Colin Jackson

Morning Edition Host/Reporter

Colin Jackson joined the WKU Public Radio news team in October 2018 as Morning Edition Host and Reporter. Jackson comes to Kentucky from Michigan where he worked in the newsroom of NPR member station WDET in Detroit. He also has experience as a host and producer with Townsquare Media in Lansing, Michigan and Impact 89FM in East Lansing.

Colin holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Relations & Policy and Spanish from Michigan State University. 

Rob Taber

Lost River Sessions Live returned to the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green for a special October show featuring Tennesee-based musicians Liz Brasher and Justin Kalk.


Ryan Quarles' Facebook

Kentucky's Republican Commissioner of Agriculture has largely flown under the radar while addressing many pressing issues facing the state's farms. He's banking his track record will carry him to a second term in office following the Nov. 5 election

Recently, the ninth-generation Kentucky farmer has led effort to alleviate the effects of a trade war that has farmers caught in the middle, as well as the legalization of hemp.


Courtesy of Robert Conway

On November 5, Kentuckians will head to the polls to elect constitutional positions like Governor, Attorney General and Secretary of State.

Eigth-generation Kentucky farmer Robert Conway is running for Agriculture Commissioner

Focal points for the Scott County Democrat include saving the state's family farms, and encouraging more young people to pick up the trade.


Bryan Lemon

Our first show of the season featured a performance from the North Carolina group, Mipso. The act headlined the September Lost River Sessions LIVE concert at the Capitol Arts Center in Bowling Green, KY.

Since coming together six years ago in Chapel Hill, the group and it's blend of acoustic, folk and indie music has gained worldwide recognition. They have toured internationally, played the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and have been the subject of a documentary. The band's latest project, Edges Run, was released last year.

Kentucky LRC

Overcrowding has become a major issue facing Kentucky's county jails.

The most recently available numbers from the Kentucky Department of Corrections show county detention centers collectively are nearly 5,000 inmates over capacity.

We spoke with Justice and Public Safety Cabinet John Tilley about the causes behind and ways to address this situation.


Darius Barati

Our latest concert in our Lost River Sessions LIVE series featured Kentucky's very own Ian Noe and Nathan Blake Lynn. They performed live at the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame and Museum in downtown Owensboro.

Noe is a talented singer-songwriter who has made a big footprint in a very short amount of time. Two years ago, he left Kentucky for the first time to go on tour. He has played for his hero, John Prine, since then and is currently in the United Kingdom getting ready to perform in London. Noe's LRS LIVE performance this summer came just two months after the release of his first full-length album, Between the Country.


Colin Jackson

Time spent incarcerated or in rehabilitation centers is common when someone makes a mistake or needs to address substance abuse issues.

"Step down" services, however, aren't as common.

Those efforts provide a place for growth and a sense of community that helps soften the transition toward independence from a rough spot in life.

The Owensboro-based non-profit, Fresh Start for Women, is among those working to accomplish that goal.


Courtesy of Casey Haynes

Around 40% of Kentucky state inmates released in 2016 went back to jail within a couple years of getting out.

Most of those individuals went back to jail for breaking their terms of release rather than through committing a new crime.

Bowling Green business owner Casey Haynes could have been in that number. Instead, he recieved a break from the court. Now, he's making the most of that chance.

Haynes comes from Mississippi and describes himself as always having a strong parental figure in his mother.

He said he got into trouble after originally going to trade school for business management.

"I didn't do too well as far as working in that field. I ended up drifting off and doing some other things I wasn't interested in, and that led to being around...the wrong crowd of people," Haynes said.


Sarah Perrine

Everyone experiences prison time differently. To Sarah Perrine, who received a ten year sentence for a host of drug-related charges, it ended up being a life changing event.

She has the words "forgive" and "forget" tattooed on her neck. The motto suits her.

She's reconnecting with her daughter. She has a job at a local fast food restaurant where she recently received a promotion. And she's no longer one of the nearly 2,300 women currently in Kentucky's state prison system.

Instead, she's now part of the Southern Kentucky Reentry Council to make coming home easier for others.

If you ask her, that's all because of one moment she had while she was in solitary confinement.

Perrine describes it as "13 cells on one walk and everybody was just yelling and screaming constantly."


Kevin Willis

When someone goes to jail, it's often difficult for them to move on from the criminal justice system.

At the Barren County Detention Center, a group is promising to help inmates break the cycle and succeed once they return to society.

In the second of our four-part series on reentry in our region, we meet four individuals in that jail who are preparing to move on.


Owensboro Christian Church

World Refugee Day is being celebrated Saturday in Owensboro.

The International Center of Kentucky is hosting the event ahead of the United Nations-celebrated holiday on June 20.

Susann Bartlett, an employment specialist in the center’s Owensboro office, says the goal of the event is to connect refugees with various resources, while honoring their contributions to the area.

“It’s a chance for the public, our general public here in the community, to interact with our international community, and just get a little taste of culture and tradition and see what they can bring to our community.”

Prison overcrowding has increasingly become part of the national conversation. Meanwhile, states are trying to do more to keep ex-offenders from going back to jail after completing their sentences.

Recidivism has several negative consequences, including state spending on housing inmates and the fact that potential members of the workforce are unavailable.

This is the first story in a four-part series of reports about efforts to combat the trend in our region.


Colin Jackson

The final reading of an LGBTQ protection measure known as a Fairness Ordinance at Tuesday's Bowling Green City Commission meeting failed on a 3-2 vote.

It marked the latest rejection in a statewide effort to have local governments ban discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations based on gender identity or sexual orientation. The Bowling Green City Commission also rejected the Fairness Ordinance during its first reading at a meeting in April. 

Commissioner Brian "Slim" Nash played a nasty voicemail he received for supporting the measure prior to opening the floor for open comment.

Colin Jackson

The first reading of an ordinance that would provide greater protections for LGBTQ individuals failed to pass the Bowling Green City Commission at its meeting Tuesday night.  

The commission heard 24 public comments in favor of what's known as a "Fairness Ordinance", and nine comments against the proposal. 

The ordinance failed to pass on a vote of 3-2, with Mayor Bruce Wilkerson and Commissioners Joe Denning and Sue Parrigin voting against the proposal. Commissioners Slim Nash and Dana Beasley-Brown voted in favor of the proposal.


Lisa Autry

The Bowling Green City Commission is set to hear the first reading of a set of civil rights measures known as a "fairness ordinance" at its meeting Tuesday.

The proposal would prohibit discrimination in housing, employment and public accomodations on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity.

Commissioner Brian "Slim" Nash previously introduced the protections, but did not receive the second needed to bring them to a vote. He says that's when he decided not to reintroduce the ordinance until there was a shift in the makeup of the board.

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