diversity

Kentucky Department of Education

The Kentucky Department of Education's first ever chief equity officer has experience with adversity, segregation, and public schooling.

The Arkansas native and nationally honored former school superintendent, Dr. Thomas Woods-Tucker, plans on taking those lessons with him to the Bluegrass State.

The Kentucky Board of Education issued a resolution in July declaring its commitment to addressing inequality. It was a move that helped convince Woods-Tucker to take the position.

During a conversation this month WKU Public Radio, just days after starting the job, Deputy Commissioner Woods-Tucker said few other states have taken that step.


Tennessee Colleges of Applied Technology Murfreesboro / Facebook

Tennessee’s colleges of applied technology are getting some outside help to address education inequity. That’s thanks in part to the Tennessee Board of Regents expanding an existing community college partnership with national nonprofit Achieving the Dream.

“During such a challenging time, it’s more important than ever to meet uncertainty with resilience, innovation, and a deepened commitment to student success and equity,” says Karen A. Stout, president and CEO of Achieving the Dream.

 


Becca Schimmel

A resettlement agency in Bowling Green is looking for mentors to pair with high school-aged refugees. It’s part of a new effort called the Refugee Youth Mentorship Program.

Refugees in their sophomore of high school up to the year after their senior year are eligible to be paired with a mentor. The youth will set their own goals with their mentor in hopes of improving academics, resume building, or career coaching.

Jessie Meier is the volunteer and youth mentorship case manager at the Warren County-based International Center of Kentucky. She said the program will fill an unmet need for the refugee community.


English, Lucas, Priest, and Owsley

A new program in Bowling Green is aimed at increasing the diversity of the city’s legal and law enforcement communities.

The Legal Diversity Pipeline Project involves the Bowling Green Police Department, Warren County Courts, a Bowling Green law firm and two local high schools.

About 60 freshmen from Bowling Green High and Warren Central will meet Friday with Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice John Minton, Jr. and U.S. District Judge Robert Stivers, visit the 911 dispatch center at the city’s police department, and tour the Warren County Jail.

Nonviolent Owensboro Facebook

As Americans look toward the New Year, there’s a universal hope for peace in a world so often troubled by conflict and war. Members of a group called Nonviolent Owensboro are working to create a little more of that peace, beginning in their own community.

Nonviolent Owensboro was founded a year ago by Mary Danhauer, a family nurse practitioner at the Green River District Health Department. She launched the group after hearing about a similar organization in Carbondale, Illinois. It's part of a national effort called ‘Nonviolent Cities’ that has the goal of creating more compassionate communities, a mission that matches Danhauer's long-time interest in social justice.  

WalletHub

The U.S. is in a state of uncertainty – and controversy– with impending changes on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, in the next few months. Immigration and diversity are ‘hot-button’ issues.

A new survey on diversity by the consumer website WalletHub found Kentucky near the bottom of rankings.   

WalletHub based its state-by-state rankings on diversity across several metrics, including household income, educational level, race, language, religion and variety of industries.  Kentucky came in at number 45 in the overall ranking of the most diverse states in America.

Lacy Hale

Updated story:

Organizers say they have postponed a counter-rally organized by local youth due to “previously unforeseen credible threats to the safety of our attendees and our community,” according to organizer Ariana Velasquez.

The “Rally for Equality and American Values” had previously been moved from a centrally located city park to the local college campus, which is further from downtown and is a weapon-free zone.

Earlier this week, the city issued a ban on masks and hoods, which Pikeville City Manager Donovan Blackburn described as stemming from online rumors that counter-protest groups could be coming into town with the intention of inciting riots.