Warren County Public Schools

Warren County Public Schools

Warren County's newest elementary school that opens Aug. 8 is on the leading edge in both sustainability and tech curriculum. 

Jennings Creek Elementary will have ‘coding’ as part of the curriculum from kindergarten through sixth grade. Coding, which is writing the language for computer programs, will be taught on an age appropriate level, so students naturally expand this essential 21st Century skill.

Morgan Watson is a spokeswoman for Warren County Public Schools. She said there’s another advantage of having coding embedded in the elementary curriculum.

Warren County Sheriff's Office

The Warren County Sheriff’s Office held a memorial ceremony on July 12 to honor a member of its team that died under suspicious circumstances. The law enforcement agency is continuing the investigation into the death of K-9 Kane.

The only K-9 with the sheriff’s office was found unresponsive in his outdoor kennel at the home of his handler, Deputy Aaron Poynter, in late April. Kane was rushed to the vet, but couldn’t be saved.

"A necropsy was done immediately and evidence was sent to numerous labs for testing," said Sgt. Curtis Hargett, a spokesman for the sheriff’s office. "As time went on, we have determined now that the cause of death was foul play.”

School systems across Kentucky are making plans ahead of a national school walkout on Wednesday to protest gun violence. 

Organizers of the Women’s March have called for a 17-minute walkout at 10:00 a.m., one minute for each of the 17 victims killed in the Parkland, Florida school shooting on February 14.

Warren County Schools Superintendent Rob Clayton says he supports students and their right to march in support of tighter gun laws.  He told WKU Public Radio that students won’t be punished as long as their activism is approved by their school principal.

Rhonda J Miller

A new elementary school under construction in Warren County is the latest building in the school district designed to reduce, or eliminate, the cost of energy.  The energy program is even earning money for the district.

Construction equipment and work crews crisscross the site of the new Jennings Creek Elementary on Russellville Road in Warren County. The walls going up are made of material that’s dramatically cutting the cost of energy for Warren County Public Schools.

School District Energy Manager Jay Wilson says there’s no secret to reducing energy costs. It begins with the design of the building.

"It’s a combination of having energy efficiencies built into the building envelope, such as insulated concrete forms..."


Becca Schimmel

Tuesday marked the end of the first year at Kentucky’s first stand-alone international high school, located in Bowling Green, a refugee resettlement area.

Shoes squeaked and laughter filled the small international high school, where the student body speaks about 30 different languages.

 

What used to be the annex of Warren Central High School is now home to Gateway to Educational Opportunities, or Geo International. The school serves 180 Warren County high school students from 24 different countries.

 


For the third time, a ruling has come down from the state supporting the Bowling Green city school district in their ongoing fight with the Warren County school district over the number of county students allowed to attend city schools with state funding. The Kentucky Board of Education voted Tuesday to uphold Education Commissioner Terry Holliday's previous ruling.

But, in making their ruling, the Board ordered both districts to do more negotiating over the number of students that would be acceptable to both districts with a report on their progress due back to the Board in December.

Holliday's decision that the Board upheld ruled that Bowling Green could enroll 750 Warren County students this school year.

A ruling from the Kentucky Education Commission is expected in two weeks regarding how many students the Warren County school system will allow to attend Bowling Green city schools this school year.

A 2001 agreement between the districts set a cap on the number of transferring students. But last April, the county lowered that number by about 90 students. The state would not reimburse the Bowling Green district for students over that number, but they could still attend city schools at a cost of a little over $4,000 a year.

After a three day hearing on the matter wrapped up Saturday morning, Bowling Green school superintendent Joe Tinius told WKU Public Radio there is a slight financial aspect to the controversy but he sees it as a bigger issue, saying neither side would see a net profit from the final decision.

"That's not what education is all about," said Tinius. "This is more about an opportunity for parents to have a choice on where to send their children to school."

The last-minute nature of the county's decision is also causing city schools planning problems for hiring the right amount of staff for the coming school year. "We were already well into planning for the school year and had to back up and start all over again," Tinius said. "And now with a decision expected just a week before school starts, we have to be prepared for either scenario."