GM

Sergio Martinez-Beltran | WPLN

Members of the United Auto Workers union in Spring Hill cited the future of temporary workers at General Motors as a main reason why many of them voted against a deal meant to end the weeks-long strike with the automaker.

The Spring Hill local has rejected the proposal 51% to 49%, in one of the first votes on the contract nationwide.

Beth Bigley, 44, has been in the picket line for the last six weeks. She voted against the tentative agreement presented on Monday, mostly because she feels temporary workers are still not getting what they deserve.

Autoworkers From Closed Plants Fight New GM Contract

Oct 22, 2019
Lisa Autry

If they can close our plant, they can close yours, too.

That's the message from workers at three shuttered General Motors factories that didn't get new products under the tentative contract agreement reached last week between GM and the United Auto Workers, who have been on strike against the company across the U.S. for over six weeks now.

About 2,000 employees who once worked at GM transmission plants near Baltimore and Detroit and a small-car assembly plant in Lordstown, Ohio, will repeat that message this week as 49,000 union members vote on the new four-year deal.

Approval could end the walkout that has crippled GM's production and cost the company an estimated $2 billion.

GM Workers to Stay On Picket Line Until Vote on New Contract

Oct 18, 2019
Lisa Autry

Striking General Motors workers will stay on the picket lines for at least another week until they vote on a tentative contract with the company.

Factory-level officials from the United Auto Workers union voted to recommend the agreement to members at a daylong meeting in Detroit Thursday. But they also voted not to return to factories unless members approve the deal.

About 49,000 workers have been on strike for more than a month, paralyzing GM's U.S. factories and costing the company an estimated $2 billion.

Lisa Autry

Striking General Motors employees in Bowling Green and across the nation could be headed back to work in a few days. 

GM and the United Autoworkers Union have reached a tentative deal over a new contract that would end a month-long work stoppage.

"We can confirm the UAW’s statement regarding a proposed tentative agreement," said Dan Flores, Manager of GM Corporate News Relations. "Additional details will be provided at the appropriate time."

General Motors and the United Auto Workers have reached a tentative agreement to end the strike that began one month ago, the labor union announced Wednesday. The UAW GM National Council will vote on the deal Thursday.

When the national council reviews the deal's terms, it will also decide whether nearly 50,000 workers should remain on strike or whether they should go back to work before the full membership ratifies the agreement.

Lisa Autry

Some hourly workers at the Corvette Assembly Plant in Bowling Green say they’ll remain on the picket line as long as it takes to get a fair contract with General Motors.  Some local workers are struggling financially but remain steadfast as a national strike enters week four.

After making some progress on major sticking points, talks broke down over the weekend, reportedly over moving production from Mexico to the U.S.  The UAW’s chief negotiator said bargaining had "taken a turn for the worse."

Lisa Autry

The impact of the national strike by United Auto Workers at General Motors plants across the country is starting to hit home in Bowling Green.

Some of the 900 hourly workers at the GM Corvette Assembly Plant in Warren County are walking the picket lines for a second week as the two sides try to reach a new contract. 

John Silver works in the body shop at the plant.  He says the only pay he and other hourly workers are receiving is $250 a week from the union.

“It will pay for your gas back and forth and will buy you a couple of sandwiches, but you ain’t gonna pay your bills with it or your rent," Silver told WKU Public Radio.

Lisa Autry

General Motors employees in Bowling Green are back on the picket lines for the second day of a nationwide strike. 

The automaker and union are at an impasse over a new contract.  Nearly 50,000 hourly workers are seeking better pay, benefits, and job security.

In a move that surprised local union leaders on Tuesday, GM shifted employee healthcare costs to the UAW.  The union wanted the automaker to cover those costs through the end of the month.

Lisa Autry

There are no cars rolling off the assembly line in Bowling Green, or for that matter, any General Motors Plant in the nation.

About 900 hourly workers at the Corvette Assembly Plant are on strike after negotiations over a new labor contract hit a stalemate.

Some of the workers in Bowling Green are picketing outside the Corvette Assembly Plant,  joining roughly 49,000 of their counterparts in the first nationwide strike involving GM since 2007.

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET Monday

Talks between General Motors and union officials representing tens of thousands of striking autoworkers restarted Monday in hopes of driving both sides to an agreement on issues including workers' wages, health care and profit-sharing.

After several hours, union officials representing nearly 50,000 workers acknowledge negotiations remain in neutral.

Lisa Autry

General Motors and the United Auto Workers Union begin negotiations on Tuesday over a new, four-year contract.  The talks will impact about 900 hourly workers at the Corvette Assembly Plant in Bowling Green.

Despite announcing plans in November to close five U.S. plants, General Motors says it has no plans to move more production overseas.  CEO Mary Barra reiterated the claim in April during a visit to the Corvette Assembly Plant in Bowling Green.


GM

General Motors is making a major investment in the Corvette Assembly Plant in Bowling Green. 

Top executives from the automaker held a news conference at the factory on Thursday afternoon to announce that GM is adding a second shift and more than 400 hourly jobs to support production of the new production of a new Corvette model, known as the C8.

Despite criticism from President Trump over GM closing the Lordstown, Ohio plant earlier this year, CEO Mary Barra said GM is committed to keeping production in America.

“Since 2009, we’ve invested more than $22 billion," stated Barra. "In this plant alone, more than $900 million.  We’re investing in this country, creating in good paying jobs, and we’re really proud of that.”

Updated at 3:16 p.m. ET

General Motors says it plans to cease production of some models at three vehicle assembly plants in the U.S. and Canada in 2019. It also plans to cut production at two plants in the U.S. that make transmissions. The company said the moves are part of an effort to cut 15 percent of its workforce.

It's part of a major restructuring that will prioritize the company's electric and autonomous vehicle programs.

GM

General Motors will temporarily close the Bowling Green assembly plant next month as the automaker tries to reduce a growing inventory of cars on dealer lots.

The Corvette plant will be idled for one week. GM will also halt production at four other plants ranging from one to three weeks.

Another glitch in the new 2015 Corvette, built at the Bowling Green Assembly Plant, is coming to light. General Motors is warning owners not to use the "Valet Mode" of the Performance Data Recorder to secretly record audio in their cars because many states have laws against recording someone without his or knowledge.

GM posted a notice to dealers on a website for Corvette owners last week explaining the problem and saying a software update due next month should take care of the issue.

USA Today is reporting that, in the meantime, if owners choose to use the surreptitious recording system, they must tell everyone in the car a recording is taking place and obtain their permission.

Earlier this month GM asked dealers to stop delivery of about 2,000 cars until a part that attached the air bag to the steering wheel was fixed. Another 800 Corvettes, mostly already at dealerships, were being held because only one of the rear parking brake cables may have been fully engaged.

Both problems have been taken care of and those cars were released last week.

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