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Indiana Tech

Indiana Tech is expanding its presence in Kentucky by opening a campus in Bowling Green. 

The school has a traditional campus in Fort Wayne, along with 18 other locations that primarily serve working adults. 

“The difference between us and other schools, is that even if they’re online students, we like to have people face to face to offer various types of support from admissions to tutoring to helping them with registration," said VP for Enrollment Management Steve Herendeen.

WKU

Western Kentucky University wants to expand the number—and demographic—of students who take part in its Study Abroad program.

The school is trying to convince more students who are from low-income families or minority groups to study overseas.

Natasha Breu, a journalism major from Clarksville, Tennessee, is an example of the kind of student WKU wants to be a part of Study Abroad.


Becca Schimmel

The tragic images coming out of the Bahamas following Hurricane Dorian are hitting home for three Western Kentucky University students from the Caribbean nation. 

One of them is freshman Khajzan Taylor, who said it’s hard to watch his community suffer, while he’s safely in the U.S.

“It does something to me because I’m so far away, and I hate to see my people in agony like that.”


Becca Schimmel

Western Kentucky University is hosting a support group this semester for LGBTQIA+ students.

LGBTQIA stands for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, and Allies. The plus sign at the end of the phrase is meant to include anyone who doesn't feel covered by the other terms. 

Katie Knackmuhs, a WKU counselor who is helping lead the group, said the goal is to create a supportive environment for students to develop a deeper community and maximize their collegiate experience.

She said some LGBTQIA+ students who arrive on campus are struggling with a lack of acceptance back home.

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As a new academic year begins, Western Kentucky University President Timothy Caboni says the school will continue to build on improvements made toward retaining and graduating more students. 

In his opening convocation to faculty and staff on Monday, Dr. Caboni said the first-to-second-semester persistence rate for students who began last fall was up four percent compared to 2017.  Bigger gains were made among low-income, minority, and first-generation students. 

Somerset Community College

Western Kentucky University and Somerset Community College formally signed an agreement Thursday that will lead to expanded degree offerings in Pulaski County.

The partnership will allow WKU to offer bachelor’s degrees through SCC, a two-year college. The aim is to increase access for Pulaski County-area students with work or family obligations who need to remain in the region.

SCC President Carey Castle said increasing local college degree holders will have a wide-ranging impact.

“I was in a meeting this morning with Somerset-Pulaski Economic Development Authority, and those industry individuals are just looking forward to this opportunity to get university graduates in the area.”

Lisa Autry

As Western Kentucky University focuses on retaining and graduating more students, a housing project is getting underway to help the school achieve those goals. 

Demolition begins this week on Bemis Lawrence Hall to make way for the new first-year village that's designed to enhance the college experience for freshmen by connecting students with similar interests. 

The first-year village will feature pod-style housing, social areas, study rooms, and faculty and student mentors.

WKU

Western Kentucky University is asking its academic colleges to manage another round of budget reductions during the upcoming fiscal year.

The school’s Board of Regents voted unanimously Friday in favor of a new budget totaling $387,762,000, a 0.2% decrease from the current fiscal year budget.

The spending plan contains $8.6 million in reductions for the school's budget units. WKU’s five academic colleges will have to identify $3.4 million in cuts over the course of the fiscal year.

President Timothy Caboni said he didn’t want to ask academic leaders to make quick decisions on what to cut by July 1. So, he said, colleges will be able to plan reductions throughout the course of fiscal year.

Nina Subin

The landmark legislation granting women in the U.S. the right to vote turns 100 years old this summer. 

To kick off a year-long celebration of the 19th Amendment, Western Kentucky University is hosting writer Elaine Weiss to campus.  Weiss, the author of The Woman's Hour, the Great Fight to Win the Vote, says the effort to force the vote in 1920 remains more than just a voting rights issue.

"It was about changing and challenging the role of women in society," Weiss told WKU Public Radio. "So it was cultural, it was societal, it was for some a moral debate about how women should be treated, were they more than just mothers and wives?"

angiethomas.com

More than 150 authors will be in Bowling Green Friday and Saturday for the 2019 Southern Kentucky Book Festival. 

Festival Coordinator Sara Volpi says the annual event is a great way to introduce the Bowling Green area to authors and visitors.

"The authors enjoy coming in and meeting new fans, and seeing old fans too. There's a lot of authors to discover and a lot of unique talent that comes into Bowling Green, and for some of these people it's their first trip to Bowling Green."


WKU

Western Kentucky University is closing a program on campus that promotes Chinese language and culture. 

In an email to faculty and staff on Monday, WKU President Timothy Caboni announced the school is terminating its agreement with the Confucius Institute. 

The institute came to WKU in 2010 and helps place Chinese language teachers in local K-through-12 schools, while also serving as a hub for teacher training and curriculum development.

“Though activities will phase out over the next several weeks, we will continue our dialogue with key partners to work toward a solution that allows WKU to continue our programming,” Dr. Caboni said. “We hope to strengthen, deepen and broaden our relationships with partner institutions in China throughout this process.”

WKU

Recommendations for the future of Western Kentucky University’s 380 academic programs are one step closer to becoming a reality.

The Academic Affairs Committee of the Board of Regents voted Friday in favor of accepting recommendations from the school’s Comprehensive Academic Program Evaluation (CAPE) committee.

Two members of the Regents’ Academic Affairs Committee, Chairman Jason McKinney and David Brinkley, voted in favor of the CAPE recommendations, with WKU Faculty Regent Claus Ernst abstaining.

The fourth member of the committee, Student Regent Stephen Mayer, wasn’t present.

WKU

The faculty regent at Western Kentucky University says he expects a proposal to suspend some academic programs will pass an initial vote on Friday. 

A committee made up of faculty members has recommended the school eliminate 101 programs, although many have no students currently enrolled. 

In an interview with WKU Public Radio, Dr. Claus Ernst said faculty he’s spoken to are largely in support of the recommendations.

“I think there’s a feeling that it could have been worse, but I wouldn’t go so far as to say faculty is happy. We’re all anxious about what the future will bring. Some programs will be cut even though they have some students in them, may not be a lot of students, but for any faculty member whose program is cut, that’s devastating.”

WKU

Western Kentucky University is making another leadership change in the Potter College of Arts and Letters. 

In an email on Wednesday afternoon to faculty and staff, Acting Provost Cheryl Stevens announced that Dr. Larry Snyder will resume serving as dean effective April 15.  He will finish his term which ends June 30, 2021.

Dr. Merrall Price, who was serving as interim dean, will remain as Special Assistant to the Provost until she begins her role as Associate Dean in Potter College effective July 1. 

WKU

The Western Kentucky University community is digesting the release of a set of recommendations impacting the school’s 380 academic programs.

WKU began the in-house review of programs last fall after years of state budget cuts and recent enrollment declines.

The decision to grow, maintain, or suspend certain programs is a part of WKU’s Comprehensive Academic Program Evaluation, or CAPE. The process examined the future viability of WKU’s academic programs, including majors, minors, and certificates.

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