Matt Bevin

Ryland Barton

Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear squared off in another gubernatorial debate Monday night, one of the last opportunities for voters to see the candidates make their cases before Election Day.

Bevin and Beshear bickered their way through the debate on KET, while moderator Renee Shaw repeatedly brought them back to substantive policy issues like how to raise more money for the state, how to address the state’s pension debt and whether to keep the state’s Medicaid expansion.

 


Disastrous Disconnect: Coal, Climate And Catastrophe In Kentucky

Oct 28, 2019
Illustration by Joanna Eberts

This story is part of a series about the insufficient protections for vulnerable people as natural disasters worsen in a warming climate. The Center for Public Integrity and four partners – the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, High Country News, Ohio Valley ReSource and StateImpact Oklahoma – are contributing stories.

REGINA, Ky. — Todd Bentley stepped onto his porch and saw the storm swelling the creek near his home. If this kept up all night, he feared, the creek could overflow its banks and wash out his neighborhood’s road. He headed out into the rain with his teenage son to secure his mother’s trailer across the street.


J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear participated in another televised debate Saturday night ahead of the Nov. 5 gubernatorial election.

Bevin and Beshear once again illustrated their sharp differences on issues like abortion, health care, taxes, and whether to legalize casino gambling to try and bring in more revenue for the state.

At one point Beshear criticized Bevin for making inflammatory statements like his claim from over the summer that casino gambling leads to suicide.

Bevin denied ever making the comment.

 


J. Tyler Franklin

A judge has ruled that Gov. Matt Bevin had the authority to fire two staffers who worked for Lt. Gov. Jenean Hampton earlier this year.

Hampton sued to try and reverse Bevin’s move earlier this year, arguing that she is an independent constitutional officer who has sole authority to hire and fire her own staff.

But Franklin Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd disagreed in a ruling on Friday, saying that Hampton’s office is subordinate to Bevin’s.

 


Ryland Barton

Gov. Matt Bevin says that if he’s reelected, he’ll push for changes to the state’s tax code, including a shift from the income tax to a sales tax and raising the state’s gas tax.

Bevin made the comments during the Kentucky Association of Counties’ (KACo) annual conference on Wednesday at the Galt House Hotel in downtown Louisville. He also suggested eliminating the state’s estate and inventory taxes and allowing local governments to raise the sales tax.

Bevin said that the state needs to “stop taxing the job creators and the wealth producers.”

 


Creative Commons

A new poll shows Gov. Matt Bevin and Attorney General Andy Beshear in a dead heat ahead of next month’s gubernatorial election.

The same polling firm showed Bevin trailing Beshear by eight percentage points last December.

Now, 46 percent of likely voters say they’ll vote for Bevin, 46 percent say they’ll vote for Beshear and 7 percent are undecided.

Bevin leads among men, older and rural voters while Beshear has more support with women, younger voters in metropolitan areas, according to the poll.

J. Tyler Franklin

Eight minutes into the governor’s debate on Tuesday, moderator Shannon Cogan urged the audience at Lexington’s Singletary Center to remain silent. The candidates’ verbal jousts elicited whoops, boos, cheers and rare bits of laughter through the hour-long debate reflecting an audience as clearly divided on policy as the two men on stage.

Republican Gov. Matt Bevin and Democratic challenger Andy Beshear found little common ground during the debate on the University of Kentucky campus; that was evident on the hot-button issue of abortion.

Elena Kuhn

Three weeks before Election Day, some public school teachers in Kentucky are pressing voters to make Matt Bevin a one-term governor. 

Several retired educators brought what they call their “Won’t Be Bullied By Bevin” tour to Bowling Green on Tuesday.  The group made stops last week in Henderson and Pikeville.

The tour, spearheaded by the Kentucky Democratic Party, is working to elect Bevin’s Democratic challenger, Andy Beshear, in the Nov. 5 election. 


Ryland Barton

Former White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders threw her support behind Gov. Matt Bevin’s reelection campaign during an event in Louisville on Monday.

Sanders praised Bevin for his backing of President Donald Trump and said voters need to reelect him to build up “a great base of support ahead as we go into what we know is going to be a very difficult 2020 race for the president.”

“This is the beginning and it starts with all the people right here,” Sanders said.

Ryland Barton

Gov. Matt Bevin held a press conference Friday to remind voters that he opposes abortion and has signed several anti-abortion bills into law.

Standing next to a poster that proclaimed him as “America’s most pro-life governor,” Bevin accused reporters of not reporting on the fact that his opponent, Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear, supports abortion rights.

“The sad reality, if we don’t gather people and put this in your face to this degree, you don’t cover it,” Bevin said.

Ryland Barton

The Kentucky Education Association is calling for a state investigation into political emails teachers in several rural Kentucky school districts received at work.

The teachers in at least eight districts received emails criticizing Democratic gubernatorial candidate Andy Beshear over the last two weeks. The emails went to the teachers’ public school email addresses and were sent from an unknown supporter of Republican Gov. Matt Bevin. Bevin has said that his campaign was not behind the effort.

Teachers are not allowed to use their emails for political purposes.

Ryan Van Velzer

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin said Friday he would accept help from a foreign government to investigate corruption regardless of whether or not it involved a political rival.

Bevin’s comments came during a press conference with the express purpose of antagonizing journalists into asking Democratic gubernatorial candidate and Attorney General Andy Beshear about his stance on the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

“Does he support impeachment of the president or not? Yes or no?” Bevin said. “It’s not complicated. Why is it none of you have demanded this answer of him?”

Hampton Pushes Back on Reasons for Being Dropped from Ticket

Oct 4, 2019
J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky Lt. Gov. Jenean Hampton pushed back Friday against Gov. Matt Bevin's explanation for dropping her from his reelection ticket, saying she was unaware of any disagreements about her priorities until the governor discussed their political split at a tea party meeting.

The Republican governor told tea party activists meeting Thursday in Louisville that he and Hampton didn't see eye to eye on where Hampton's time was best spent, the Courier Journal reported.

Hampton, who has sued Bevin for the firing of her two top assistants earlier this year, staunchly defended her work as lieutenant governor and said she was unaware of any concerns about her priorities in office.

Ryland Barton

Gov. Matt Bevin says he will push to stop taxing the retirement income of veterans during next year’s legislative session if he’s reelected.

Bevin said he would include the proposal in a larger tax reform initiative while lawmakers are hammering out a two-year budget plan next year.

Bevin made the comments at a campaign event in Louisville surrounded by a group of veterans supporting his reelection.

 


J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky Chief Justice John Minton has removed a judge presiding over a lawsuit between Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear and Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration because of a Facebook “like.”

The Bevin administration asked Minton to disqualify Franklin Circuit Court Judge Phillip Shepherd because he “liked” a Facebook post that was supportive of Beshear while presiding over the teacher “sickout” lawsuit.

Minton ruled that even though Shepherd had liked Facebook posts that were supportive of both Bevin and Beshear, the state’s judicial code of conduct requires disqualification “in circumstances where the judge’s impartiality might reasonably be questioned.”


Pages