obesity

Obesity In Some Kentucky Toddlers On Decline

Nov 22, 2019
USDA

Obesity is on the decline among Kentucky toddlers whose moms get food assistance from a federal program, according to a new report out Thursday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The study applied to toddlers ages two- to four-year-old who were enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). It’s for pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women, as well as children up to age five who have lower incomes.

Nearly 16 percent of kids ages two to four with WIC were obese in 2016, a drop from about 18 percent in 2010. While the number is moving in the right direction, Kentucky Youth Advocates Executive Director Terry Brooks cautioned that Kentucky still lags behind most of the U.S.

USDA

A report released Thursday by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation finds nearly 323,000 children are obese in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Ohio. Obesity rates among the region’s children remain some of the highest in the nation.

West Virginia has the nation’s second-highest rate of obese children, Kentucky third, and Ohio tenth.

Mississippi has the highest rates of children with obesity, 24.5 percent. Utah has the lowest rate at 8.7 percent. The national average is 15.3 percent.


Creative Commons

A new report shows the number of Kentucky’s preschoolers who are obese dropped by about 5 percent between 2010 and 2014. However, the obesity rankings for the state’s high school students and adults were among the worst in the U.S.

 

According to the State of Obesity report by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Kentucky has the eighth highest adult obesity rate in the nation. The obesity rate for the state’s children ages 10 to 17 is the 14th highest in the country.

Last year more than 20 percent of the state’s high school students were obese. The adult ranking wasn’t much better. More than 34 percent of adults in Kentucky were obese in 2016.

WalletHub

A new study shows Kentucky is the sixth fattest state in the nation. The study by WalletHub examines three areas--the number of obese and overweight people in each state; health consequences; and food and fitness. Kentucky ranked fifth for the highest percentage of adults with type two diabetes. The Commonwealth also ranked in the top five with the highest percentage of physically inactive adults.

Tennessee is the third fattest state in the nation and Indiana ranked tenth. WalletHub used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Sarah Jane Sanders

Candy, candy canes, candy corn and syrup. Those are the four basic food groups according to Buddy the Elf. And this time of year, the gluttonous season, it seems like he is onto something.

But researchers say that mindful eating –choosing quality over quantity and savoring your meals instead of, say, plowing through another pint of Ben & Jerry’s while watching “Westworld” — can make a difference.

That’s especially important because the Ohio Valley has a serious problem. In Ohio more than a quarter of adults are obese. In Kentucky it’s about a third. And in West Virginia, it’s even higher.

 

“For this exercise let’s just go ahead and close our eyes.” University of Kentucky Professor Dr. Geza Bruckner starts his class on Mindful Eating at Lexington Healing Arts.

There are about 20 people in the class, mostly middle aged women, although there are a few men and, as might be expected, some Birkenstocks are in view. The strain shows on their faces as they try to clear their heads and do what should come naturally: breathe.

Creative Commons

Kentucky has the fifth highest obesity rate in the nation.

The commonwealth also has the dubious distinction of being only one of two states that saw an increase in obesity levels between 2014 and last year.

The figures come from a new report by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Read the Full Report Here

The latest data show that 34.6 percent of Kentucky’s adults were obese in 2015. Kentucky had the third-highest rate of obese whites, and the fifth-most African-Americans who were obese.

Only Kentucky and Kansas saw an increased rate of adult obesity. Four states saw a decrease, and the rest were stable.

U.S. Army

Obesity is the leading medical reason why nearly three-quarters of young Kentuckians are not eligible to join the armed forces.

A report from the group Mission: Readiness is based on U.S. Defense Department data, and shows nearly 33 percent of Kentucky teens are overweight or obese.

Read the report here.

Retired U.S. Marine Major General Jerry Humble of Russellville is a member of the group, and says other factors disqualifying young Kentuckians from military service are criminal records and a lack of high school diploma.

“We’re really worried about the future—the next 10 to 12 years—of our military armed forces. And the world isn’t becoming a kinder, gentler place, either,” Humble said.

The report, entitled Retreat Is Not An Option for Kentucky, also finds:

* 78 percent of Kentucky adolescents do not get the recommended hour of daily exercise.

*The military currently spends $1.5 billion annually on obesity-related medical costs and to replace those discharged because they are physically unfit.

Report: Obesity Often Keeps Kentuckians From Serving in Military

Oct 7, 2014
U.S. Army

A new report shows that many young adults in Kentucky are ineligible for military service due to obesity.

Retired Army Major Gen. Allen Youngman presented the report, "Retreat is not an option for Kentucky," during the Southern Obesity Summit Monday in Louisville.

Youngman says being overweight is the leading medical disqualifier for military service in Kentucky.

Combined with factors like lack of education and having a criminal background, Kentucky’s disqualification rate is 73 percent, three points higher than the national average.

"They don't have to be in perfect shape when they come in but to pass a certain point it's been demonstrated over and over again that it would be doing them a disservice and a disservice to the military to  put them into uniform and expect them to meet the standards," said Youngman.

Obesity doesn't just affect potential recruits.  Youngman says there was a 61 percent increase in obesity among active duty members between 2002 and 2011.