Warren County

Fruit of the Loom Losing About 100 Jobs, Most in Kentucky

May 23, 2019

Fruit of the Loom says it is cutting about 100 jobs, mostly at its headquarters in Kentucky.

News outlets report the Bowling Green-based company said it is transferring information technology services to Wipro Ltd., an India-based company that specializes in IT, consulting and business process services.

The company said in a news release Wednesday that the transition starts immediately and continues through March. The move will result in the loss of about 100 positions, most of which are in Bowling Green.

A three day celebration of the life of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. kicks off Wednesday in Bowling Green with an event at Mt. Zion Baptist Church. A youth night on Sunday and series of gatherings on Monday will follow.

Bowling Green Martin Luther King Planning Committee chairperson Ryan Dearbone said the committee decided to expand from a one-day breakfast, march, and service in order to attract a wider audience. 

"Unless you just have the time, you're probably not going to get to come to all the events to hopefully you find an event within that week that you want to come to and that you're able to take part in," Dearbone said.

Rhonda J. Miller

More than 33,000 Kentucky students and their families will now have access to assistance for concerns ranging from school supplies to mental health counseling. State and local leaders were at Moss Middle School in Warren County on Jan. 14 to announce the opening of 28 new Family Resource Centers across the state.

Melissa Goins is the director for the Division of Family Resource and Youth Service Centers. That’s part of the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services.  Goins said the $8 milion grant is a breakthrough in funding.

“Our Family Resource Youth Service Centers are funded all from state dollars so this is the first year in a long time, in about 10 years that we’ve been able to expand our centers,” said Goins. “We haven’t opened any new ones in about 10 years, so this is really big deal.”


http://www.warrencountyky.gov

A declining number of suicides and overdose deaths are two factors behind the overall drop in deaths seen in Warren County last year. The county saw 78 fewer deaths in 2018 than the year before.

Suicides were down by four, fatal auto accidents by eight, homicides by three and overdose deaths declined by five. 

Warren County Coroner Kevin Kirby attributes the reduction in suicides to public awareness campaigns. He said the public has become more informed about noticing the warning signs for suicide, as well as the need to use seat belts while driving. Kirby said part of his job as coroner is to notice trends and work to prevent similar deaths from happening.

Warren County Sheriff's Office

The Warren County Sheriff’s Office held a memorial ceremony on July 12 to honor a member of its team that died under suspicious circumstances. The law enforcement agency is continuing the investigation into the death of K-9 Kane.

The only K-9 with the sheriff’s office was found unresponsive in his outdoor kennel at the home of his handler, Deputy Aaron Poynter, in late April. Kane was rushed to the vet, but couldn’t be saved.

"A necropsy was done immediately and evidence was sent to numerous labs for testing," said Sgt. Curtis Hargett, a spokesman for the sheriff’s office. "As time went on, we have determined now that the cause of death was foul play.”

Becca Schimmel

A southern Kentucky judge said the cost of incarceration is changing the way Kentucky deals with drug offenders.

Warren Circuit Court Judge Steve Wilson said he’s seen a shift in how Kentucky’s legislators view incarceration for drug crimes. He said legislators are increasingly talking to him and other judges about alternatives to jail. He said the cost of keeping people behind bars has a lot to do with that shifting mindset.

Kentucky Association of Food Banks

A new study on food insecurity found that 700,000 people in Kentucky - that’s one-in-six - are not sure where their next meal is coming from. The study by Feeding America called ‘Map the Meal Gap 2017’ shows that many Kentucky counties have a rate of food insecurity higher than the national average of 14 percent.

Barren, Hardin and Ohio counties are at 15 percent. Warren County is at 16 percent.

Tamara Sandberg is executive director of the Kentucky Association of Food Banks. She says Feeding America saw the need in Warren County long before this latest study, and last July began distributing truckloads of food once a month at Lampkin Park. 

Rhonda Miller

As wedding season shifts into high gear, some Kentucky farms are on the list of venues where couples can take their vows.  It’s one way farmers across the nation have been diversifying in recent years to bring in revenue. 

At one family farm in Kentucky, on any given day, the activity can run from corporate events to planning a wedding to taking care of the cows.                

The black Angus cows are grazing across the gently rolling hillsides at Charlie Mosley’s 160-acre farm in Warren County.

“Cows and calves and everything, there’s about 60 mamas here, and the rest of them are babies and bulls. They’re beef cattle, yeah, we sell ‘em when we wean ‘em,” says Charlie Mosley.

Mosley is 73 years old and farming in Warren County got into his bones long ago.

“Yeah, I grew up on a farm when I was a little boy, yeah, in Alvaton. Alvaton, in the Greenhill area, up in there.”

But Mosley didn’t spend his life farming. He started M&L Electrical with a partner in 1975 and the company has grown to more than 300 employees.

Kentucky State Police are investigating how two inmates from the Warren County Jail walked away from a work detail this week. 

Twenty-five-year-old Bates Cole was captured the same day, while 23-year-old Anthony Embry was taken into custody after a two-day search. 

Warren County Jailer Jackie Strode told WKU Public Radio that all inmates who work outside are considered low-risk offenders.

"Nobody can be on it that has assaultive-type charges. Nobody can be on it that has sexual-type charges. It has to be lower felonies such as child support, forgery, maybe DUI-4th, that kind of thing."

The inmates eligible for work release are serving a five-year sentence or less.  Cole was in jail for violating parole. Embry was also serving time for a parole violation, as well as charges of Carrying a Concealed Deadly Weapon, Possession of a Firearm by a Convicted Felon, and Giving an Officer False Name or Address.

Asked how Embry was considered low-risk, Jailer Strode said the Kentucky Department of Corrections determines what classification level inmates are assigned.

