Arts & Culture

Goodnight Memorial Library

The Goodnight Memorial Library in Franklin is beginning a $6 million renovation this month. The library in Simpson County was built in 1936 as a project of the Works Progress Administration and renovated in 1976. The current renovation will restore some of the original 1936 style of the library.

Library director Audrey Phillips says the move to temporary space is a major effort.

“We have over 40,000 items that are going to have to be moved. We have tried to weed some down, we’re only taking with us what we need, what we want on the shelf.”

Becca Schimmel

Bowling Green could be home to a new trolley service this spring. Nashville-based Gray Line Trolley is offering free rides through Saturday, in hopes of making the service permanent. Bowling Green hasn’t had a trolley in more than 100 years.

The first few days of trolley rides are a trial period to see whether residents are interested in the service. Gray Line is a private business and is sponsoring the free rides. If the service becomes permanent, those wanting rides would pay. That cost hasn’t been determined yet. Beth Noffsinger is the public relations manager with the Bowling Green Convention and Visitors Bureau. She said free rides are available from 2 to 8 p.m. Friday, and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.

Kevin Willis

The Western Kentucky University School of Journalism and Broadcasting is commemorating the 50th anniversary of one of the most tumultuous years in recent U.S. history—1968.

That year, the Vietnam War was raging, the Civil Rights struggle was in full-swing, and Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy were assassinated. An exhibition of images is being displayed through the end of November that depict life as it was that year on the WKU campus.


Nancy Dawson/facebook

The ‘8th of August’ is a day that holds special meaning for some Kentucky communities. It’s a time to remember emancipation and celebrate freedom.

It’s considered the day African-Americans in western Kentucky heard about the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 as a presidential order, but it wasn't until December 1865 that Congress ratified the 13th Amendment that permanently abolished slavery in the United States. 

Nancy Dawson, who lives in Russellville and is a former professor and director of African-American studies at Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tenn., said emancipation is a part of history that everyone in the United States should remember. 


21c Museum

The owners of 21c Museum Hotels are selling a majority interest in their company to the multinational AccorHotels group.

AccorHotels announced Tuesday that it’s acquiring 85 percent of 21c from founders Laura Lee Brown and Steve Wilson. The purchase price is $51 million.

Brown and Wilson established the flagship 21c Museum Hotel in Louisville in 2006. The company now operates eight properties in seven states, with three more in development.  The properties combine a boutique hotel, contemporary art gallery and chef-driven restaurant and bar.

Ron Baker via Creative Commons

A two-day outdoor music festival in Somerset is celebrating its 25th year with an American musical legend.

Singer-songwriter John Prine is the headlining act Saturday night at the Master Musicians Festival, which gets underway Friday afternoon at Festival Field on the campus of Somerset Community College.

Prine is known for his 1971 song “Paradise”, about the environmental impacts of coal mining on Muhlenberg County.

Emil Moffatt

Americana group The Carmonas joined organist Ken Stein on June 19, 2018 at St. Joseph's Catholic Church in Bowling Green for the latest installment of The Stained Glass Music Series. This concert was titled "No Boundaries" and joined Americana music with organ pieces written by American composers like Leo Sowerby, Robert Hebble, Calvin Hampton and Myron Roberts. 

The Stained Glass Music Series is made possible thanks to the generosity of Lynn and Dennis O'Keefe and the parishoners and staff at St. Joseph's Catholic Church. 

Lost River Sessions

Before he wowed the audience at Lost River Sessions LIVE in October 2017, Devon Gilfillian performed a solo set for the LRS cameras at the Artist Pad in Glasgow, Kentucky. Since then Gilfillian has signed a contract with Capitol Records and has been touring the country with his band. 

In the second half of the show, The Local Honeys, a Morehead, Kentucky-based group featuring Montana Hobbs on banjo and Linda Jean Stokely on fiddle. Their Lost River Session was recorded at Riverview at Hobson Grove in Bowling Green in February, 2018. 

Emil Moffatt

The International Bluegrass Music Museum's 2018 ROMP festival held during the last four days in June was so successful that organizers had to stop selling tickets at the gate. 

This year was the first time in the 15-year history of ROMP that one-day ticket sales for Saturday had to be stopped about 3 p.m. That final day of the festival on June 30, featuring headliners Alison Krauss and Sam Bush, maxed out the site at Yellow Creek Park in Daviess County, mainly for parking.

Rhonda J. Miller

America’s shameful history of lynching blazed into the spotlight with the recent  opening of The National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama.  Some call it the “lynching museum.”

Russellville, Kentucky opened its own small lynching museum 10 years ago, the vision of one man who made a promise to tell the truth.

Billie Holiday’s haunting song Strange Fruit about “black bodies swinging in the southern breeze” plays quietly in a one-room lynching-museum in Russellville, Kentucky. The room is nearly filled by a tree with four rope nooses hanging from it.


Ryland Barton

A Kentucky college student has produced a documentary about the saga surrounding the recent passage of a new public pension law, and the loud protests of public school teachers who opposed the measure.

The 25 minute documentary is called 151, a reference to the bill number of the controversial pension law.

The Herald-Leader reports it was produced by Asbury sophomore John Bowling, and recent University of Kentucky graduate Sawyer Holcomb.

Rob Taber

It was a hot afternoon May 12 at the first Lost River Sessions Arts & Music Festival. But that didn't stop hundreds from attending the outdoor festival at Fountain Square Park. Later that evening, Willie Watson, Joan Shelley and the Dead Broke Barons put on a fabulous show inside the Capitol Arts Center. 

Updated at 3:27 p.m. ET

Kate Spade, the designer who built a billion-dollar brand of luxury handbags and accessories, was found dead in her Park Avenue apartment in Manhattan on Tuesday. She was 55.

New York Police Department officials said that police received a call around 10:30 a.m. and that officers found Spade unconscious and unresponsive in the bedroom of her Park Avenue apartment. She was pronounced dead at the scene.

"It was a suicide," NYPD spokeswoman Arlene Muniz told NPR, without providing further details.

Scott Hamilton, LLC

In a society obsessed with winning, we sometimes hand out trophies simply for participating.  Olympic Figure Skater Scott Hamilton says participation trophies set a bad precedent and lead to mediocrity. 

In his third book Finish First: Winning Changes Everything, the 1984 Olympic gold medalist talks about identifying, pursuing, and achieving your finish first moment. 

In this interview, he talks about why he kept his gold medal in a brown paper bag in his underwear drawer for almost a decade.  Hamilton recently spoke in Bowling Green as a guest of the Warren County Public Library’s Local Inspiration series.


In a career that spanned more than half a century, Tom Wolfe wrote fiction and nonfiction best-sellers including The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and The Bonfire of the Vanities. Along the way, he created a new type of journalism and coined phrases that became part of the American lexicon. Wolfe died Monday in Manhattan. He was 88.

Wolfe didn't start a novel with a character or a plot, but rather, with an idea. In 1987, wearing his signature white suit, Wolfe told me how he began his first novel, a panoramic story of New York Society:

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