Kentucky Republican Party

On a September afternoon at Western Kentucky University, pop culture mingled with politics during a Rock the Vote registration drive.  A recording of Taylor Swift's "Look What You Made Me Do" played in the background, as Jeb Veeck with College Republicans manned an information table on campus.

"Are you thinking about joining College Republicans?", he asked a student.

As a Republican, Veeck has a lot of company.  In Kentucky, the GOP has been outpacing the Democratic party in terms of new voters for many years. 

J. Tyler Franklin

Gov. Matt Bevin is feuding with the Republican leaders of the state legislature after he vetoed the pension bill that passed on the last day of this year’s legislative session.

The bill would have allowed regional universities and other agencies to exit the state’s pension system to avoid a spike in their pension costs. It would have also allowed the state to take over the agencies’ finances if they default on pension payments and suspend benefits of their retirees.

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White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders is speaking this month at the Republican Party of Kentucky's Lincoln Dinner.

The event is set for Aug. 25 in Lexington. Sanders will join Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Gov. Matt Bevin and U.S. Rep. Andy Barr at the dinner.

State Republican Party Chairman Mac Brown called Sanders "one of the most recognizable messengers for Republicans" and said the party is eager to hear from her regarding GOP accomplishments during President Donald Trump's time in office.

Political consultant Scott Jennings will be emcee for the dinner.

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Next week, Kentucky voters will head to the polls to weigh in on primary elections, including who to nominate for state legislative elections this fall.

All 100 seats in the state House of Representatives and half of the 38 seats in the state Senate are up for re-election this year.

At least 40 current and retired educators are running after the legislature voted to make changes to retirement for current and future teachers and other state workers.

And a wave of retirements from the statehouse has sparked hotly contested primaries, with both of Kentucky’s major political parties hoping to flip districts in their favor.

Kentucky Democratic Party

The new leader of the Kentucky Democratic Party says the “Republican experiment” has failed. 

In an interview with WKU Public Radio, Chairman Ben Self accuses the GOP of waging a war on the middle class by creating right-to-work and prevailing wage laws. 

He also thinks sexual harassment allegations looming over Republicans and a pension proposal rejected by many public employees jeopardizes some House GOP members in next year’s elections.

Republicans gained control of the Kentucky House last year for the first time since 1921, but Self believes Democrats have a real opportunity to take back the chamber.