Matt Bevin

J. Tyler Franklin

This week in Kentucky politics, Gov. Matt Bevin said he’s partnering with a former Democratic congressman to help people navigate the state’s new Medicaid rules. We found out that lobbyists set a new spending record at the state legislature as lawmakers made changes to the tax code. Plus, a state-funded aluminum mill broke ground in northeastern Kentucky and  Bevin asked for a judge to recuse himself from the lawsuit over the new pension bill.


Ryland Barton

Kentucky Republicans aren’t all on the same page when it comes to a potential state takeover of Louisville’s public school system.

Gov. Matt Bevin is in favor of it, saying that local officials haven’t been able to fix longstanding problems in the district like a pervasive gap between the academic performances of white and minority students.

Cabinet For Health and Family Services/Screenshot

Ahead of the July 1 start date for changes to Kentucky’s Medicaid program, Governor Matt Bevin has announced a partnership with the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky to help educate enrollees on new requirements and assist some in making mandated payments to keep Medicaid insurance.

The Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, which primarily works to push health-related issues through Frankfort and commissions health studies, will create a separate foundation to run the Medicaid outreach.

Youtube

Governor Matt Bevin on Thursday appointed Adam Meier as secretary of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services, which is responsible for running almost every government-involved health program in Kentucky.

Meier will replace Vickie Yates Brown Glisson, who stepped down earlier this year to run against Representative John Yarmuth in Louisville. The cabinet oversees the adoption system, foster care, child welfare, Medicaid, food assistance, hospital inspections, among others.

J. Tyler Franklin

Governor Matt Bevin has launched a pilot program that will give high school graduates paid apprenticeships in Kentucky’s social services offices across the state.

The program would give apprenticeships to people interested in social work who are impacted by generational poverty or haven’t had the opportunity to go to college.

Bevin said the state needs more people working in social services.

J. Tyler Frankin

Governor Matt Bevin has gone after Franklin Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd several times in recent years. Shepherd is one of two trial court judges who hears certain lawsuits brought against the state.

Bevin has repeatedly accused him of being a “political hack” because he worked in Democratic Governor Brereton Jones’ administration back in the late 1980s.

After Shepherd ruled against a procedural motion filed by Bevin’s lawyers earlier this week, Bevin lashed out at the judge again on 55KRC radio in Cincinnati.


J. Tyler Franklin

After suffering a minor loss in the lawsuit over Kentucky’s new pension law on Monday, Gov. Matt Bevin lashed out at the judge overseeing the case again, calling him an “incompetent hack.”

On 55KRC radio in Cincinnati Tuesday, Bevin accused Franklin Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd of “legislating from the bench” and favoring his opponent in the case, Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear.

“We do typically lose in this guy’s court because he’s not really operating a court of law, it’s a court of his opinion,” Bevin said.

Ryland Barton

Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear said his office has won another victory in the effort to have recent changes to the state’s pension plans declared unconstitutional.

A judge has issued a protective order related to the case. The order will prevent Governor Matt Bevin’s administration from taking sworn testimony from three organizations named in a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the pension bill.

 

Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd ruled against Governor Bevin’s request to depose the office of the Attorney General, the Kentucky Education Association and the Kentucky State Lodge Fraternal Order of Police. In a video statement Beshear praised the judge’s decision granting the protective order.

J. Tyler Franklin

This week in Kentucky politics, Gov. Matt Bevin weighed in on the potential state takeover of Louisville’s public school system; the leader of Kentucky’s House of Representatives called for an investigation into a statewide broadband internet project; and a Republican state Representative abruptly dropped out of her re-election campaign, saying that this year’s legislative session was the “nastiest” in history.


Ryland Barton

Governor Matt Bevin says problems in Louisville’s public school system are so severe that “we have got to make changes.” Bevin’s comments come a day after the state’s top education official recommended a takeover of Kentucky’s largest school district.

On Monday, Education Commissioner Wayne Lewis released a 90-page audit that recommended the state intervene in the management of Jefferson County Public Schools due to under-performing schools, racial disparities in student performance and abuse of students.

education.ky.gov

Kentucky’s interim commissioner of education has released an audit recommending that the state take over Louisville’s public school system.

The state board of education will have final say on whether to approve interim Education Commissioner Wayne Lewis’ request.

In a summary of the audit’s findings, Lewis said that the district has “deep-seated organization and cultural challenges.”

“The current state of JCPS is not the fault of any one leader or group. Instead, under the leadership of many and over a long period of time, serious challenges emerged and in many cases were permitted to fester,” Lewis wrote.

J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin’s administration is seeking to disqualify Attorney General Andy Beshear and his office from participating in a lawsuit filed last week over recent pension reform.

The motion filed Tuesday in Franklin Circuit Court alleges Beshear has a conflict of interest, because he provided legal advice to Kentucky lawmakers on Senate Bill 151. It includes pictures from Twitter of Beshear meeting with House and Senate Democratic leaders “to discuss legal options on pension bill” and speaking at a rally at the Capitol protesting the bill’s passage.

J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin apologized Sunday for saying that children were sexually abused because they were left home alone while teachers rallied to ask lawmakers to override his vetoes.

The Republican issued his apology in a nearly four-minute video posted online, saying "it is not my intent to hurt anybody in this process, but to help us all move forward together."

J. Tyler Franklin

As one of its final acts of this year’s legislative session, the Republican-led Kentucky House of Representatives passed a resolution formally condemning Gov. Matt Bevin for saying that teachers neglected students by attending protests in Frankfort on Friday, leading to child abuse.

The reprimand came after Democrats and several Republican statehouse leaders demanded an apology from Bevin for the remarks.

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The American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit to block a new Kentucky law putting more restrictions on abortions.

The ACLU filed the suit late Tuesday, shortly after Republican Gov. Matt Bevin signed the measure, which took effect immediately.

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