Rand Paul

Lisa Autry

U.S. Senator Rand Paul moved a presentation at Western Kentucky University on Monday outdoors, rather than put on a mask in compliance with the school’s COVID-19 policy

Senator Rand Paul was promoting his book The Case Against Socialism to a group of economics students when an administrator interrupted the Republican lawmaker to inform him of WKU’s mask policy.  Calling it ridiculous, Paul moved the class outdoors and continued speaking without a mask.  Paul said he thinks generalizing the risk of the coronavirus to everyone is wrong.

“I think each individual should get to make their choice on what their risks are," Paul said. "For young people under age 25, the death rate from the coronavirus is one in a million.”

Graham Ambrose

Residents of Paint Lick don’t like to dwell on what’s been lost: the grocery stores, the gas station, the barbershop, the local bank, and countless residents who have moved away or died. 

Instead, in this rural Appalachian town in Garrard County suffering decades of business loss, residents have championed an attitude that’s become something of a civic slogan: “Press on regardless,” in the words of a long-departed local leader, Dean Cornett.

What presses on are the few institutions that remain: a doctor’s office, an environmental consultancy, an auto mechanic, and what might be the most important institution of all — the post office.

 


As Republican Sen. Rand Paul left the White House on Thursday night, he was surrounded by a group of protesters and was escorted by police to a nearby hotel.

J. Tyler Franklin

You could say that Kentucky’s junior senator Rand Paul has assumed the position of contrarian-in-chief during the COVID-19 pandemic. He’s challenged public health experts and claimed Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear is a “dictator” because of restrictions imposed to help slow down the spread of the virus.

Many of Paul’s claims aren’t backed up by science, but in an age when politicians rarely get punished at the ballot box for such behavior, there may be little political risk for him.

Paul raised eyebrows last week for picking a fight with Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, during a Senate committee hearing.

 


Updated at 5:53 p.m. ET

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., has become the first senator to test positive for the coronavirus. His staff says he is asymptomatic.

In a statement released on Sunday, Paul's deputy chief of staff, Sergio Gor, wrote:

Abbey Oldham

Rand Paul says there’s no mystery concerning how the vote for President Trump’s upcoming trial in the U.S. Senate will turn out.

Sen. Paul predicts that none of the 53 Republican U.S. Senators will vote to remove Trump from office.

In an interview with The Hill, the Kentucky Republican said he thought every Senator, regardless of party, had already made up their mind about how they’ll vote.

“I think the votes have been decided. As much as anybody will be pretending to be judicious about this, I don’t think that there’s one senator who hasn’t decided how they’re going to vote,” Paul said. 


J. Tyler Franklin

Rand Paul of Kentucky is one of at least two Republican U.S. Senators supporting a Democratic resolution aimed at curbing President Trump's ability to launch future military strikes against Iran.

Sen. Paul and Mike Lee of Utah have publicly backed the resolution, which would place a 30-day deadline on the President to seek authorization from Congress for military action, except in a case of an imminent threat.

Politico reports the Senate version of the resolution could be introduced as early as next week.

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says her chamber will vote Thursday on its version of a resolution seeking to curtail Trump's actions against Iran.

A former Democratic Senate staffer was sentenced to two years of probation this week for helping another onetime staff member break into a Senate office late at night to hack government computers. Their actions exposed the private information of five Republican senators, in an act of retaliation for their support of Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination.

WFPL

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul said he believes the whistleblower, who filed a complaint alleging President Trump asked the President of Ukraine to investigate a political rival, and that White House staff intervened to “lock down” the record of the phone call, should come forward and be identified.

Paul made his comments to media Tuesday after a roundtable discussion hosted by the Purchase Area Development District in Graves County. 

“I think we probably deserve to know who the whistleblower is. You know, our criminal justice is predicated on if I accuse you of something, I have to show up in court and accuse you of it. So I think there’s reasons to have whistleblower statutes and to have anonymity,” Paul said. “But if you’re accusing a person of something where the ramifications are impeachment, I think that person ought to come forward.”

J. Tyler Franklin

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul celebrated President Donald Trump’s firing of national security adviser John Bolton on Tuesday, saying that the “chances of war go down greatly” with Bolton leaving the White House.

Paul has long criticized Bolton as being a war hawk who is too aggressive on foreign policy issues.

In a press call shortly after Bolton’s ouster, Paul said the president has surrounded himself with people who don’t want to intervene in foreign conflicts.


J. Tyler Franklin

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul is easing back into public activities after his recent lung surgery sidelined him for part of the August congressional break.

The Kentucky Republican is scheduled to give a speech Tuesday at a chamber of commerce luncheon in southern Kentucky. It marks his first public appearance since part of his lung was removed at a Tennessee hospital. The senator says the surgery stemmed from injuries suffered when a neighbor tackled him while he was doing yard work at his Kentucky home in late 2017.

Rand Paul Undergoes Lung Surgery Stemming from Assault

Aug 5, 2019
J. Tyler Franklin

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul says he underwent lung surgery in a procedure he says stems from injuries suffered when a neighbor tackled him outside his home in 2017.

The Republican lawmaker tweeted that part of his lung damaged in the assault was removed during the weekend surgery in Tennessee.

Paul expects to return to the Senate in September.

Both of Kentucky's senators are laid up with health issues during Congress' August break.

J. Tyler Franklin

U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky said in an interview that he would contribute to buy a ticket for Minnesota Congresswoman Ilhan Omar to visit her native Somalia.

Paul made the comments when asked by Breitbart News about racist tweets by President Donald Trump, saying Omar and three other Democratic congresswomen of color should “go back” to the “broken” countries they came from.

Three of the four were born in the U.S., while Omar is a naturalized U.S. citizen from Somalia.

J. Tyler Franklin

U.S. Senator Rand Paul said he wants to see lower prices and more transparency in the health care industry, but he doesn’t support the methods being used by President Trump.

Trump recently signed an executive order to increase pricing transparency for patients before they receive healthcare services. The order aims to bring prices down by letting people shop around. 

 

Paul, a Republican from Bowling Green, said that’s not exactly how the health care market works. 


Laura Elizabeth Pohl/Bread for the World

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul is sponsoring legislation that would reduce paperwork and streamline worker visa programs used by U.S. farmers. The Bowling Green Republican said the measure would be a major help for the commonwealth’s agriculture industry.

The bill would make it easier for farmers to apply for H-2A and H-2B visas used to employ temporary workers from other countries. Those work permits are often used in the equine, livestock, agriculture, and dairy industries.


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