GM

Lisa Autry

Some hourly workers at the Corvette Assembly Plant in Bowling Green say they’ll remain on the picket line as long as it takes to get a fair contract with General Motors.  Some local workers are struggling financially but remain steadfast as a national strike enters week four.

After making some progress on major sticking points, talks broke down over the weekend, reportedly over moving production from Mexico to the U.S.  The UAW’s chief negotiator said bargaining had "taken a turn for the worse."

Lisa Autry

The impact of the national strike by United Auto Workers at General Motors plants across the country is starting to hit home in Bowling Green.

Some of the 900 hourly workers at the GM Corvette Assembly Plant in Warren County are walking the picket lines for a second week as the two sides try to reach a new contract. 

John Silver works in the body shop at the plant.  He says the only pay he and other hourly workers are receiving is $250 a week from the union.

“It will pay for your gas back and forth and will buy you a couple of sandwiches, but you ain’t gonna pay your bills with it or your rent," Silver told WKU Public Radio.

Lisa Autry

General Motors employees in Bowling Green are back on the picket lines for the second day of a nationwide strike. 

The automaker and union are at an impasse over a new contract.  Nearly 50,000 hourly workers are seeking better pay, benefits, and job security.

In a move that surprised local union leaders on Tuesday, GM shifted employee healthcare costs to the UAW.  The union wanted the automaker to cover those costs through the end of the month.

Lisa Autry

There are no cars rolling off the assembly line in Bowling Green, or for that matter, any General Motors Plant in the nation.

About 900 hourly workers at the Corvette Assembly Plant are on strike after negotiations over a new labor contract hit a stalemate.

Some of the workers in Bowling Green are picketing outside the Corvette Assembly Plant,  joining roughly 49,000 of their counterparts in the first nationwide strike involving GM since 2007.

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET Monday

Talks between General Motors and union officials representing tens of thousands of striking autoworkers restarted Monday in hopes of driving both sides to an agreement on issues including workers' wages, health care and profit-sharing.

After several hours, union officials representing nearly 50,000 workers acknowledge negotiations remain in neutral.

Lisa Autry

General Motors and the United Auto Workers Union begin negotiations on Tuesday over a new, four-year contract.  The talks will impact about 900 hourly workers at the Corvette Assembly Plant in Bowling Green.

Despite announcing plans in November to close five U.S. plants, General Motors says it has no plans to move more production overseas.  CEO Mary Barra reiterated the claim in April during a visit to the Corvette Assembly Plant in Bowling Green.


GM

General Motors is making a major investment in the Corvette Assembly Plant in Bowling Green. 

Top executives from the automaker held a news conference at the factory on Thursday afternoon to announce that GM is adding a second shift and more than 400 hourly jobs to support production of the new production of a new Corvette model, known as the C8.

Despite criticism from President Trump over GM closing the Lordstown, Ohio plant earlier this year, CEO Mary Barra said GM is committed to keeping production in America.

“Since 2009, we’ve invested more than $22 billion," stated Barra. "In this plant alone, more than $900 million.  We’re investing in this country, creating in good paying jobs, and we’re really proud of that.”

Updated at 3:16 p.m. ET

General Motors says it plans to cease production of some models at three vehicle assembly plants in the U.S. and Canada in 2019. It also plans to cut production at two plants in the U.S. that make transmissions. The company said the moves are part of an effort to cut 15 percent of its workforce.

It's part of a major restructuring that will prioritize the company's electric and autonomous vehicle programs.

GM

General Motors will temporarily close the Bowling Green assembly plant next month as the automaker tries to reduce a growing inventory of cars on dealer lots.

The Corvette plant will be idled for one week. GM will also halt production at four other plants ranging from one to three weeks.

Another glitch in the new 2015 Corvette, built at the Bowling Green Assembly Plant, is coming to light. General Motors is warning owners not to use the "Valet Mode" of the Performance Data Recorder to secretly record audio in their cars because many states have laws against recording someone without his or knowledge.

