Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Turkish forces began crossing the Syrian border on Wednesday, launching an operation in Kurdish-dominated areas of the country's north, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced.

The Turkish offensive jeopardizes Kurdish-led forces who have been a key U.S. ally in the bloody fight against ISIS. Turkey says those same forces are linked to militant groups who stage attacks in a separatist movement against the Turkish government.

The Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded jointly to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino for the development of lithium-ion batteries.

"Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized our lives and are used in everything from mobile phones to laptops and electric vehicles," the Nobel Committee said. "Through their work, this year's Chemistry Laureates have laid the foundation of a wireless, fossil fuel-free society."

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Kurdish allies of the U.S. say President Trump's decision to pull troops from the Syria-Turkey border is "shocking" and deflating — and they warn that the U.S. is duplicating a mistake it made in Iraq, where it has ceded partial control to Iran.

Within hours of the announcement from the White House late Sunday, local Kurdish forces on the ground confirmed to NPR that U.S. soldiers began leaving bases in Tel Abyad and Ras al Ayn, in Syria near the Syria-Turkey border.

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET

Faced with an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease that has sickened 124 people and caused one death, North Carolina health officials say they've traced the source to a fair that was held last month. In particular, they say, people were more likely to develop the pneumonia-type disease if they walked past a hot tub display at the North Carolina Mountain State Fair.

Large protests have triggered a state of emergency in Ecuador, after President Lenín Moreno moved ahead with his plan to end fuel subsidies. Moreno says he's ending the "perverse" gasoline subsidy after 40 years because it was distorting Ecuador's economy.

Updated at 7:16 p.m. ET

Brandt Jean's extraordinary response to a convicted murderer — he hugged Amber Guyger as she was sentenced for killing his brother, Botham Jean — has provoked an array of reactions, from admiration to frustration. It has also deepened a national debate over regulating police use of force.

Hong Kong's government is expected to take the rare step of invoking emergency powers on Friday so that it can enact a ban on face masks like the ones pro-democracy protesters have worn during months of demonstrations.

Media reports of the possible action emerged days after police shot a pro-democracy protester in the chest during an altercation, signaling a new escalation by authorities and bringing protesters' rage to new heights.

Updated at 3:22 p.m. ET

The World Trade Organization says the U.S. can move forward with plans to impose some $7.5 billion in tariffs on EU goods annually, to counteract years of European loans and illegal subsidies to Airbus.

The decision comes after a years-long dispute over European Union countries' roles in building Airbus into a global player — and a fierce competitor to U.S. aerospace giant Boeing.

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has banned Alberto Salazar, the famed track coach and former marathon champion, for four years. USADA says Salazar trafficked testosterone, infused a prohibited amount of L-carnitine and tried to tamper with doping controls.

Salazar is the head coach for long-distance running at the Nike Oregon Project, an elite program where he has worked with track stars such as Mo Farah. The ban comes after an independent panel of the American Arbitration Association decided to punish Salazar and his colleague Dr. Jeffrey Brown, a former consultant with Nike.

The NFL is suspending Oakland Raiders linebacker Vontaze Burfict without pay for the rest of the 2019 season, after Burfict lowered his head to make helmet-to-helmet contact during a tackle this weekend.

"The discipline marks the longest punishment ever handed down for an on-field act in NFL history," NFL.com says in regard to Burfict, who has repeatedly violated the league's unnecessary roughness rules.

Montana is under emergency conditions after an intense winter storm dumped record amounts of snow along with a life-threatening combination of bitter cold and stiff winds. In the town of Browning, 48 inches of snow fell from Friday to Sunday, the National Weather Service says.

Despite coming in late September, the 19.3 inches of snow that just fell over two days in Great Falls is second to only one other two-day total in the city — in any month. The only time the city recorded more snow in two days was during a winter storm more than 10 years ago.

The gap between the richest and the poorest U.S. households is now the largest it's been in the past 50 years — despite the median U.S. income hitting a new record in 2018, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Updated at 4:02 p.m. ET

Federal prosecutors are charging 11 doctors with unlawfully distributing opioids and other substances, in the second large operation to target "pill mill" operators and health care fraud this year. Two other people also face charges in the sting.

"The alleged conduct resulted in the distribution of more than 17 million pills" in the Appalachian region, the Justice Department said.

Iran is facing off with rival Saudi Arabia in Yemen, trading barbs with President Trump and threatening the movement of oil. But none of those things prevented Iranian President Hassan Rouhani from unveiling something a bit unexpected at the U.N. General Assembly on Wednesday: a regional peace proposal.

"Ladies and gentlemen, the Middle East is burning in the flames of war, bloodshed, aggression, occupation and religious and sectarian fanaticism and extremism," Rouhani said.

Google and other search engines must agree to European citizens' requests for some information about them to be "forgotten" online — but that process shouldn't be global, and it applies only to search sites in the EU, the European Court of Justice says.

The ruling is a win for Google, as it puts new restrictions on a 2014 European Union court decision that affirmed individuals' rights to ask tech companies to remove URLs from search results related to their name.

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