2019 election

facebook.com/andybeshear

Voter turnout in the Nov. 5 general election in Kentucky surged past the prediction by the secretary of state. Alison Lundergan Grimes predicted a 31 percent voter turnout for the election for governor and other statewide offices, but voters easily beat that prediction, with 42 percent casting ballots.

Warren County Clerk Lynnette Yates said both political parties had so much at stake in the governor’s race that it ignited an unusual amount of voter interest. 

"Everyone was very passionate about it, I think," said Yates. "So, I think that instilled in everyone that they needed to get out and vote. Typically, the governor’s race is not one we have great voter turnout for. Our last governor’s race I think we were right at 28, or 29 percent.”


Matt Bevin campaign

Kentucky’s chief election officer says she doesn’t think Governor Matt Bevin will be able to successfully challenge the results of Tuesday’s election. 

According to unofficial results, the Republican incumbent lost to Democrat Andy Beshear by 5,189 votes.

Bevin formally requested a recanvass on Wednesday, which will be conducted Thursday, November 14.  The process requires county clerks to make sure the vote totals from each machine were recorded accurately.

Ryland Barton

Attorney General Andy Beshear is turning his attention towards setting up a new administration after vote totals showed him winning yesterday’s race for governor by more than 5,000 votes.

Incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin still hasn’t conceded the race. Last night he claimed, without evidence, that there were “irregularities” in the election that needed to be looked into.

Beshear has claimed victory and on Wednesday said that he is moving forward with the process of hiring officials for his administration and writing a budget proposal.

 


Updated at 2:45 a.m. ET Wednesday

Democrats had a strong election night on Tuesday, leading the race for governor in Kentucky and taking back full control of the Virginia legislature for the first time in nearly a quarter century.

Tuesday's statewide elections in Kentucky and Virginia were a big night for Democrats. And the results tell us a few things about national politics, consequential issues and President Trump.

In Kentucky, Democrat Andy Beshear, the son of former Gov. Steve Beshear, claimed victory Tuesday night and narrowly leads incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin by about 5,000 votes. Bevin has not yet conceded the race.

J. Tyler Franklin

Democrat Andy Beshear got about 4,500 more votes on Election Day than incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin. Several media outlets called the race for Beshear, but the Associated Press deemed it too close to call late Tuesday as Republicans swept all other statewide races.

Bevin called the race “a squeaker” when he spoke first Tuesday evening — but he promised not to concede.

“This is a close, close race,” Bevin said at the Republican gathering at the Galt House Hotel in Louisville. “We are not conceding this race by any stretch. Not a chance.”

thinkstock

Democrat Andy Beshear Garners Most Votes As Republicans Sweep Down Ballot Races

Democrat Andy Beshear got about 4,500 more votes on Election Day than incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin. Several media outlets called the race for Beshear, but the Associated Press deemed it too close to call late Tuesday as Republicans swept all other statewide races.

Bevin called the race “a squeaker” when he spoke first Tuesday evening — but he promised not to concede.

“This is a close, close race,” Bevin said at the Republican gathering at the Galt House Hotel in Louisville. “We are not conceding this race by any stretch. Not a chance.”

Daniel Cameron

Daniel Cameron, a 33-year-old corporate attorney and former counselor for Mitch McConnell has won the election to become Kentucky’s Attorney General.

At less than half the age of his Democratic opponent, Daniel Cameron will become the state’s first African-American to win state office at the top of the ticket.

Cameron defeated Former Attorney General and House Speaker Greg Stumbo.

Michael Adams

Kentucky’s next Secretary of State is Republican Michael Adams. Adams, an election lawyer with ties to prominent conservative politicians, defeated Democrat Heather French Henry, a former state government official and Miss America.

The Secretary of State is Kentucky’s top election official, and also oversees administrative functions such as maintaining business filings.

Adams is an election lawyer in Louisville and serves as counsel for the Great America Committee, a political action committee created by Vice President Mike Pence.

Mike Harmon

Former legislator and Republican incumbent Mike Harmon has won reelection as Kentucky’s Auditor of Public Accounts.

Voters elected Harmon over Democrat Sheri Donahue and Libertarian Kyle Hugenberg to serve another four years as the state’s chief auditor. With 78 percent of precincts reporting, Harmon received 55 percent of the vote. In the role, Harmon will continue to serve as an independent office tasked with reviewing accounts, financial transactions and the performance of all state government.

Harmon said he plans to use his second term to build on his accomplishments.

Commonwealth of Kentucky

Republican Allison Ball has won a second term as state treasurer against challenger Michael Bowman, according to the Associated Press.

In a previous interview, Ball pointed to her work launching projects like a state spending transparency website, and starting a savings and investment program for Kentuckians with disabilities. She said starting these accounts, which were enabled by a federal law, allow people with disabilities who are enrolled in programs like Social Security Income to save more money without losing that benefit.

Voters in four states head to the polls on Tuesday for general statewide elections of note. These off-year contests may not be as high profile as the 2020 presidential and congressional elections will be a year from now, but they could offer some important hints on how voters are feeling about President Trump, impeachment, guns and more.

thinkstock

Polls open on Tuesday, November 5 at 6 a.m. and close at 6 p.m local time. If you’re in line at 6 p.m., you will be allowed to vote. You can view your sample ballot by going to the Kentucky Secretary of State's website.

If you’re wondering if you’re registered to vote in Kentucky (and hopefully you are, because the deadline to register and still vote in November was last month!) you can check on the Secretary of State’s website.

Acceptable forms of identification include a driver’s license, credit card, social security card, personal acquaintance of an Election Officer, any other identification with both your picture and signature, or any U.S. government-issued ID card.

Ryland Barton

President Donald Trump lent a hand to Gov. Matt Bevin’s reelection effort on Monday, headlining a rally in Lexington hours before Kentuckians head to the polls to weigh in on whether to keep Bevin for another four years.

At the rally, Trump teased Bevin, telling the audience that the Kentucky governor is a “pain” because he is frequently asking the federal government for aid.

“I say ‘Matt, do I have to do it? Please, please.’ But isn’t that what you want in a governor? That’s what you want,” Trump said.

 


Ryan Quarles' Facebook

Kentucky's Republican Commissioner of Agriculture has largely flown under the radar while addressing many pressing issues facing the state's farms. He's banking his track record will carry him to a second term in office following the Nov. 5 election

Recently, the ninth-generation Kentucky farmer has led effort to alleviate the effects of a trade war that has farmers caught in the middle, as well as the legalization of hemp.


Pages