GM posted a notice to dealers on a website for Corvette owners last week explaining the problem and saying a software update due next month should take care of the issue.

USA Today is reporting that, in the meantime, if owners choose to use the surreptitious recording system, they must tell everyone in the car a recording is taking place and obtain their permission.

Earlier this month GM asked dealers to stop delivery of about 2,000 cars until a part that attached the air bag to the steering wheel was fixed. Another 800 Corvettes, mostly already at dealerships, were being held because only one of the rear parking brake cables may have been fully engaged.

Both problems have been taken care of and those cars were released last week.

GM

Long-time United Auto Workers Union President Eldon Renaud is out at the Bowling Green General Motors Plant. 

Spokeswoman Andrea Hales confirmed that Renaud is no longer employed at the plant.  Renaud had no comment when contacted Thursday morning by WKU Public Radio.  He served as the local UAW president since 1982 and had been a GM employee for more than 40 years. 

Renaud had been critical of Plant Manager Dave Tatman, who resigned abruptly in February.   In April, the union voted to authorize a strike if the plant didn’t resolve some safety and quality issues.  A strike never occurred.

Renaud also served as Bowling Mayor from 1996 to 2000. 

During her grilling before Congress last week, General Motors CEO Mary Barra insisted the new General Motors is different and better than the old one.

So as GM begins to fix nearly 2.6 million vehicles for an ignition-switch defect that has been linked to at least 13 deaths, we decided to put that claim to the test.

Exactly how new is the new GM?

NBC's Saturday Night Live answered with a parody version of Barra's explanation:

thesupercars.org

General Motors says it is investing $350 million and will create and retain at least 1,800 jobs at its plant in Spring Hill, Tennessee.  

While the automaker isn’t saying what new vehicles will be made at the plant, GM announced Tuesday that it will add two midsize vehicle programs to the facility, making good on a promise to the United Auto Workers union during negotiations in 2011.

The Tennessean reports that some analysts have suggested the vehicles might be the Cadillac SRX, which is currently made in Mexico, and the Buick Anthem, which GM has in development. The Spring Hill plant served as the headquarters and main assembly facility for GM’s now-defunct Saturn brand before production was halted in 2009.

The UAW says the jobs generated by the new auto production will be filled mainly by local hires, as opposed to the union’s normal practice of transferring displaced workers from other areas.

The news comes on the heels of a recent report showing Tennessee is, for a fourth consecutive year, ranked No. 1 in automotive manufacturing strength in the nation.

Lisa Autry

General Motors is enhancing its footprint in Bowling Green. Officials gathered at the Corvette plant Wednesday to announce a $3.5 million investment. The automaker is moving its performance built center from Michigan to Bowling Green.

The center specializes in building high performance engines. GM Manufacturing Manager Arvin Jones says the move is expected to create or retain 20 jobs. 

“We’re working out the details with the international union and ourselves on how we’re going to bring those folks down, but they have the right to follow the work," said Jones.

gm.com

The next generation Corvette is no longer a secret. With much fanfare, General Motors unveiled a revamped Corvette in Detroit Sunday night, the first new version of the iconic sports car in nine years.

"This car is all new from the ground up and it's absolutely the best performance car we know how to engineer and build," said General Motors North America President Mark Reuss. "I will eagerly put this car up against any of the top performance cars in the world. In terms of design, technology, and performance, this car is second to none."

The 2014 model, so new that it shares only two parts with the current model, picks up cues from the 1963 Stingray. It's described as the most powerful standard model ever, but GM promises it will be the most fuel-efficient Corvette. At the unveiling in Detroit, Reuss offered kudos to the Bowling Green plant for bringing the car the life.

"A few weeks ago we traveled to Bowling Green and drove the first cars made at the plant. Their commitment made this Corvette worthy of the Stingray name once again," praised Reuss.

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