Kentucky Secretary of State

While official results of Kentucky’s primary election won’t be known until early next week, both parties are calling the voting process a win. 

Republican Secretary of State Michael Adams says Kentucky offered the nation a model for success in conducting an election during a pandemic. 

"I’m proud of the resilient Kentucky voters who refused to let a virus disenfranchise them," Adams said in a statement. "While in so many categories Kentucky remains near the bottom, today Kentucky is first in something – conducting elections, even under extreme circumstances, and exhibiting grace under pressure."


Lisa Autry

Kentuckians head to the polls on Tuesday to select party nominees for the presidency and U.S. Senate, as well as some state legislative seats. 

The June 23 primary is fitting for 2020:  unconventional in every way.  The coronavirus postponed the election by more than a month and changed how most voters will cast their ballot.

Kevin Mays works as a chief financial officer in Bowling Green. He’s been voting for more than 30 years, but this will be the first time he’s not voted on election day. Mays and his family recently voted absentee for the first time.

Lisa Autry

A group of Kentucky voters, including a state lawmaker, has filed a federal lawsuit against Governor Andy Beshear and Secretary of State Michael Adams.  The suit challenges the minimal number of polling locations for the June 23 primary election.

The lawsuit was filed this week by State Representative Jason Nemes and voters in Jefferson, Fayette, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. The county clerks and local boards of election in those counties are also named as defendants.

The lawsuit alleges there will be “significant voter suppression” if there’s only one in-person polling location in each county. 

Kyeland Jackson

Incoming Secretary of State Michael Adams says he wants to “clean” Kentucky’s voter rolls and get the legislature to pass a voter ID law before next year’s election season.

The moves by Kentucky’s incoming chief election officer would have significant implications for next year’s political races, when Kentuckians will vote for contests in the U.S. Senate, Congress, all 100 seats in the state House of Representatives and half of the 38-member state Senate.

Adams, a Republican, made the comments before the legislature’s Interim Joint Committee on State Government as he outlined his priorities for the next four years.


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Some political observers may be scratching their heads over how a reliably red state that embraces President Donald Trump chose a Democrat over the Republican incumbent for governor in last week’s election in Kentucky. 

Outgoing Attorney General Andy Beshear emerged the apparent winner with a more than 5,100-vote advantage over Matt Bevin. 

Joel Turner, a political science professor at Western Kentucky University, doesn’t think the governor’s race was a referendum on President Donald Trump, whom he expects to win Kentucky again in the 2020 election by 20 to 30 points.  Turner says the results from the Nov. 5 contest instead reflect widespread dissatisfaction with Bevin.

Matt Bevin campaign

Kentucky’s chief election officer says she doesn’t think Governor Matt Bevin will be able to successfully challenge the results of Tuesday’s election. 

According to unofficial results, the Republican incumbent lost to Democrat Andy Beshear by 5,189 votes.

Bevin formally requested a recanvass on Wednesday, which will be conducted Thursday, November 14.  The process requires county clerks to make sure the vote totals from each machine were recorded accurately.

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Polls open on Tuesday, November 5 at 6 a.m. and close at 6 p.m local time. If you’re in line at 6 p.m., you will be allowed to vote. You can view your sample ballot by going to the Kentucky Secretary of State's website.

If you’re wondering if you’re registered to vote in Kentucky (and hopefully you are, because the deadline to register and still vote in November was last month!) you can check on the Secretary of State’s website.

Acceptable forms of identification include a driver’s license, credit card, social security card, personal acquaintance of an Election Officer, any other identification with both your picture and signature, or any U.S. government-issued ID card.

Lisa Autry

The Democrat running to be the next Secretary of State says Kentucky has a problem maintaining accurate voter rolls, and Heather French Henry says a new process is needed to update the database. 

A judge ruled this week that the state Board of Elections must remove 170,000 voters from an inactive list before the election on November 5. 

In a wide-ranging interview with WKU Public Radio, Henry said everyone involved with maintaining the voter database must be more fair and transparent in the future.

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The Republican who is running for Secretary of State in Kentucky has ties to former Missouri Governor Eric Greitens. Greitens resigned last year amid accusations of campaign impropriety.

Attorney Michael Adams is running against Democrat Heather French Henry, the former commissioner of the Department of Veterans Affairs, in the election on Nov. 5. The Secretary of State oversees all elections in Kentucky.

Adams serves as a board member as well as the secretary and treasurer of A New Missouri, a dark money nonprofit created by Greitens. Missouri lawmakers alleged the nonprofit was designed to sidestep campaign disclosure laws and that Greitens illegally coordinated with it.

A judge has ruled in favor of the Kentucky Democratic Party in its lawsuit against the state Board of Elections. 

Franklin Circuit Court Judge Thomas Wingate issued an injunction on Monday against the State Board of Elections to remove 175,000 voters from an inactive list prior to the November 5 election. 

The Kentucky Democratic Party filed suit over the inactive list last week.  In his order, Judge Wingate said the best way to ensure a just and fair election in the Commonwealth would be a return to the status quo.

The Kentucky Democratic Party has filed a lawsuit against the state Board of Elections.  The complaint stems from the board placing around 170,000 voters on an inactive list.

The Kentucky Democratic Party said it became aware of the inactive list after noticing that the state’s voter registration numbers declined by more than 167,000 between June and July. 

Democrats called on the board last month to halt the policy and restore the voter registration rolls.

Lisa Autry

The Kentucky Republican hoping to succeed Alison Lundergan Grimes as Secretary of State believes the office is on probation until Grimes’ term ends in January. 

Michael Adams, an election law attorney in Louisville, is pledging to restore confidence in the office if elected in November. 

The state legislature stripped Grimes of some of her authority over elections after a member of the Kentucky Board of Elections filed a complaint alleging she abused her power.  Grimes has adamantly denied the claims, calling them politically motivated.  Adams says he doesn’t think the action was aimed at the office, but the officeholder.


Today is the deadline to register to vote in the November 5 election and Kentucky’s secretary of state is issuing a warning to voters. 

Alison Lundergan Grimes is urging citizens to check their voter registration status to make sure they aren’t considered inactive. 

The Kentucky Democratic Party recently filed a complaint, alleging more than 150,000 voters had been put on an inactive list by the State Board of Elections as part of an effort to clean up the state’s voter registration rolls.

On a September afternoon at Western Kentucky University, pop culture mingled with politics during a Rock the Vote registration drive.  A recording of Taylor Swift's "Look What You Made Me Do" played in the background, as Jeb Veeck with College Republicans manned an information table on campus.

"Are you thinking about joining College Republicans?", he asked a student.

As a Republican, Veeck has a lot of company.  In Kentucky, the GOP has been outpacing the Democratic party in terms of new voters for many years. 

Lisa Autry

Former Miss America Heather French Henry says her experience working with veterans would translate well to the Secretary of State’s office.  The Democratic nominee spoke to the Bowling Green Noon Rotary Club on Wednesday.

As former Commissioner of the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs, French-Henry says she worked with the Secretary of State’s Office to create polling locations in veterans’ nursing homes and to eliminate filing fees for new veteran-owned businesses, among other things.  She says leading the department gave her administrative, fiscal, and legislative experience.


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