Donald Trump

Michelle Hanks

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell defended President Trump on Tuesday, days after the president tweeted that a group of Democratic congresswomen should “go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came.”

McConnell declined to directly address Trump’s statement, instead saying that political rhetoric has gotten “way overheated all across the political spectrum,” focusing on statements made by Democrats.

 


Updated at 9:20 p.m. ET

Congress has delayed testimony by former special counsel Robert Mueller one week to permit lawmakers to get more time to question him, committee leaders said on Friday.

Mueller had been scheduled to appear on the morning of July 17 before the House Judiciary Committee and then that afternoon before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

That was put on hold after grumbling by some members of Congress over the rules of procedure for the sessions.

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

President Trump announced Thursday he would sign an executive order to obtain data about the U.S. citizenship and noncitizenship status of everyone living in the United States.

In a Rose Garden ceremony, Trump said he would drop efforts to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census. Instead, his executive order will direct all U.S. agencies to provide the Department of Commerce all information they have on U.S. citizenship, noncitizenship and immigration status.

Even from the beginning, Mitch McConnell and Donald Trump had a complicated relationship.

In 1989, McConnell was running for reelection to the Senate. As he once told a Senate committee, the reason he and other lawmakers spent much of their time fundraising was because "we like to win."

Ryland Barton

A federal appeals court in New Orleans heard oral arguments Tuesday on the legality of the Affordable Care Act. The Trump administration and Republican-led states say the entire law — which goes way beyond the controversial individual mandate to buy insurance — is unconstitutional.

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear is part of a group of Democratic state officials that argue the law is legal and should stay as-is. He spoke during a press conference following the oral arguments Tuesday.

J. Tyler Franklin

U.S. Senator Rand Paul said he wants to see lower prices and more transparency in the health care industry, but he doesn’t support the methods being used by President Trump.

Trump recently signed an executive order to increase pricing transparency for patients before they receive healthcare services. The order aims to bring prices down by letting people shop around. 

 

Paul, a Republican from Bowling Green, said that’s not exactly how the health care market works. 


Lisa Gillespie

The Trump administration is proposing a change to what income level is considered “poverty,” which could result in thousands of Kentuckians losing food stamps, health insurance and other programs that serve people with low incomes.

Currently the poverty threshold is $12,490 for one person — it’s a calculation that generally increases every year as the government adjusts for inflation. That inflation is based on the consumer price index, which includes the cost of food a typical person or family needs to maintain a healthy diet. Right now, as the consumer price index increases, so does the poverty threshold.

Sydney Boles

A large whiteboard in an Ashland, Kentucky, unemployment office is covered with a list of companies that are currently hiring. Senior career counselor Melissa Sloas said that just a few years ago, that board was a lot emptier.

This corner of eastern Kentucky has long struggled to make up for losses in mining and manufacturing. Unemployment in the Ashland area is still around 6.3 percent, well above the state average. Career center employees said workers are anxious about the closure of longtime employer AK Steel, which announced in January it would close its Ashland plant this year.


Nicole Erwin I Ohio Valley ReSource

Ohio Valley farmers say the latest tariff escalation between the Trump administration and China could continue to hurt their businesses, with many farmers already facing financial struggles.  

As Chinese officials visit Washington, D.C., for more trade talks, the Trump administration announced this week increased tariffs, planned to go into effect Friday, on $200 billion dollars worth of Chinese goods, accusing the country of reneging on trade promises.


Becca Schimmel

Bowling Green is one of the places where activists gathered Thursday night to demand the immediate release of the unredacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

The rally was part of what activists called a “National Day of Action” intended to put pressure on U.S. Attorney General William Barr. About 12 people showed up outside the William H. Natcher federal building in downtown Bowling Green for what was billed as a “Trump Is Not Above the Law” rally.

Becca Schimmel

Congressman Brett Guthrie is joining the chorus of Republicans who say President Trump has been vindicated by Robert Mueller’s report.

The Bowling Green Republican described the effort as a waste of resources. Over the weekend, the special counsel’s office completed its investigation and submitted a report to U.S. Attorney General William Barr’s office. Barr sent a summary of Mueller’s report to Congress, saying the AG’s office interpreted the report as saying there was no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, and insufficient evidence of any obstruction of justice by the Trump administration.

Gage Skidmore/Creative Commons

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul on Monday called the probe into Russia’s meddling in the 2016 presidential election a “colossal waste of money and time,” saying that the summary of the investigation released over the weekend vindicated President Donald Trump.

The investigation, summarized by U.S. Attorney General William Barr in a four-page letter on Sunday, concluded that Trump’s campaign did not conspire with Russia to interfere in the election but left unresolved whether the president tried to obstruct justice.

Updated at 6:56 p.m. ET

Special counsel Robert Mueller did not find evidence that President Trump's campaign conspired with Russia to influence the 2016 election, according to a summary of findings submitted to Congress by Attorney General William Barr.

"The Special Counsel's investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election," Barr wrote in a letter to leaders of the House and Senate judiciary committees on Sunday afternoon.

Updated at 7:46 p.m. ET

Attorney General William Barr received a report on Friday by special counsel Robert Mueller about the findings from Mueller's investigation into the Russian attack on the 2016 presidential election.

Amid signs that special counsel Robert Mueller will soon complete his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, President Trump says that he looks forward to seeing the report and that it should be made public.

Answering questions from reporters on the South Lawn of the White House prior to traveling to Ohio on Wednesday, Trump said of Mueller's report, "Let it come out. Let people see it — that's up to the attorney general."

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