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Tennessee’s Democratic U.S. Senate nominee said Friday he supports Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Former Governor Phil Bredesen had previously avoided a public commitment on the issue.

Bredesen released a statement this morning just as the U.S. Senate was finalizing a cloture vote that allows a final confirmation vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination.

Updated at 8:41 p.m. ET

Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court cleared a key procedural hurdle in the Senate on Friday, and his confirmation now seems all but certain, after a key swing vote, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, declared her support in a speech on the Senate floor.

Moments after Collins completed her remarks, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., announced in a statement that he too will support the nomination when it comes up for a final vote.

That final vote is expected as soon as Saturday.

Claims Fly in Ads in Competitive Tennessee Senate Race

Oct 4, 2018
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As more attention is focused on Tennessee's increasingly competitive Senate race, a flood of attack ads continues to hit people's screens.

Influential political groups bought a handful of ads this week that cover a wide range of issues circling the race.

One ad, paid for by the Republican National Committee, claims sexual misconduct cases "skyrocketed" when Democratic candidate Phil Bredesen was governor.

Thinkstock

The nation’s largest professional sports organizations are registering in Kentucky for the first time following a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision. 

The high court in May ruled that a federal gambling statute violated the U.S. Constitution and cleared the way for individual states to decide on sports betting. 

The National Football League, Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, and the PGA Tour have all registered to lobby during the 2019 General Assembly.

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The American Bar Association said the Senate should not hold a confirmation vote on Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court until the FBI investigated sexual assault allegations against him that were made by Christine Blasey Ford and other women.

Updated at 7:50 a.m. ET

Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, along with the American public, are hearing, for the first time, on Thursday directly from Christine Blasey Ford, the university professor who has accused Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault when they were both teenagers in high school.

Abbey Oldham

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul says the White House needs to use a lie detector test to find out who wrote an anonymous op-ed published in the New York Times this week.

The op-ed is purportedly written by a senior official in President Trump’s administration who claims to be a part of an internal resistance effort actively working to block the president’s most extreme policies and instincts.

Kentucky GOP Files Ethics Complaint Against Grimes

Sep 4, 2018
Alix Mattingly

The Republican Party of Kentucky has filed an ethics complaint against Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

The complaint says Grimes is not complying with a previous ruling from the Executive Branch Ethics Commission. RPK Executive Director Sarah Van Wallaghen wrote in a complaint filed Friday that a commission opinion from 2010 stated the Secretary of State does not have access to the statewide voter registration database.

The confirmation of a Supreme Court justice is often a major event that ripples through American law for decades. But Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation hearing, which opens Tuesday, is especially historic because, if confirmed, Kavanaugh is expected to solidify a hard-right majority on the nation's highest court, a majority the likes of which has not been seen since the early 1930s, and which is likely to dominate for a generation or more.

As both parties begin their final post-Labor Day sprint to Election Day, there are concrete signs that Democratic voters are fired up heading into the midterm elections.

Nowhere is that more evident than in the majority of states that have already held primaries. There's been massive increases in Democratic turnout while often a minimal uptick — or even noticeable dip — in turnout among Republican voters.

Alix Mattingly

The executive director of the Kentucky State Board of Elections is accusing Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes of improperly accessing the state’s voter registration system, creating a hostile work environment and using her position to politicize the election system.

This is the second time in a year that Grimes has been accused of ethical mishaps by a staff member of the state’s elections agency.

Bevin Says He's Running for Second Term as Governor in 2019

Aug 27, 2018
J. Tyler Franklin

Kentucky Republican Gov. Matt Bevin says he will run for re-election in 2019, ending months of speculation as he has faced growing protests from public workers and teachers about his rhetoric and policies.

Bevin announced his campaign Saturday in a speech to the Republican Party of Kentucky's annual Lincoln Day Dinner in Lexington with characteristic bravado, saying simply: "You bet I'm running again."

"The reality is there is a lot of work yet to do. And to not continue keeping the foot on the gas would be, frankly, the wrong thing for the state, it would be the wrong thing for all those who had worked so hard, the wrong thing for our existing legislature," Bevin told reporters after his speech.

Bevin Criticized for Comparing Critics to Drowning Victims

Aug 15, 2018
J. Tyler Frankin

Facing a groundswell of opposition from public workers for his proposed pension changes, Kentucky Republican Gov. Matt Bevin compared them to drowning victims on Tuesday in that "you just need to knock them out and drag them to shore."

Bevin's comments came during a live interview with Brian Thomas on WKRC in Cincinnati. He said the state must make changes to the pension system or it will collapse, risking the retirements of hundreds of thousands of people and their loved ones.

Ryland Barton

Teachers got a lot of love from speakers during the Fancy Farm political speaking event.

U.S. Congressman James Comer made a point to thank teachers who showed up to Fancy Farm, saying that they “deserve the respect of our highest elected officials.”

The comment is a dig at Gov. Bevin, who has made several inflammatory statements about teachers, including a claim that teachers left their students vulnerable to sexual assault and drug abuse by protesting in Frankfort earlier this year.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

Williamson County businessman Bill Lee was the surprise winner of the Republican primary for governor Thursday night.

The Christian conservative and owner of the Lee Co. beat out former Economic Development Commissioner Randy Boyd, Congressman Diane Black and House Speaker Beth Harwell.

According to the uncertified election results at the end of the night, Lee won with 36.8 percent of the vote. Boyd took second with 24.3 percent — nearly 100,000 votes behind him. Black came in right behind him at 23 percent. And Harwell took a distant fourth at 15.3 percent.

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