Kentucky Utilities

Ryan Van Velzer

Ashes from the coal burned to fuel America’s appetite for energy are buried in unlined pits and landfills scattered across the country.

Now, first the first time, the American public is learning the impacts these coal ash dumps are having on the environment. The results point to widespread contamination.


LG&E/KU Customers Stuck Paying For Disbanded Trade Group

May 15, 2019
LG&E

Louisville Gas & Electric and Kentucky Utilities’ latest rate hike puts ratepayers on the hook to pay $269,000 for a secretive utility industry organization that is going out of business.

Power companies including LG&E charge customers to cover part of their dues for the Utility Air Regulatory Group, which argues against tighter clean air rules. Currently, Congress is investigating UARG over ethical conflicts between the group and a top Trump-appointee in the Environmental Protection Agency.

LG&E

With the latest rate hike, Louisville Gas and Electric and Kentucky Utilities customers will help pick up the tab for membership dues at trade groups that lobby against environmental protections.

Whether customers like it or not, LG&E’s natural monopoly guarantees that everyone buying service in their territory will pay into these trade groups, even if those groups lobby against customers’ own interests.

Ryan Van Velzer

Ashes from the coal burned to fuel America’s appetite for energy are buried in unlined pits and landfills scattered across the country.

Now, first the first time, the American public is learning the impacts these coal ash dumps are having on the environment. The results point to widespread contamination.

And Kentucky’s Ghent Generating Station — located along the Ohio River an hour north of Louisville — ranks among the 10 worst contaminated coal ash sites in the country, according to a report released Monday from the Environmental Integrity Project, an environmental advocacy group.

Net Metering Bill Returns To Kentucky Legislature

Feb 12, 2019
Gray Watson/Creative Commons

A Republican state senator has introduced net metering legislation that would require state regulators to set rates for the solar power that customers feed back into the electricity grid.

The measure would likely reduce the rate residential solar customers receive for providing excess power to the grid.

Utilities backing the measure say it ensures costs are kept low for all customers, while opponents, including the state’s burgeoning solar industry, say it would dramatically slow the adoption of solar in the state.