Matt Bevin

Lawmakers Vote Against Kentucky Medicaid Contracts

23 hours ago
Ryland Barton

A panel of state lawmakers has unanimously disapproved and voted against $8 billion worth of Medicaid contracts issued by Gov. Matt Bevin’s administration.

In the last hours of Bevin’s term as governor, the outgoing Finance Cabinet Secretary could override that disapproval, but any override may be moot as Gov.-elect Andy Beshear’s incoming Finance Secretary could also nullify the contracts.

Bevin’s Finance Cabinet awarded contracts to five insurance companies to administer Medicaid benefits for Kentucky enrollees two weeks ago. Two of the contracts to companies that had previously provided the service in Kentucky — Anthem of Kentucky and Passport Health — were not renewed.

Becca Schimmel

If Gov.-elect Andy Beshear fulfills his campaign promise to replace the members of the Kentucky Board of Education, he would be the first governor to do so since lawmakers tried to insulate the board from political pressures in 1990 as part of the Kentucky Education Reform Act.

Beshear, a Democrat, has said he would overhaul the Board of Education by executive order “on day one,” a rallying point for many educators who disagreed with priorities of the current 11-member board appointed by Republican Gov. Matt Bevin.

Beshear has also said he hopes that the board would replace its only employee, Education Commissioner Wayne Lewis, who was hired shortly after Bevin’s appointees took control of the board in 2018.

J. Tyler Franklin

Outgoing Gov. Matt Bevin claimed he lost his reelection because Democrats “harvested votes in urban areas.”

Gov.-elect Andy Beshear named some of his cabinet secretaries. And education commissioner Wayne Lewis defended himself as his job might be in jeopardy in the new administration.

Jonese Franklin from member station WFPL talked to Capitol reporter Ryland Barton for this week’s edition of Kentucky Politics Distilled.


J. Tyler Franklin

A memo from the outgoing administration of Governor says Governor-elect Andy Beshear faces a massive budget shortfall as he prepares to take office. 

The note from Bevin's budget director estimates the shortfall could exceed $1 billion over the next two years.The legislature will deal with rising costs and a host of competing demands for funding, including pensions, corrections, Medicaid, and employee health benefits.

 

The memo was sent to Beshear's transition team and state lawmakers. Beshear takes office next Tuesday and will submit a two-year spending plan to the legislature early next year.

Kyeland Jackson

During a series of interviews on talk radio shows Wednesday morning, outgoing Republican Gov. Matt Bevin said that he lost his race for reelection because the Democratic Party “harvested votes in urban communities.”

Bevin lost to Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear last month by a little more than 5,000 votes.

During an interview on 55KRC in Cincinnati, Bevin said that the election was a “surprise” that defies logic.

 


J. Tyler Franklin

In one of his last acts before leaving office, Governor Matt Bevin has pardoned a Kentucky man convicted of sexually abusing his young stepdaughter. The man is serving a life sentence stemming from the alleged crime 20 years ago.

Paul Donel Hurt was convicted in Jefferson County in 2001 of sodomizing and sexually abusing the girl, who was six at the time of the crime. 

“Hindsight is never truly 20\20, but it appears to me and to many others, including the judge who sentenced him, that Paul Donel Hurt has been wrongly convicted and imprisoned for nearly 20 years," Bevin wrote in his executive order.

Thinkstock

This week in Kentucky politics, Gov. Matt Bevin said he’s going to return to the private sector after losing his race for reelection.

Gov.-elect Andy Beshear named the first appointees of his administration. And incoming Secretary of State Michael Adams says he wants to clean Kentucky’s voter rolls and get a voter ID bill passed before next year’s elections.


J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky lawmakers again questioned University of Louisville’s decision to purchase Jewish Hospital and other assets it acquired from Kentucky One Health during a legislative meeting on Tuesday.

The takeover was finalized earlier this month with hopes that the state legislature would approve a $50 million loan to help finalize the university’s move.

University of Louisville President Neeli Bendapudi told a panel of lawmakers that the purchase helped avoid the closure of the hospital system, which the university’s medical school relies on for many of its clinical programs.


Ryland Barton

For the past four years, Kentucky officials have been trying to institute a policy requiring some Medicaid recipients work or do community service to keep their health coverage. It’s been a pillar of Republican Gov. Matt Bevin’s policy priorities, but with Bevin soon leaving office and Democratic Governor-Elect Andy Beshear opposed to the requirement, it would be up to the legislature to continue that effort. 

However, it appears there’s little appetite among Republican legislators who would have to lead that legislative fight. 

J. Tyler Franklin

Gov. Matt Bevin says that he looks forward to returning to the private sector once his term as governor ends on December 10.

Bevin, a Republican, lost his race for reelection by about 5,000 votes to Democratic rival Andy Beshear. A recanvass of the election results only produced one additional vote for a write-in candidate.

When asked what he will do next during an interview on Fox and Friends on Saturday, Bevin said “we’ll see.”

“I find myself now back to exactly where I’ve been,” Bevin said. “The private sector is a wonderful place, it really is. It served me well for years and I look forward to returning.”

 


J. Tyler Franklin

This week in Kentucky politics, Gov. Matt Bevin conceded his race for reelection, paving the way for Gov.-elect Andy Beshear to take office next month. 

Bevin requested a recanvass of the results after losing by about 5,000 votes, but the process only produced one new vote. Meanwhile, Andy Beshear has begun assembling his administration


Update: Gov. Bevin Concedes, Says He Won't Contest Election Results

Nov 14, 2019
J. Tyler Franklin

Update: Republican Gov. Matt Bevin Tuesday afternoon said he will not contest the Nov. 5 election results, and conceded the race to Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear. 

A recanvass Tuesday undertaken by all 120 counties appears to show no change in the vote totals, confirming that Beshear defeated Bevin by nearly 5,200 votes.  

Lisa Autry

Another Republican lawmaker in Kentucky has come out against the idea of Gov. Bevin contesting results of the Nov. 5 election in the state legislature. 

According to unofficial tallies, the GOP incumbent was defeated by 5,189 votes by Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear. 

Bevin claims there were voting “irregularities,” but has shown no evidence.  Republican state Senator Mike Wilson of Bowling Green says if the recanvass doesn’t change the results, Bevin should move on.

“You have to show clear, compelling evidence that there was fraud that would have changed the outcome of the election," Wilson said in an interview with WKU Public Radio.

Joseph Lord

All county boards of elections in Kentucky will convene Thursday morning to recanvass the results of the governor’s race. 

Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear claimed victory over Governor Matt Bevin in the Nov. 5 election, with unofficial results showing Beshear with a 5,189-vote lead statewide.  Bevin refused to concede the race, citing “irregularities,” which have been unsubstantiated.  

The purpose of a recanvass is to verify the accuracy of the vote totals reported from voting machines.  Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes says she doesn’t believe the difference in the vote can be made up by Bevin.


Ryland Barton

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says that it appears Gov. Matt Bevin has lost his bid for reelection, even though Bevin still hasn’t conceded the race.

Bevin has requested a recanvass of the final tally that showed Beshear winning by more than 5,000 votes last Tuesday. A recanvass is a minimal double check of each county’s final election results and historically has only produced minor differences in the final count.

But on Monday, McConnell signaled that the race was over.

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