aerospace industry

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Elizabethtown and Somerset Community Colleges are holding recruiting events Thursday and Friday for Boeing manufacturing positions in Washington state. The company is offering up to $20,000 for relocating.  

Boeing is looking for people with skills in electrical technology, engineering and electronics technology and industrial maintenance technology. Butch Tincher is an instructor at Somerset Community College. He said Boeing’s hiring exam mirrors the school’s exit exam.

Bruce Parsons, KVEC

Student teams from across the coalfields of eastern Kentucky came together at the Knott County Sportsplex, bringing with them drones that they themselves had built. It was time for the climax of this year-long project. A basketball court had been separated with nets, and padded gates marked a circuit course for the little flying machines.

Seth Hatfield was one of dozens thumbing the joysticks on a remote control, and making last minute adjustments to four colorful propellers on top of a machine that had taken a full school year of teamwork to build. It was time for the drone race.


Becca Schimmel

The Ohio Valley was once synonymous with steel. Even after the industry’s sharp decline the region is still home to many industries that produce or use steel and aluminum. Those industries are closely watching what the Trump administration will do on steel and aluminum imports.

The Department of Commerce has suggested a massive 24 percent global tariff on those imports. As a candidate, Donald Trump promised to apply tariffs. Now, it’s unclear if President Trump will follow through.

Kentucky Aerospace Advocates Push For Industry Study

Jun 24, 2014

Aerospace advocates have briefed state lawmakers on how investment in aviation and space technology could spur job creation and improve the STEM scores of public school students.

In the mid-1990s, Kentucky was one of the nation’s leaders in aerospace engineering and manufacturing. 

To hone that edge, the Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education has partnered with over 30 schools in Kentucky and Tennessee to shore up math and science scores and “pipeline” students into aerospace fields.

Dr. Tim Smith is the CEO of the institute. He says that increased coordination among state cabinets in focusing on aerospace could accelerate the impact of the student pipeline.

“Over the past three years, we’ve noticed we’ve had 100 percent graduation rate," said Smith.  "Not one student has dropped out of school. We’re 17 percent higher on the state average on the ACT, and we meet the benchmarks for college readiness in math and science. We exceed them quite heavily.” 

Experts estimate that as of last year, aerospace manufacturing had a $5.5 billion dollar impact on Kentucky’s economy.