2018 election

Kentucky GOP Files Ethics Complaint Against Grimes

Sep 4, 2018
Alix Mattingly

The Republican Party of Kentucky has filed an ethics complaint against Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

The complaint says Grimes is not complying with a previous ruling from the Executive Branch Ethics Commission. RPK Executive Director Sarah Van Wallaghen wrote in a complaint filed Friday that a commission opinion from 2010 stated the Secretary of State does not have access to the statewide voter registration database.

As both parties begin their final post-Labor Day sprint to Election Day, there are concrete signs that Democratic voters are fired up heading into the midterm elections.

Nowhere is that more evident than in the majority of states that have already held primaries. There's been massive increases in Democratic turnout while often a minimal uptick — or even noticeable dip — in turnout among Republican voters.

Ryland Barton

Teachers got a lot of love from speakers during the Fancy Farm political speaking event.

U.S. Congressman James Comer made a point to thank teachers who showed up to Fancy Farm, saying that they “deserve the respect of our highest elected officials.”

The comment is a dig at Gov. Bevin, who has made several inflammatory statements about teachers, including a claim that teachers left their students vulnerable to sexual assault and drug abuse by protesting in Frankfort earlier this year.

Meribah Knight / WPLN

Williamson County businessman Bill Lee was the surprise winner of the Republican primary for governor Thursday night.

The Christian conservative and owner of the Lee Co. beat out former Economic Development Commissioner Randy Boyd, Congressman Diane Black and House Speaker Beth Harwell.

According to the uncertified election results at the end of the night, Lee won with 36.8 percent of the vote. Boyd took second with 24.3 percent — nearly 100,000 votes behind him. Black came in right behind him at 23 percent. And Harwell took a distant fourth at 15.3 percent.

Rough Governor's Race Highlights Thursday's Tennessee Primary Election

Aug 2, 2018
Creative Commons

Four candidates who have spent tens of millions of dollars of their own wealth fighting over who is more devoted to President Donald Trump face off Thursday in the Republican primary for Tennessee governor.

Meanwhile, former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen and Republican U.S. Rep. Marsha Blackburn face only nominal primary opposition in their high-profile race to replace retiring Republican Sen. Bob Corker, one of several contests that could decide control of the Senate.

hank4ky.com

The Democratic nominee for Kentucky’s Second Congressional District thinks the U.S. needs to consider offering amnesty to certain people who are living in the country without documentation.  

Hank Linderman said U.S. policymakers have to consider a wide range of solutions in dealing with the country’s estimated 12 million unauthorized immigrants.

“President Reagan signed a bill in 1986 to allow undocumented people that were in the United States to become citizens, and it was called the ‘Reagan Amnesty of 1986.’ So one of things I’ll be proposing very soon is amnesty for folks who have been in the United States since July 4, 2018.”

In an election year shaping up to be a good one for Democratic women candidates, Republican women could see their numbers drop after November. But one state where GOP women might find success is in Tennessee.

Rep. Marsha Blackburn will go up against former Democratic Gov. Phil Bredesen in one of the year's most critical and competitive Senate races. Rep. Diane Black is running for governor, though she first has to win a very competitive primary next week.

WKU Public Radio

The number of Tennesseans casting ballots during the state’s early voting period continues to increase.

Secretary of State Tre Hargett told The Tennessean that early voting is up about 2 percent compared to the same time period during the 2014 election cycle.

The early voting period in the Volunteer State began July 13 and ends July 28. A little more than 273,000 ballots had been cast by July 20.

With less than four months to go, how much are this year's midterm elections at risk for the kind of interference sowed by Russia in 2016?

How the Trade War is Changing Minds In a Senate Battleground

Jul 11, 2018
Tosh Farms

Jimmy Tosh's sprawling hog farm in rural Tennessee is an unlikely battleground in the fight for control of the U.S. Senate.

Yet his 15,000 acres two hours west of Nashville showcase the practical risks of President Donald Trump's trade policies and the political threat to red-state Republican Senate candidates such as Tennessee's Marsha Blackburn.

Tosh, a third-generation farmer who almost always votes Republican, said he's voting this fall for Blackburn's Democratic opponent, former Gov. Phil Bredesen, in part because Trump's trade wars are hurting his family business — a sizable one with some 400 employees and 30,000 pigs.

Former President Barack Obama has kept a low profile since he left office. It was just a coincidence that the man who so inspires Democrats made one of his rare public appearances in Beverly Hills on Thursday night during what has been a mostly dispiriting week for members of his party.

J. Tyler Franklin

For the first time since the Civil War, a majority of Kentucky voters don’t identify as Democrats as Republicans continue to make gains in voter registrations in the state.

As of June 15, Democrats make up 49.9 percent of registered voters in Kentucky while Republicans make up 41 percent and the rest identify either with a third party or as independents.

It's the thick of primary season, and the looming question that hangs over the 2018 midterms is — will Democrats take control of Congress?

Mike Braun Campaign

An independently wealthy businessman who largely self-financed his own campaign has defeated two sitting congressmen to become Indiana’s Republican nominee for Senate.

Republican primary voters picked Mike Braun to challenge Joe Donnelly, who is considered one of the Senate’s most vulnerable Democrats.

Braun ran as an outsider, blasting Reps. Todd Rokita and Luke Messer as “career politicians” who failed to follow through on campaign promises.

Kentucky Election Officials Given Cybersecurity Training

Apr 19, 2018

Kentucky's secretary of state says county officials are receiving cybersecurity training as the state bolsters efforts to protect its elections from the ongoing threat of hacking.

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes says county clerks statewide received the training Thursday from the Department of Homeland Security. She says the training is a crucial step to protect elections and to increase public confidence in the election process.

The training comes ahead of next month's primary election in Kentucky.

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