Flickr/Creative Commons/M. Eaves

Thieves are taking advantage of the market demand for rustic and weathered wood that’s popular for furniture and flooring. Barn wood is being  stolen from farms in south central Kentucky.  

Warren County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Stephen Harmon says some of the wood has been stolen from barns in the Hadley and Richardsville areas of the county.

“We’ve had three calls in the last 60 days from farmers who noticed barn wood that’s been stolen from their barns in rural parts of the county. The barn wood is very expensive and that’s what’s drawing them. A lot of home décor items are made from this wood.”

Harmon says so far no arrests have been made.

So what we’re wanting farmers to do, especially if their barn is not on the property on which they live, is to kind of survey their barns, make sure that wood is not stolen. That way we can get a report from anyone that has barn wood that’s stolen, so we can hopefully follow up on leads and make some arrests in relation to these thefts.” 

Harmon says he has heard from other sheriff’s departments that barn wood is also being stolen in nearby counties.

Emil Moffatt

For 72 hours earlier this month, residents in Toledo, Ohio were told not to use the city’s water because of  toxic algae bloom.  It’s a story that gave many a renewed appreciation for being able to turn on a faucet and drink what comes out.

In Warren County, Bowling Green Municipal Utilities is in charge of the treating the water and delivering it to the community.

Doug Kimbler, superintendent of treatment plants,  took us  on a tour last week so we could get a better idea of what actually goes into the process.  We started by overlooking the source: the Barren River on the east side of downtown. Then, we briefly stepped inside.

“We have two pumps actually running in here right now, it’s fairly hot day for Bowling Green. We’ll probably produce somewhere between 21 and 22 million gallons of water between Bowling Green and Warren County for the day,” said Kimbler above the din of the pumps.

Kevin Willis

Some retired military veterans are asking Kentucky lawmakers to commit funding for a new long-term care facility for veterans that would be located in Bowling Green.

The commonwealth currently has only three such facilities, with a fourth veterans nursing home scheduled to open next summer in Hardin County.

Dr. Ray Biggerstaff served in Vietnam as a Captain with the 101st Airborne Division, based in Fort Campbell. He told state lawmakers in Frankfort that the number of veterans in the south-central Kentucky region makes Warren County a logical location for a long-term care operation.

“When we take a look at the demographic data for Bowling Green and the Barren River Area Development District, we’re looking at a total of 20,000 veterans in that particular area. Surrounding the area, we have an additional 22,000 veterans that are in the perimeter,” said Biggerstaff.

Biggerstaff said he also thought a long-term care facility for veterans in southern Kentucky could attract veterans who live in northern Tennessee.

In testimony before a joint committee on State Veterans, Military Affairs, and Public Protection, Biggerstaff said backers of the proposed veteran’s nursing home in Warren County have identified a 30-acre site off I-65 near the Kentucky Transpark as a possible location for the facility.

The nursing home being built in Hardin County will sit on 195 acres of land donated by the Defense Department, and feature a dozen ten-person homes providing full nursing services to 120 veterans. It’s scheduled to open next June.

Kentucky’s three nursing homes for veterans currently in operation are in Hopkins, Jessamine, and Perry counties.

Jenean Hampton

Veteran State Representative Jody Richards of Bowling Green is facing his first Tea Party challenger in the November election. Jenean Hampton is taking on the longest continuously serving state representative in Kentucky history. 

"There was much prayer involved. This wasn't my plan," said Hampton in an interview with WKU Public Radio. "Sometimes you're screaming at the TV, you see things that need to be improved, and you're screaming that someone needs do something, well sometimes that someone is you."

Hampton serves as chair of the Bowling Green-Southern Kentucky Tea Party. The 55-year-old Republican is an Air Force veteran and businesswoman who wants to use her private sector experience to spur economic development in the commonwealth.

In her first run at public office, Hampton is taking on political heavyweight Jody Richards who was first elected to the legislature in 1975 and served as House Speaker from 1995 to 2009. Over that time, he's become the recipient of several plum committee assignments, including Appropriations and Revenue.  Richards told WKU Public Radio that his influence in Frankfort could not be matched by a newcomer.

"No new person would have my committee lineup nor would they have the connections I do," he suggested. "I pride myself  in working well with both sides of the aisle."

A new $150 million aluminum production facility in Bowling Green will create 80 new jobs.

Governor Beshear was on hand Wednesday morning at the Kentucky Transpark as ground was broken on the Japanese-European partnership. The joint venture between Contellium N.V. and UACJ Corporation will create finished aluminum body sheets for cars and trucks.

Construction on the 225,000-square-foot facility will begin this summer.

Abbey Oldham

Cathy Roemer-Garrison is always looking out for innovative ways to teach.  She’s an English as a Second Language instructor at Moss Middle School in Warren County. 

"I came across on the Internet something about children reading to shelter animals, and that the research showed it was successful at improving reading fluency and building self-esteem, which is a perfect fit for my ELL kids," explained Roemer-Garrison.

She took the idea to Principal David Nole, who admits he was skeptical at first.

"I thought, 'How's that going to improve what we're doing?'  The more I listened the more I realized she was going about the heart of the reader, and that's just developing the love to read," Nole said.

And so it began.  An initiative called Paw Pals: Literacy with Love.  Every Wednesday, Roemer-Garrison visits the Bowling Green-Warren County Humane Society with a group of ELL students, or English Language Learners.  Most are from war-torn countries, but at the shelter, those memories are overcome with smiles and laughter.

On this visit, a shelter employee brings out eight-week-old long-haired Chihuahuas.

Seventh graders Graciella Ventura of El Salvador, and Soe Meh and Bway Baw both of Thailand, sit in a circle, each holding a puppy and a book.  Storytime is about to begin.  Ventura has a wide grin as one of the puppies licks her face.

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