Amy McGrath

Abbey Oldham

A new poll shows Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell leading Democratic challenger Amy McGrath by 17 points in Kentucky’s U.S. Senate race this year.

The survey of 793 likely voters in Kentucky by Washington D.C. based firm Morning Consult shows McConnell leading McGrath 53% to 36%. The poll was conducted between July 24 and Aug 2.

McConnell is running for his seventh term in the Senate, though this is the first year he is running while also serving as the majority leader, the high-profile position that allows him to set the agenda of the chamber and wield influence on which bills come up for votes.

Kevin Willis

Kentucky Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Amy McGrath is launching a statewide voter registration initiative.

McGrath is joining local leaders and voting rights advocates Saturday in Hopkinsville, Lexington, Louisville, and Owensboro to register new voters ahead of the November general election.

McGrath is trying to unseat Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

During a campaign visit in Bowling Green Friday, McGrath said she wants all registered voters in Kentucky to be able to cast ballots through the mail this November, as a way of protecting people from the coronavirus.

The retired U.S. Marine fighter pilot said the number of people who voted through the mail in Kentucky’s recent primary election shows it’s the right thing to do.

Becca Schimmel | WKU Public Radio

Amy McGrath was the first woman to fly an F/A-18 fighter jet in combat. She flew 89 missions during her 20-year military career, worked as a foreign affairs adviser in Congress, then worked in the Pentagon and finally became a Naval Academy instructor.

To top off her impressive credentials, at age 13 she wrote Mitch McConnell to ask that he help undo the federal policy that banned women from fighting in combat.

But, as she said in her campaign announcement last summer, “he never wrote back.”

 


Amy McGrath

Democratic Senate candidate Amy McGrath has filed a motion to intervene in a federal lawsuit demanding more in-person polling locations in Kentucky’s most populous counties.

Most Kentucky counties will only have one polling location for the June 23 primaries after mail-in voting was expanded to all eligible voters in Kentucky to prevent long lines during the coronavirus pandemic.

The lawsuit was originally filed by Republican state Rep. Jason Nemes and McGrath has asked to join the challenge, arguing that the current scheme restricts citizens’ right to vote.

“As has been seen in the other states that have restricted the number of polling sites, it is expected that lines in the populous Kentucky counties that are only providing a single voting location will be excessively long, leading many who intended to vote in-person to abstain from voting at all,” the lawsuit states.

Facebook/Daviess County Clerk

Daviess County has hired temporary workers to handle an increasing number of mail-in ballots arriving ahead of Kentucky's June 23 primary election.

Residents are being encouraged to vote by mail in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

So far, Daviess County has mailed out more than 7,300 absentee ballots and has 4,300 more in the queue that will soon be mailed out.

When voters request an absentee ballot through the online state portal at GoVoteKY.com, each one has to have three labels printed - one for the mailing envelope, and then an inner and outer label for the voter to return the ballot to the county clerk.


Becca Schimmel | WKU Public Radio

A Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate in Kentucky is criticizing Republican Mitch McConnell for allegedly trying to defund a federal program that detects and curbs the spread of infectious diseases.

Amy McGrath is one of 10 Democrats seeking her party’s nomination for the Senate seat held by McConnell.

The New Yorker recently reported that in 2017, McConnell pushed an amendment that would have ended funding for the Prevention and Public Health Fund.

McGrath also blames McConnell for decreased funding for important public health organizations like the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Rhonda J Miller

Kentucky State Representative Charles Booker is one of 10 Democratic candidates competing to be the party nominee for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by Republican Mitch McConnell, who has seven challengers. 

The state primary originally scheduled for May 19 has been rescheduled for June 23 due to the outbreak of the coronavirus. The general election is Nov. 3.

Booker has represented Kentucky's 43rd State House District, which covers part of Jefferson County, since January 2019.

During a campaign visit to Bowling Green, Booker stopped by the WKU Public Radio studio to talk with reporter Rhonda Miller. That conversation took place before the coronavirus required "social distancing" and drew much of the focus away from the state's primary election. This is one of a series of WKU Public Radio interviews with candidates in the Democratic primary.

Rhonda J. Miller

A state legislator who says he will work to eliminate poverty is running to win the state’s Democratic U.S. Senate primary.

