recycling

Ryan Van Velzer

A bill filed ahead of this year’s legislative session would ban retailers from providing certain kinds of plastic bags and limit the use of plastic straws and foam containers.

Every year more than eight million tons of plastic end up in the oceans, costing at least $8 billion in damages to marine ecosystems, according to a UN Environment report. Among the largest sources of this pollution are plastic bags and single-use plastics.

 


City of Bowling Green

The city of Bowling Green will use its new recycling trailer for the first time on Oct. 18 at the downtown Harvest Festival.  

Getting the trailer was easier than finding companies that would take the material for recycling.

Bowling Green partnered with Western Kentucky University on a grant to cover the cost of four recycling trailers, with three for the university and one designated for the city to use at special events.

Bowling Green Environmental Manager Matt Powell said the city reviewed its recycling program and determined that it could increase the collection of recyclables with the flexiblity of a trailer that could be moved around to community events.  


Rhonda J. Miller

A manufacturer of recycled plastic products in Evansville, Indiana is experiencing a surge in business due, in part, to China halting the import of plastic trash last year. Green Tree Plastics is now expanding partnerships with major corporations.

The family-owned company is also meeting the growing demand from student groups to produce benches and picnic tables from what most Americans have been sending to landfills -  plastic bottle caps.

The playground at Holy Name Catholic School in Henderson, Kentucky has a couple of special benches. They’re made from recycled plastic caps and lids, from water  bottles, milk jugs, yogurt cups, toothpaste, coffee cans, peanut butter, and lots of other containers.