Kentucky Wesleyan College

Kentucky Wesleyan College

The president of Kentucky Wesleyan College  has resigned and a long-time Western Kentucky University administrator will temporarily fill the position.

Bart Darrell has served as president of Kentucky Wesleyan College in Owensboro for five years and will step down from that position on June 1. His contract was set to run to 2021.

A statement on the school’s website quoted board chairman, Judge Phillip Shepherd, as saying Darrell was ready to "...embark on new changes in his life and career.”

Darrell's statement about his resignation is on a video at the KWC website.

The statement on the KWC website also credits Darrell with reversing enrollment declines, with growth in Kentucky Wesleyen’s first-year student class size and retention. 

Becca Schimmel

Students at Kentucky Wesleyan College are going to get some free rides. The school is partnering with Owensboro Transit System.

The agreement for weekend transportation begins Friday, April 12 with the trolley stopping at the Kentucky Wesleyan campus. Students will be able to use their college ID for the trolley ride of about two miles into downtown Owensboro.

Kentucky Wesleyan College Interim Vice President of Advancement Eddie Kenny said there’s a mutual benefit in building a long-term relationship with the Owensboro Transit System.

Kentucky Wesleyan College

Republicans held onto their majorities in the Kentucky legislature in the Nov. 6 midterm election, while the Democrats’ efforts for a 'blue wave' didn’t materialize.

A political science professor in Daviess County says it’s pretty clear how the upcoming legislative session is going to unfold.

On a state level, the midterm election was notable for Kentucky because Republicans held their majority in the state House of Representatives and retained their supermajority in the Senate.

“While this was largely expected, it’s still frustrating for the Democrats who tried to mobilize support against the pension reform sponsored by the Republicans,” said Eric Schmidt, assistant professor of political science at Kentucky Wesleyan College in Owensboro.

Dr. Kim Cecil

An Owensboro native who does research on how chemicals in the home and air affect the brain says we can make informed choices to minimize exposure.

Researcher Kim Cecil will discuss how she discovered her career path and her work at her alma mater, Kentucky Wesleyan College, on Wednesday, Oct. 3 at 7:30 p.m. in Rogers Hall at the  Winchester Center.

Cecil’s presentation titled, “Finding Significance: How We Make A Difference in the World,” at Kentucky Wesleyan is the annual Ellie Magnuson Lecture in Literature and Science. The event is open to the publc.

Kentucky Wesleyan College

Kentucky Wesleyan College received a $3 million gift from an Owensboro dentist who was not a graduate of the school.

Dr. Willard Gillespie died in July at age 92 and designated the money to the college in his will. Kentucky Wesleyan College President Bart Darrell said the dentist often spoke of his support for the school’s mission.

“We really do combine, and this is something that Dr. Gillespie really believed in, we really do combine the practical career end game type education, but at the same time, everything we do is guided by what we call the Wesleyan Way, four principles of honor, support for each other, competition with integrity and then love for each other,” said Darrell.

Darrell said the dentist appreciated the school’s dedication to providing career training and the importance the college places on character building, integrity and community.

Flickr/Creative Commons/tableatny

Three Owensboro-based institutions are combining efforts to build a new state-of-the-art track and field facility.

Kentucky Wesleyan College, Owensboro Public Schools, and Owensboro Health announced Tuesday  that they will collaborate on the new facility, which will be located between the north and south campuses of Owensboro Middle School.

The project will feature a high-quality synthetic track surface, a steeplechase pit, a runway for long and triple jumps, a javelin area, a pole vault runway, and a shot put and discus/hammer throw event pad.

“We will be able to host collegiate track and field meets that Owensboro and Daviess County have not been able to do before, and it also creates an opportunity for the region, generally, from an economic impact and activities standpoint, to host large AAU meets,” said Kentucky Wesleyan College President Bart Darrell.

The Owensboro Health Track & Field Complex will be located between the Owensboro Middle School North and South campuses on South Griffin Avenue. Both Kentucky Wesleyan and Owensboro High School will use the new facility to host meets.

The facility will cost an estimated one million dollars, and will also be used to promote wellness activities for the general public. No timetable for the facility’s completion has been set.

Kentucky Wesleyan College in Owensboro has appointed its 34th president.

The school announced Thursday Barton D. Darrell will be officially introduced as its next leader at a news conference on Tuesday.

Darrell has been a vice-president at the school for 11 months. He has extensive ties to the Bowling Green area, serving as a partner with the law firm of Bell, Orr, Ayers, and Moore beginning in 1991. Darrel served as general counsel for the Warren County Public School system, and is a former president of the Bowling Green-Warren County Bar Association.

His father, Bob Darrell, is a professor emeritus of English at Kentucky Wesleyan College.

The news conference to introduce Barton Darrell as the school’s new president is Sept. 9, at noon in Rogers Hall at the Winchester Center. The public is invited to attend.

Kentucky Wesleyan College

After three years as president of Kentucky Wesleyan College in Owensboro, Dr. Craig Turner says he’ll retire in September.  Turner will turn 68 years old in January and says he plans to move back to Dallas with his wife Annette to be closer to family.

Turner became president at Kentucky Wesleyan in 2011 after serving as president at colleges in Salisbury, North Carolina and Abilene, Texas.

The chair of Kentucky Wesleyan’s board of trustees, Tom Grieb, says the process of selecting Turner’s replacement is underway.

Bowling Green attorney Bart Darrell will become Vice President of External Services at Kentucky Wesleyan College in Owensboro.

“We are pleased to welcome Bart to campus in this new role. He knows the College well and loves Kentucky Wesleyan and Owensboro,” stated KWC President Dr. Craig Turner. “We welcome his experiences, insights, energy and leadership acumen.”

A news release on the college's website says Darrell will administer development, admissions, financial aid, alumni relations and public relations functions.

Darrell has worked for the law firm of Bell, Orr, Ayers & Moore in Bowling Green since 1987 and spent the past 13 years as general counsel for Warren County Public Schools.

“I first met Bart twelve years ago at Richardsville Elementary School. It has been very obvious to me since that time that he is a man with a true heart and passion for education," said Warren County School Board Chairman Kerry Young in a news release.

Kentucky Wesleyan to Offer Graduation Guarantees

May 13, 2013

Owensboro's Kentucky Wesleyan College says it will begin offering four-year graduation guarantees to incoming freshmen this fall. The school also plans to offer a three-year degree option.

KWC director of admissions Rashad Smith told the Messenger-Inquirer that the college will pay for up to one year of additional coursework for students who don't graduate within four years. He said the program is being launched to foster lasting, helpful relationships with students in the beginning of their college experience.

No life-threatening injuries are reported following a bus crash in Tennessee involving students from an Owensboro college. Members of the Kentucky Wesleyan Singers and Chamber Singers were aboard the charter bus that went over a small hill beside a road in Signal Mountain, Tennessee, late Sunday night.

A Chattanooga TV station reports 22 people were taken to hospitals.

A Kentucky Wesleyan College spokeswoman told WKU Public Radio the rest of the group’s week-long tour has been cancelled following the accident. The singers began their tour with stops in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, Nashville and Signal Mountain, Tennessee. They were on their way to sing in Atlanta when the bus accident occurred.