Brett Kavanaugh

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Investigators from the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee say that a Louisville woman lied about being the author of an anonymous letter that included sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

In a referral to the Justice Department, the Judiciary Committee’s Chair Chuck Grassley said that a Louisville resident named Judy Munro-Leighton falsely claimed that she was the author of an anonymous handwritten letter that alleged Kavanaugh and another boy raped her in a car in high school.

NPR

The Senate's majority leader, insisting his chamber won't be irreparably damaged by the bitter fight over new Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, is signaling he's willing to take up another high court nomination in the 2020 presidential election season should another vacancy arise.

"We'll see if there is a vacancy in 2020," said Sen. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

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Tennessee’s Democratic U.S. Senate nominee said Friday he supports Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Former Governor Phil Bredesen had previously avoided a public commitment on the issue.

Bredesen released a statement this morning just as the U.S. Senate was finalizing a cloture vote that allows a final confirmation vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination.

Updated at 8:41 p.m. ET

Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court cleared a key procedural hurdle in the Senate on Friday, and his confirmation now seems all but certain, after a key swing vote, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, declared her support in a speech on the Senate floor.

Moments after Collins completed her remarks, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., announced in a statement that he too will support the nomination when it comes up for a final vote.

That final vote is expected as soon as Saturday.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The American Bar Association said the Senate should not hold a confirmation vote on Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court until the FBI investigated sexual assault allegations against him that were made by Christine Blasey Ford and other women.

Updated at 7:50 a.m. ET

Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, along with the American public, are hearing, for the first time, on Thursday directly from Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault when they were both teenagers in high school.

Michelle Hanks

Mitch McConnell says that sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have been brought forward “in an irregular manner,” accusing Democrats of searching for a scandal to try and delay or derail the confirmation process.

First reported by the New York Times, a woman accused Kavanaugh and a male friend of sexual assault more than 30 years ago at a party when they were teenagers.

Kavanaugh is currently a judge on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals and was nominated by President Trump to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court following the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy.

The confirmation of a Supreme Court justice is often a major event that ripples through American law for decades. But Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing, which opens Tuesday, is especially historic because, if confirmed, Kavanaugh is expected to solidify a hard-right majority on the nation's highest court, a majority the likes of which has not been seen since the early 1930s, and which is likely to dominate for a generation or more.

With the balance of the Supreme Court in question, some abortion-rights advocates are quietly preparing for a future they hope never to see — one without the protections of Roe v. Wade.

Over a dozen years as a judge on the federal appeals court in Washington, D.C., Brett Kavanaugh has weighed in on controversial cases involving guns, abortion, health care and religious liberty.

But after Kavanaugh emerged on President Trump's shortlist for the Supreme Court, a suggestion the judge made in a 2009 law review article swiftly took center stage:

"Provide sitting presidents with a temporary deferral of civil suits and of criminal prosecutions and investigations," Kavanaugh proposed.