Representative Charles Booker brought his campaign to Bowling Green on Monday with stops at the Warren County Democratic Woman’s Club and other events.

Charles Booker said when he was growing up in the west end of Louisville, he remembers his mother going without food so he could eat. 

Booker said, in his opinion, big corporations get too many tax breaks while many working people struggle to make ends meet.


Rhonda J. Miller

The retired Marine fighter pilot running to win Kentucky’s Democratic U.S. Senate primary brought her campaign to Bowling Green on Monday.

Amy McGrath is hoping to be the Democrat who takes on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in November. McGrath spoke at the Warren County Democratic Woman’s Club. 

McGrath was raised in northern Kentucky and had a 20-year career in the military.  She and her husband, a retired Navy pilot, moved back to Kentucky where they’re raising their three children.

McGrath said her campaign is focusing on the daily concerns of Kentuckians. 


Booker and McGrath campaigns

The tensions between the more center-left wing of the Democratic Party (think Joe Biden and Nancy Pelosi) and the party’s left-wing (Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Bernie Sanders) are fairly high right now, with the Democratic primary in full swing. And this fight will play out in Kentucky over the next month — and perhaps through May.

State Representative Charles Booker, who recently set up an exploratory committee for a possible 2020 Senate run, is spending this month traveling across the state, trying to decide if he should formally enter the race. The Sunrise Movement, a national group pushing for a climate change plan called the Green New Deal, announced its support of Booker last week and more liberal lawmakers in the statehouse like Nima Kulkarni are also encouraging his run. If he runs, Booker in particular would set up a clear contrast with Amy McGrath, a more center-left Democratic candidate for the seat currently held by Republican Sen. Mitch McConnell.

Lisa Autry

A Democratic state lawmaker exploring a run against U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell says he would be committed to the Green New Deal if elected to Congress. 

State Representative Charles Booker from Jefferson County was in Bowling Green on Friday where he picked up an endorsement from the Sunrise Movement, a youth-led climate activism group. 

Booker grew up in Louisville’s West End, the poorest zip code in the state. Booker said neighborhoods like his are disproportionately affected by environmental hazards.

screenshot from Amy McGrath for Senate YouTube

Two retired coal miners have sent a cease and desist letter to the U.S. Senate campaign of Amy McGrath. The retirees were shown in a campaign ad for the candidate.

Randy Robbins and Albrow Hall say they didn’t know a video of them would be used for a political attack advertisement until after it was already being broadcast.

The ad featured a reenactment of a 10-hour bus ride to Washington D.C. by coal miners advocating for black lung benefits.


Broadcaster Matt Jones Takes Step Toward Senate Run

Aug 29, 2019
J. Tyler Franklin

The host of a popular Kentucky sports talk show announced Thursday that he’s taking a step toward running as a Democrat for the seat of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell by forming an exploratory committee.

Matt Jones said on his radio show that his decision on whether to enter the 2020 campaign will come after this year’s statewide election in November.

If he gets in, he would face a tough primary next spring that includes ex-Marine combat aviator Amy McGrath — who narrowly lost a high-profile race for the U.S. House in 2018 and is already running TV ads promoting her Senate campaign. Whoever wins the Democratic nomination will face a daunting race against McConnell, the most powerful congressional Republican and the kingpin of Kentucky politics.

Becca Schimmel | WKU Public Radio

A Kentucky Democrat hoping to take Republican Mitch McConnell's U.S. Senate seat says the country needs stricter background checks for gun owners.

But Amy McGrath isn’t in favor of an assault weapons ban.

In comments made during an interview with WKU Public Radio, McGrath said if elected to the U.S. Senate, she’d push the chamber to take up measures she says are backed by both gunowners and those who don’t own firearms.


J. Tyler Franklin

Kentuckians dislike their governor and one of their senators more than the residents of any of the other 49 states. Yet, Kentuckians could re-elect Matt Bevin as governor this November.

The non-partisan D.C.-based Cook Political Report ranks Bevin’s race against Democrat Andy Behear as a toss-up right now. The state is, according to Cook, also “likely” to send Mitch McConnell back to the Senate for a seventh term next fall, even though Democrat and former Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath raised more than $2.5 million last month in her first day as candidate.

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