e-cigarettes

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Kentucky’s Department for Public Health announced Tuesday that it is now investigating 25 cases of a lung disease associated with vaping. One case has been confirmed. The state also recommended against using vaping products while a nationwide outbreak continues.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week said there are now more than 1,080 cases of these lung illnesses across 48 states. The federal agency says almost a quarter of sickened patients are between the ages 25 and 34. Another 39 percent are between ages 18 and 24. 

Department for Public Health Commissioner Angela Dearinger said in a press release that the state is working with the Food and Drug Administration, local health departments and the CDC.

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Kentucky is investigating one potential case of a mysterious vaping-related lung illness that’s linked to a nationwide outbreak, the state’s Cabinet for Health and Family Services announced Friday. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is currently investigating 450 cases across 33 states, including the 215 cases reported last week. At least three people have died in Indiana, Illinois and Oregon.

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The Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky says a new law that went into effect this year has helped increase the number of schools in the state that are now tobacco-free. Kentucky lawmakers earlier this year passed a law banning students, employees and volunteers from using any tobacco products — including e-cigarettes — on school grounds or during school events. 

Data from the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky released last week show that prior to passage of the new law, 74 school districts had policies banning vaping or e-cigarettes. Now, an additional 74 districts have taken up the policy, a total of 84 percent of public school districts in Kentucky. Enforcement of the law is left up to schools.

Can Pharmacists Help Smokers Quit? This State Thinks So

Aug 20, 2019
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Indiana has one of the highest smoking rates in the country -- nearly one in five Hoosiers smoke. Now, a new statewide policy makes it easier for smokers to get medication to help them quit. But some people want state leaders to do more. 

On one side of 10th street in Sheridan, Ind., is a store that sells e-cigarettes and cannabis-derived oil, known as CBD. On the other side, sits one of the pharmacies taking advantage of the new state policy. It allows pharmacists to give out the medication -- without a doctor’s prescription. 


kickbuttsday.org

Communities across Kentucky will join a national event on March 20 aimed at discouraging the use of  e-cigarettes and tobacco.

National 'Kick Butts Day' is a day of activism organized by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids.

More than 1,000 events will be held across the U.S., with the main focus on getting young people to kick the e-cigarette habit, especially Juul, which looks like a computer flash drive and comes in appealing flavors like mango, fruit and mint.

In Bowling Green, Western Kentucky University will host a campus-wide 'Cigarette Butt Clean Up Day.'

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A bill that would ban the use of tobacco products on public school grounds across the state is making a last-minute bid in the Kentucky legislature after being stalled for weeks.

House Bill 11 would ban students, employees and volunteers from using any tobacco product, including e-cigarettes, on school property or during school events.

Rep. Kim Moser, a Republican from Taylor Mill and sponsor of the bill, said that school districts can vote to “opt out” of the ban.

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A bill that would ban tobacco products and vaping in Kentucky public schools passed through a state House Committee Thursday.

Republican Rep. Kim Moser from Taylor Mill is sponsor of the measure. She said the ban would send a message to students. 

“I think that it’s very important that we set certain expectations for our students and stop normalizing tobacco use,” Moser said during the hearing.

Mary Meehan

The Juul fits easily in the palm of your hand. You don’t light it, you trigger it with a click of a finger. The mist that is exhaled is so fine it’s hard to see. The nicotine is delivered via a pod the size of a AAA battery, with each pod containing the equivalent of 20 cigarettes.

That combination of small size and potent power makes the Juul the vaping device of choice for many teen users. A group of students from Casey County, Kentucky, affirms those features make “Juul-ing” – yes it has become a verb – rampant in class.

“Yes, oh yes,” they all nod in agreement.


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E-cigarettes and smoking hookah have gained popularity among middle and high school students in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The number of middle and high school students using e-cigarettes tripled from 2013 to 2014.

Among high school students, 13.4 percent were found to be using e-cigarettes in 2014 compared with 4.5 percent in 2013. The number of middle school students using e-cigarettes also tripled from 1.1 percent in 2013 to 3.9 percent in 2014.

Vince Willmore, vice president for communication at the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids, said marketing of e-cigarettes has played a big role in young people using the product.

“They’re available in flavors that appeal to kids like cotton candy and gummy bear, so it’s not surprising that kids are using more of these products because they’re being marketed in the very same way that regular cigarettes have been marketed to kids,” he said.

E-cigarettes may do more harm than previously thought, according to a report published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

NPR reported last week on a study that found vapor produced by electronic cigarettes can contain a surprisingly high concentration of formaldehyde — a known carcinogen.

Daviess County Public Schools

Daviess County Public Schools has become the latest district to ban e-cigarette use by students. Superintendent Owens Saylor says whether or not the devices are hazardous to one’s health, they’re intended for use by adults

“We have a parents committee here called the Council of Councils and there’s been some good discussion there about what’s in the health interest of our students,” said Saylor. “So, anything that would even represent smoking or inhalants or anything like that is not appropriate for our students. That’s why we felt like this was really an addition on to our tobacco ban and it’s a way for us to keep up with what’s happening."

Saylor also says e-cigarettes became a distraction.

“I think we’ve seen them popping up – and we’re learning a couple things. They’re expensive items, to begin with.  There were even situations where we had folks complaining that they were being stolen,” said Saylor. “And we’re not about to chase someone’s personal smoking device.”

Anyone younger than 18 would be barred from buying electronic cigarettes in Kentucky under a bill the state Legislature has approved.

The Senate gave the bill final approval on Monday. It will become law unless Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear vetoes it.

Teenagers under 18 are already banned from buying tobacco products in Kentucky. This bill updates that ban to include electronic cigarettes.

Electronic cigarettes resemble traditional cigarettes, except they are battery powered and the person inhales a vapor instead of smoke.

The ban would prohibit anyone under 18 from buying, possessing or using electronic cigarettes.

A bill that would restrict the sale of e-cigarettes to minors is one step closer to becoming law.  The Kentucky Senate passed the measure on a nearly unanimous vote, with only two Senators voting “no”.

The bill treats e-cigs like traditional tobacco products.  Although e-cigs don’t contain tobacco, some people worry, and some studies have shown, that use of the devices could lead young people to start using tobacco.  A similar bill is being considered by the Kentucky House.

While electronic cigarettes may be marketed as alternatives that will keep teenagers away from tobacco, a study suggests that may not be the case.

Trying e-cigarettes increased the odds that a teenager would also try tobacco cigarettes and become regular smokers, the study found. Those who said they had ever used an e-cigarette were six times more likely to try tobacco than ones who had never tried the e-cig.

LRC Public Information

The House Licensing and Occupations Committee advanced legislation Wednesday that would make it illegal to sell electronic cigarettes to anyone under the age of 18.  Under House Bill 309, the devices would fall under the same rules as tobacco products.  The bill is sponsored by Shively Democratic Rep. Joni Jenkins and now moves on to the full House for consideration.  

When asked whether e-cigs would be taxed like tobacco products, Jenkins said she would defer to the House Appropriations and Revenue Committee.

E-cigarettes produce vaporized nicotine. NPR reported earlier this week on the popularity of the products for teens.   Potential long term health effects from e-cigarettes are still unknown.

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