2019 election

Cameron for Kentucky

A Louisville man has filed a lawsuit to remove Republican candidate for attorney general Daniel Cameron from the ballot in November.

The lawsuit filed in Jefferson County Circuit Court alleges that Cameron has not been a practicing attorney for long enough to become attorney general. State law requires candidates to have practiced law for at least eight years.

The Kentucky Bar Association admitted Cameron on Oct 21, 2011 — a little more than eight years before Election Day on Nov. 5.

Creative Commons

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes clashed with the State Board of Elections on Tuesday after revelations that the board had placed more than 165,000 people on an “inactive list” in the state’s voter registration system.

Representatives from the State Board of Elections say people on the “inactive list” will be removed from the voter rolls if they don’t update their registrations or vote in the next two federal elections.

But they will still be able to vote during the upcoming November elections when Kentuckians will weigh in on races for governor, attorney general and other statewide offices.

Kentucky Lawmaker Resigns, Citing Belief in Term Limits

Sep 10, 2019
LRC Public Information

A Kentucky lawmaker who serves as a committee chairman has resigned, citing his belief in term limits.

Republican state Rep. Tim Moore submitted his resignation in a letter to Gov. Matt Bevin. The letter says his resignation took effect Tuesday.

Moore represented a House district covering Grayson County and part of Hardin County.

Moore's letter says he's long believed in term limits as a "worthy ideal of government service." Moore writes that it's time to "apply that principle to myself."

Ryland Barton

The president’s son, Donald Trump Jr., headlined a sparsely-attended campaign rally for Gov. Matt Bevin in Pikeville on Thursday. It was the latest in a string of events attended by President Trump and his surrogates supporting Bevin’s reelection bid.

Bevin is facing a tough race against Democratic rival Andy Beshear and is trying to rally support in eastern Kentucky, which used to be a Democratic stronghold but has trended Republican in recent years.

J. Tyler Franklin

Matt Bevin is talking about abortion non-stop in his re-election campaign. That’s a logical strategy in a state like Kentucky. But I’m skeptical that this approach will help him that much.

Let me start with why this approach is smart for Bevin. Kentucky has a lot of people who are anti-abortion. About 20 percent of Kentucky adults believe that abortion should be “illegal in all cases,” a number bigger than in all but five states, according to polling data released last week by the Public Religion Research Institute. (Only Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Nebraska, and Arkansas have a higher percentage of people opposed to all abortions. Twenty-three percent of people in Louisiana think abortion should be illegal in all cases, the highest of any state.)

J. Tyler Franklin

During a speech in Louisville Wednesday, President Donald Trump announced that he will sign an order forgiving federal student loan debt for permanently and totally disabled veterans.

“Today I’m proud to announce that I’m taking executive action to ensure our wounded warriors are not saddled with mountains of student debt,” Trump said. “In a few moments, I will sign a memorandum directing the Department of Education to eliminate every penny of federal student loan debt owed by American veterans who are completely and permanently disabled.”

J. Tyler Franklin

First, on August 1, Gov. Matt Bevin held a press conference to attack Andy Beshear for attending a fundraiser co-hosted by Ernest Marshall, a doctor and co-founder of the EMW Women’s Surgical Center, the only clinic in Kentucky that provides abortions. He accused Beshear of “accepting blood money” and suggested Democrats are “using money from killing Kentuckians to fund Andy Beshear.”

Two days days later, in a speech at Fancy Farm, Bevin’s running mate, Ralph Alvarado, referred to the attorney general as “Abortion Andy.” Last week, Bevin released a Facebook video attacking Beshear in which he used the word abortion seven times in less than three minutes. A day later, Bevin held an event to highlight four anti-abortion bills that Kentucky’s legislature adopted and the governor signed into law earlier this year.

Trump to Headline Fundraiser for Gov. Matt Bevin

Aug 12, 2019
J. Tyler Franklin

President Donald Trump will headline a fundraiser next week for Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin, who is banking on his close ties with the Republican president as he faces a tough challenge from a Democratic rival in a state that Trump dominated in 2016.

Trump will travel to Kentucky to attend the Aug. 21 fundraiser in Louisville, Bevin's campaign announced Monday.

"Gov. Bevin is thankful for President Trump's friendship and strong support," Bevin campaign manager Davis Paine said in a release.

J. Tyler Franklin

Kentuckians dislike their governor and one of their senators more than the residents of any of the other 49 states. Yet, Kentuckians could re-elect Matt Bevin as governor this November.

The non-partisan D.C.-based Cook Political Report ranks Bevin’s race against Democrat Andy Behear as a toss-up right now. The state is, according to Cook, also “likely” to send Mitch McConnell back to the Senate for a seventh term next fall, even though Democrat and former Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath raised more than $2.5 million last month in her first day as candidate.

Ryland Barton

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin held a press conference Thursday denouncing Attorney General Andy Beshear for receiving campaign donations from two local abortion providers.

Beshear is a Democrat and challenging Bevin in Kentucky’s race for governor this year.

Bevin accused Beshear of being “in collusion” with the state’s only abortion provider and not adequately defending a handful of abortion laws that have passed out of the legislature in recent years.

 


Republican Lawmaker Endorses Democratic Nominee for Governor

Jul 29, 2019
J. Tyler Franklin

Democratic gubernatorial nominee Andy Beshear won an endorsement Monday from a longtime Republican state lawmaker who criticized GOP Gov. Matt Bevin for "running around the state insulting" people — including teachers in his own family.

Sen. Dan Seum, a former member of the Senate GOP leadership team, announced his support for Beshear at the start of a crucial week in Kentucky's hard-fought governor's race. Bevin and Beshear will square off Saturday at the Fancy Farm picnic — the state's biggest political event.

J. Tyler Franklin

Attorney General Andy Beshear says that any legislation passed during Gov. Matt Bevin’s special session on pensions is at risk of a legal challenge.

Beshear says that Bevin’s official proclamation that called the special session was too narrowly drawn, preventing lawmakers from considering alternate proposals.

During a news conference on Saturday, Beshear called on Bevin to amend his call for the special session.

 

Beshear Outlines Policies For Veteran Health Care

Jul 18, 2019
Ryland Barton

Attorney General Andy Beshear is appealing to Kentucky veterans with a set of health-related programs and policies he’d work toward if elected governor in November.

“We have a special duty to our veterans whose health care needs so often come from the sacrifice that they have made for our country,” Beshear said, adding that he wants to address some of the biggest challenges of vets.

“Our health care plan is designed to make sure that we can provide the services we need to stop those suicides, to stop that substance abuse. And to truly be there for our veterans.”

J. Tyler Frankin

Gov. Matt Bevin is again the most unpopular governor in America and is getting less popular according to a new poll.

Bevin was first elected in 2015 and is seeking reelection this year, trying to become the first Republican governor in state history to serve two terms.

 


Ryland Barton

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear clashed over education, health care and pensions at a forum hosted by the Kentucky Farm Bureau on Wednesday.

The rivals in Kentucky’s race for governor touted their rural roots and played up stark differences in their personalities and policy proposals.

 

Beshear attacked Bevin for supporting charter schools, saying that the institutions would run traditional public schools “out of town.”

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