Mitch McConnell

Ryland Barton

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he thinks the Senate will pass a bill attempting to block President Trump’s national emergency declaration over border security, but that Congress wouldn’t be able to override a veto.

McConnell made the comments during a press conference in Louisville on Monday morning.

“There will be enough votes to pass the resolution of disapproval, which will then be vetoed by the president and then all likelihood the veto will be upheld,” McConnell said.

Amy McGrath's campaign

The top Democrat in the U.S. Senate is actively recruiting a challenger to take on Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York has met with Amy McGrath, the Democratic nominee in last year’s race for Kentucky’s 6th District U.S. House seat. McGrath lost that race by three points.

But the retired Marine fighter pilot gained national attention during the race as one of several female military veterans who ran for Congress.

J. Tyler Franklin

Police in Kentucky were called to a protest by a group of federal government workers at a field office for Sen. Mitch McConnell.

The protestors arrived at the Lexington office in hopes of handing off some letters to the senator's staff about the government shutdown, said Chon Jung, an organizer. Jung said it was a "peaceful demonstration" though some protesters banged on windows of the office.

Kentucky's two U.S Senators both have well-funded political action committees. But the two spend their PAC money in very different ways.

The Louisville Courier-Journal reports Republican Mitch McConnell spent the majority of funds last year from his PAC, the Bluegrass Committee, on national, state and local campaigns.

About 80 percent of donations to the Bluegrass Committee came from other PACs, instead of individuals.

Updated on Jan. 23 at 6:45 p.m. ET

The Senate is set to consider two competing proposals Thursday that could reopen the government — but probably won't.

Republicans are planning a vote on President Trump's proposal to end the stalemate. But Democrats are reiterating that his offer — with $5.7 billion for a border wall in exchange for temporary protections for those under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and temporary protected status programs — is a nonstarter, meaning there's no realistic end yet in sight for the shutdown.

Federal Medical Center Lexington / facebook

Workers at federal prisons in Kentucky are among those feeling the financial pressure of the partial federal government shutdown. A nurse who works at a prison in Fayette County said working without pay is raising the level of stress for employees.

Robin Goode works at the Federal Medical Center in Lexington. It’s a prison for about 1,500 male and female inmates who require medical or mental  health care.

Goode is president of Local 817, the local union with about 400 members that’s part of the American Federation of Government Employees.

She said she’s heard a lot of sad stories from prison workers since paychecks were suspended during the shutdown.


Sydney Boles

With just days left before a Congressional deadline, advocates for black lung treatment are still pushing Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell to secure funding for miners’ benefits.

About two dozen people demonstrated Wednesday near McConnell’s regional office in London, Kentucky, carrying placards reading “Black Lung Kills” and singing along with a banjo tune modified for the occasion.

“Oh, Mitch McConnell, when will you answer? Somebody’s knocking at your door.” 

Sydney Boles

On a cool but clear November day about a dozen residents from eastern Kentucky’s coal mining region crowded into the lobby of an office building in the small town of London, Kentucky. That’s where Kentucky’s powerful senior senator, Mitch McConnell, has his local field office. 

McConnell’s staff let the local advocates for black lung treatment into the office a few at a time to make their case for funding the federal Black Lung Disability Trust Fund.

There was a lot of laughter and plenty of selfies, but there was tension, too. Many of these residents know miners and families affected by the deadly disease who depend on benefits from the fund, and they know the clock is ticking on a tax that has supported the fund for more than 35 years.


Facing Pressure, McConnell Agrees to Criminal Justice Vote

Dec 11, 2018
NPR

Under pressure from President Donald Trump and many of his Republican colleagues, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he will bring legislation to the floor to overhaul the nation's sentencing laws.

McConnell's decision comes after more than three years of overtures from a large, bipartisan group of senators who support the criminal justice bill, including Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley and House Speaker Paul Ryan. Trump announced his support for the legislation last month, but McConnell treaded cautiously, as a handful of members in his caucus voiced concerns that it would be too soft on violent criminals.

Ryland Barton

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says the Trump Administration’s latest regulatory rollback for coal-fired power plants will benefit Kentucky families — despite the government’s own analysis showing it will have little to no impact.

Last week, the Environmental Protection Agency moved forward with plans to raise the limits on the amount of carbon dioxide new and reconstructed coal-fired power plants can emit. The EPA’s rollback will change Obama-era restrictions so that new coal plants can emit an extra 500 pounds of carbon dioxide per megawatt-hour.

Paul to Kentuckians: Tell McConnell to Allow Vote on Criminal Sentencing Reform

Dec 10, 2018
J. Tyler Franklin

Seeking to stir support for a federal criminal justice bill, Sen. Rand Paul on Monday called on voters in the hometown of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to prod him to hold a vote on the measure.

Paul said during an appearance at the Louisville Urban League that the measure would pass overwhelmingly if it received a Senate vote during Congress' lame-duck session. But McConnell has refused to bring the legislation forward in a standoff that's dividing the Republican majority.

Becca Schimmel

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky has a message for Democrats as they prepare to take control of the House of Representatives next year.

The Louisville Courier-Journal reports McConnell says Democrats in the chamber should avoid using their new majority to conduct what he calls “presidential harassment”.

The Kentucky Republican compares threats from the left to investigate many parts of the Trump presidency to the impeachment of Bill Clinton in the 90’s. McConnell says Clinton’s numbers increased while the G-O-P underperformed in the next election.

Michelle Hanks

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says recent shootings at a grocery store in Louisville and a synagogue in Pittsburgh should be considered hate crimes and called for the death penalty against the accused gunmen.

Police say that Gregory Alan Bush killed two people, both black, at a Kroger in the Louisville suburb of Jeffersontown last week. Court records and social media posts suggest he had a history of making racist remarks.

White House video

A year after President Donald Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency, he signed a bipartisan bill Wednesday to bolster law enforcement efforts and expand addiction treatment and resources.

Proponents hope the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act helps the Ohio Valley, which suffers some of the nation’s highest rates of addiction and overdose deaths.

And Ohio Valley lawmakers had a strong influence on the package.


NPR

The Senate's majority leader, insisting his chamber won't be irreparably damaged by the bitter fight over new Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, is signaling he's willing to take up another high court nomination in the 2020 presidential election season should another vacancy arise.

"We'll see if there is a vacancy in 2020," said Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

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