Asma Khalid

Asma Khalid is a political reporter. She travels the country focusing on voters through the lens of demographics and economics.

Before joining NPR's political team, Asma helped launch a new team for Boston's NPR station WBUR where she reported on biz/tech and the Future of Work.

She's reported on a range of stories over the years — including the 2016 presidential campaign, the Boston Marathon bombings and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Asma got her start in journalism in her home state of Indiana, but was introduced to radio through an internship at BBC Newshour in London during grad school.

Muslims are a tiny fraction of the U.S. population, making up somewhere around one percent, according to the Pew Research Center.

But a lot of Muslims live in key battleground states like Florida, Virginia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, which makes them a small but important group.

That's why Hillary Clinton's campaign is trying to make sure they show up in large numbers on Election Day.

Hillary Clinton's "basket of deplorables" remark has echoed through the political interwebs and produced many rounds of cable TV analysis.

Sure, conservatives pounced. And some liberals laughed in agreement. But does it matter in the real world?

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Hillary Clinton is starting to focus more on Hillary Clinton and less on Donald Trump. This comes in a week when Clinton released a policy book with her running mate. Much of her campaign has focused on white papers and policy proposals.

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North Carolina is the ultimate battleground turf this election season. Barack Obama narrowly won the state in 2008 by fewer than 15,000 votes, but he lost it in 2012.

Hillary Clinton would love to turn this Southern state blue again, and her success depends largely on black voters. In fact, she has no path to victory without African-Americans.

Millennials may be notorious for their low voter turnout, but they have growing political clout. This November, they'll rival baby boomers in terms of their sheer number of eligible voters. And that means they could be key deciders in battleground states. Theoretically, that ought to benefit a Democrat. But during the primaries, young voters were Hillary Clinton's Achilles' heel. Now Clinton is hoping they'll give her a second chance.

Hillary Clinton's recent surge in the polls is being fueled in part by a demographic that President Obama lost handily four years ago — white, college-educated voters.

"In over a half-century, no Democratic presidential candidate has carried white voters with a college degree," said Michelle Diggles, a senior political analyst with the center-left think tank Third Way, who described the split between the white working class and whites with a college degree as "the most underreported story of this year."

What would Ivanka Trump do if she were sexually harassed on the job?

GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump says she would quit.

"I would like to think she would find another career or find another company if that was the case," Donald Trump told Kirsten Powers in a USA Today column published Monday.

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Political spouses usually play a big role in party conventions, and this year, so do political daughters. Last week, Ivanka Trump introduced her dad. Tonight, Chelsea Clinton will introduce her mom. NPR's Asma Khalid reports.

This post was updated on July 22 at 12:30 a.m. ET

Donald Trump has not had a good record with women this campaign, but on Thursday night his eldest daughter, Ivanka, described her father as a champion of working women and mothers.

Asma Khalid/NPR

It's no secret Donald Trump is struggling to woo Hispanics voters. He's currently polling worse with Latinos than Mitt Romney in 2012 (In that election, Romney captured just 27 percent of the Hispanic vote).

But on Wednesday night, the Trump campaign might have a chance to shift its messaging ever-so-slightly when three Hispanic Republicans take center stage during primetime. Two of them are familiar faces from the primary season; former GOP presidential candidates - Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Florida Sen. Marco (who will deliver a video message.)

The other man, Ralph Alvarado, is a little known state-senator from Kentucky.

Alvarado, 46, is also a doctor and a delegate for his home state. And in 2014, he became the the first Hispanic elected to state office in Kentucky.

In an interview at the Quicken Loans Arena between floor speeches, Alvarado took some time to chat about Trump, Hispanics, and the Republican party.

It's no secret that Donald Trump is struggling to woo Hispanics voters. He's currently polling worse with Latinos than Mitt Romney in 2012 (In that election, Romney captured just 27 percent of the Hispanic vote.).

But on Wednesday night, the Trump campaign might have a chance to shift its messaging ever-so-slightly when three Hispanic Republicans take center stage during prime time. Two of them, former GOP presidential candidates, are familiar faces from the primary season: Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and Florida Sen. Marco (who will deliver a video message).

Donald Trump has staked his brand on winning. "We will have so much winning," he has said in this campaign, "if I get elected, that you may get bored with winning."

But can he win the presidential election? In a country that has changed rapidly demographically, Trump's best shot is to drive up turnout among white voters, especially white men. But how likely is that?

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This November's presidential election comes on the heels of a year of incomparable black activism.

Young activists are protesting in the streets, organizing on college campuses and disrupting campaign rallies to push for change in powerful ways.

You might expect this political energy to be reflected at the ballot box. But some activists, like Koya Graham, don't see much of a point in voting for president.

When Graham turned 18, the first thing she did was register to vote. And, year-after-year, she was a loyal voter — until this primary season.

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