no knock warrants

Stephanie Wolf

The city of Louisville will pay $12 million to the family of Breonna Taylor and adopt several policing reforms to settle the family’s wrongful death lawsuit, the city announced Tuesday afternoon.

The payment — the largest for police misconduct in city history — follows a months-long firestorm of protests, police reforms and demands for justice after the police shooting death of Taylor, a 26-year-old Black woman and emergency room tech, who Louisville Metro Police officers shot and killed in March during an early morning raid at her apartment.

“Justice for Breonna is multilayered. What we were able to accomplish today through the civil settlement against the officers was tremendous, but it’s only a portion of a single layer,” said Taylor family attorney Lonita Baker. “It’s important to note here that a financial settlement was non-negotiable without significant police reform.”

Sydney Boles | Ohio Valley ReSource

Kentucky’s senior U.S. Senator, Republican Mitch McConnell, said it’s not his job to weigh in on whether no-knock warrants should be banned statewide.

McConnell spoke in Lexington Tuesday, when the Kentucky Fraternal Order of the Police endorsed his re-election campaign. He addressed a bill, pre-filed by Democratic Rep. Attica Scott last month. It’s been called “Breonna’s Law for Kentucky” — Breonna Taylor was shot and killed in March by Louisville Metro Police officers carrying out a warrant with a provision that allowed them to enter her home without knocking.

“This whole debate over no knock warrants is a matter of law,” McConnell said Tuesday. “You either allow them or you don’t… whether it will be taken up at the state level, I don’t know. But that’s not an issue, I think, at the federal level.”

J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky’s statewide police union is speaking out against a proposal to ban no-knock search warrants and penalize officers who don’t activate body cameras while executing search warrants.

Louisville Democratic Rep. Attica Scott proposed the measure, which she named “Breonna’s Law” for Breonna Taylor, who was shot and killed by Louisville police executing a no-knock search warrant in March.

In a Facebook post on Sunday, the Kentucky Fraternal Order of Police said that the bill was “based on an incomplete investigation and no facts” and that it didn’t provide due process for officers.

Kentucky LRC

Kentucky Senate President Robert Stivers says he is working on a bill that would ban most no-knock warrants in the state—the process that Louisville police used to raid Breonna Taylor’s apartment in March.

Police shot and killed Taylor during the raid, prompting massive protests in Louisville and across the country.

Stivers, a Republican from Manchester, said that legislation would include exceptions, allowing no-knock warrants to be issued in hostage situations. But he said that the bill would ban the warrants from being used in cases like Taylor’s.