income inequality

Alexandra Kanik

Jim Thacker is frustrated.

The spokesperson for the Madison County, Kentucky, Health Department said there is a real threat of a Hepatitis A outbreak at the detention center right down the road in Richmond.

Built to house about 240 inmates, it holds more than 400. 

“It’s like a petri dish, they are packed so close together,” he said.

The majority of the Madison County inmates are in jail on drug charges, and health officials say the homeless and people with substance abuse disorders are most vulnerable to Hep A infection in this outbreak.


Tableau

A new report shows the average income of the top one percent of Kentuckians is more than 18.4 times greater than the average income of state residents.

Income for the wealthiest one percent of earners in Kentucky was more than $719,012 in 2015, compared to an average income of almost $39,990 for all other Kentuckians. The report from the Economic Policy Institute shows from 2009 to 2015 the top one percent income grew 23.2 percent while everyone else’s income grew only 7.2 percent. Ashley Spalding is a senior policy analyst with the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy.  

Kentucky Poor People's Campaign

The Poor People’s Campaign is returning to Frankfort Monday for another rally. The group was denied access to the Kentucky state capitol building during the event last week. There will also be demonstrations at state capitol buildings in Tennessee and Indiana.

Monday’s rally will focus on living wages, housing and education. More than 30 states will be participating in the demonstration at 2 p.m. local time. Reverend Megan Huston, pastor of First Christian Church in Bowling Green was at last week’s rally when the group was denied access to the Kentucky State Capitol.

UN Jean-Marc Ferre

The United Nations has just published a report on poverty in the U.S. based on a fact-finding tour that included parts of the Ohio Valley.

The UN report says that of the 40 million poor Americans about 5.3 million live in “Third World conditions of absolute poverty.”

 

The study also suggests recent tax reforms will worsen the situation for U.S. citizens and ensure that the country remains the most unequal society in the developed world. UN Special Rapporteur for Human Rights Philip Alston was the report’s lead author. In an interview with the Ohio Valley ReSource, he said poverty has significant human rights implications.

“I think that if people are really living in very poor circumstances their ability to exercise a lot of their basic civil rights is greatly impaired,” he said.