offer the supplemental school year, they must oblige all who request it.

Simon & Schuster has scrapped its plans to distribute a book written by one of the Louisville police officers who shot Breonna Taylor, after news of its publication ignited widespread criticism.

Sheldon's Express Pharmacy

One of the biggest challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic is getting vaccinations to people who are homebound.

A Bowling Green-based pharmacy is one of the health care providers that’s taken some of those life-saving “shots of hope” to the elderly and disabled who can’t get to vaccination clinics. 

As soon as Sheldon’s Express Pharmacy got the COVID-19 vaccine, the decision was made to offer vaccinations to homebound patients who were already getting medications delivered. 

Pharmacist Jack Downing said the owner of the pharmacy decided it was important to reach patients who are unable to get to a vaccination site

“This is just mainly a service to the community and to our patients,” Downing said. “That was the first thing that Steve Sheldon said, was we need to take care of the ones that we need to take care of, that are truly homebound, and offer it to them if they want it, and we’ll go to the house and do it.”


Brittany Patterson

In Central Appalachia an estimated 538,000 unplugged oil and gas wells and 853,393 acres of abandoned mine lands sit unreclaimed, often polluting the air and water, and presenting public safety threats.

But according to two new reports from the regional think tank Ohio River Valley Institute,  these sites that now pose serious health risks to residents could be providing thousands of jobs for the region. The group’s findings indicate that, should the federal government take the risk seriously and invest in mitigation, not only would environmental risk be reduced, but thousands of well-paying jobs could potentially be created.

Mary Meehan

A newly released poll suggests Kentucky has a good chance of reaching herd immunity with the COVID-19 vaccine. 

Herd immunity is achieved when a significant amount of the population is vaccinated or immune to infection. Experts believe herd immunity will be possible when that applies to 70-85% of the population. 

The poll found 71% of Kentucky adults have already received or intend to get the vaccine. The 29% of Kentuckians who said they hesitant to get the shot were more likely to be male, Republican, and live in suburban or rural communities.

Ben Chandler heads the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, which funded the survey. He says much of the hesitancy toward the vaccine can be attributed to misinformation.

Ryland Barton

Election reform efforts to expand ballot access made little headway around the Ohio Valley, as only one state in the region made voting easier, according to a voting rights expert. 

 

Several state governments around the nation are making major changes to voting laws following the 2020 presidential election.  

 

Kentucky is the only state in the Ohio Valley that passed significant voting changes. Lawmakers in the state passed a bipartisan election reform bill, House Bill 574, that made a few pandemic-era voting changes permanent, with some adjustments.

 

 


Henderson Community College

Henderson Community College is increasing support for students facing personal challenges that might have been intensified by the emotional and physical stress of the year-long COVID-19 pandemic.

The college has opened a new one-stop center offering support for issues that could prevent academic success. 

The HCC Care Center may be small in size, but it offers students connections to a big range of community services.

Career Services Coordinator Angie Watson said the HCC Care Center can help with a wide range of  issues.

“Substance disorders, domestic violence, housing issues, mental and physical issues that they may be facing," said Watson. "We’ve got some great mental health facilities that can assist them and offer crisis counseling.”


Pages

New Weekend Programs Airing on WKU Public Radio

WKU Public Radio

New Weekend Programs Now Airing on WKU Public Radio

WKU Public Radio has some changes coming to our weekend programming lineup, aimed at enhancing the quantity and quality of shows our listeners can expect to hear on Saturdays and Sundays! The decision by American Public Media to halt production of Live From Here has led to some new additions to our weekends, and some changes to when a few current shows air. Starting Saturday, Sept. 19, our regular Saturday lineup will include an hour of Lost River Sessions Radio, the radio companion to the WKYU PBS series Lost River Sessions ; and the music program Mountain Stage .

Read More

Coronavirus Update

Office of Governor Andy Beshear

WATCH: Gov. Beshear's Live News Briefings about COVID-19

The novel coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19, have had an enormous impact on daily life in Kentucky and the world, prompting governments at all levels to respond. Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear has been holding semi-regular news briefings about measures being taken in the state to combat the spread of COVID-19. Those briefings are being streamed live at Gov. Beshear's Facebook page and YouTube channel. You can access live webstreaming of the governor's daily news conferences by clicking on the links above.

Read More

Ask Us Your Questions About Coronavirus In The Ohio Valley

Hearken

Ask Us Your Questions About Coronavirus In The Ohio Valley

The Ohio Valley ReSource and its seven partner stations in Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia have mobilized to cover the coronavirus pandemic and the profound effects it is having on how we live in the region. This is an anxious, bewildering time, and we know you have a lot of questions. We want to help answer them. Ask your question below and the ReSource reporters will try their best to find an answer.

Read More

Become a Member Today

LRS Archive

Bryan Lemon

LRS Live Replay: Kyshona & Dax Evans

February's Lost River Sessions LIVE show at the Captiol Arts Center in Bowling Green was a special one. Fans saw local singer and songwriter Dax Evans take the stage, performing some heartfelt original songs. Meanwhile, Nashville artist, and former music therapist Kyshona, blessed the venue on the eve of her album release with new music.

Read More

Monday Afternoons at 4:45c/5:45e

Exploring the changing economy of Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia

Join our mailing list

We'll send you occasional updates about WKU Public Radio